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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a few ideas circulating about a high-capacity cargo trailer and was needing help configuring it to best meet a potential customer's needs.

I currently have two model ideas; a 110 gallon capacity that would weigh 38 lbs. and a 200 gallon capacity model weighing 60 lbs. These would be marketed to bike-based delivery folks, mainly.

About configuring; Do you like solid tires or pneumatic? Seatpost hitch or axle hitch? List any features or designs you like or wish you saw on trailers.

The operating idea is a cargo trailer with the capacity of a dedicated cargo trike. These will be big, often overloaded trailers. What do you think?
 

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While I can understand the principal benefit of solid tires, they aren't widely available commercially in reasonable sizes (although replacement should be infrequent), and they would ride like crap, reverbrating into the 'tractor' bike.

On the hitch front, I'd say neither. I'd prefer a rack mounted hitch, like Stu built up. Hella strong, and minimal effect on handling. I wouldn't want to hitch a huge load to the seatpost, and heavy loads + axle hitch = crappy handling.

Parking brake (reachable from seat) would also be nice (again, a la Stu). Light weight. Good clearance (at least 4" of free clearance at front and rear). Curb-hoppability would be nice, but not necessary (and might affect handling too significantly). Sturdy, sloped skids at front and rear to prevent hangups. Integrated reflectors and lighting options (preferably dynamo operated). Lots of good places to hook straps/ropes. Guides around wheels (to deflect posts, etc...again, preventing hangups.) Ability to mount fenders when required. Good protection to keep cargo away from moving wheels/tires. Theft prevention on connection to bike. Sensible locking options (make it easy to use a U-Lock, and perhaps include a built-in U Lock holder). Integrated little weatherproof toolbox for spares, tools, etc. Lightweight, but sturdy (aluminum? or steel for easy fixability?)
 

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CRXPilot said:
I currently have two model ideas; a 110 gallon capacity that would weigh 38 lbs. and a 200 gallon capacity model weighing 60 lbs. These would be marketed to bike-based delivery folks, mainly.
I know what a 60 lbs bike rides like (I owned a Batavus in the past and it was 65 lbs). I would not repeat the experience, even for a cargo bike.

CRXPilot said:
About configuring; Do you like solid tires or pneumatic? Seatpost hitch or axle hitch? List any features or designs you like or wish you saw on trailers.
Pneumatic tires. Easier to buy, replace, fix. Better ride.
Neither kind of hitch. I love the idea of a cargo bike, i.e. not a bike with a trailer. I own a Ute, and have used it when loaded with 50 lbs and plus of cargo. And the manoeuvrability is excellent. It is stable and steady. And because I ride in the city, where I share narrow bike paths with heavy traffic, the trailer is not a practical idea.

Just my two cents.
 

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ballbuster
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I would think...

CRXPilot said:
I have a few ideas circulating about a high-capacity cargo trailer and was needing help configuring it to best meet a potential customer's needs.

I currently have two model ideas; a 110 gallon capacity that would weigh 38 lbs. and a 200 gallon capacity model weighing 60 lbs. These would be marketed to bike-based delivery folks, mainly.

About configuring; Do you like solid tires or pneumatic? Seatpost hitch or axle hitch? List any features or designs you like or wish you saw on trailers.

The operating idea is a cargo trailer with the capacity of a dedicated cargo trike. These will be big, often overloaded trailers. What do you think?
... 60 pounds unloaded would be too heavy unless it had its own brakes, especially in the city when a car pulls in front of you. Around tight turns, it would want to push the rear axle to the outside, making it squirrely to ride.

Yeah, pneus all the way. Solid tires suck something awful, have crappy traction, ride like crap, and would pretty much mean that you would have to put suspension on the trailer.

On another point... sounds like you want to build a trailer, but put frankly, you don't really know what you want to build. Seems like you are asking tons of super basic questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
3eCheval said:
I know what a 60 lbs bike rides like (I owned a Batavus in the past and it was 65 lbs). I would not repeat the experience, even for a cargo bike.

Pneumatic tires. Easier to buy, replace, fix. Better ride.
Neither kind of hitch. I love the idea of a cargo bike, i.e. not a bike with a trailer. I own a Ute, and have used it when loaded with 50 lbs and plus of cargo. And the manoeuvrability is excellent. It is stable and steady. And because I ride in the city, where I share narrow bike paths with heavy traffic, the trailer is not a practical idea.

Just my two cents.
I like them too. I'm wanting to do home pickups and deliveries with this trailer though and a cargo bike may not meet my needs as well. Also, my city is pretty sparse by comparison. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
lawfarm said:
While I can understand the principal benefit of solid tires, they aren't widely available commercially in reasonable sizes (although replacement should be infrequent), and they would ride like crap, reverbrating into the 'tractor' bike.

On the hitch front, I'd say neither. I'd prefer a rack mounted hitch, like Stu built up. Hella strong, and minimal effect on handling. I wouldn't want to hitch a huge load to the seatpost, and heavy loads + axle hitch = crappy handling.

Parking brake (reachable from seat) would also be nice (again, a la Stu). Light weight. Good clearance (at least 4" of free clearance at front and rear). Curb-hoppability would be nice, but not necessary (and might affect handling too significantly). Sturdy, sloped skids at front and rear to prevent hangups. Integrated reflectors and lighting options (preferably dynamo operated). Lots of good places to hook straps/ropes. Guides around wheels (to deflect posts, etc...again, preventing hangups.) Ability to mount fenders when required. Good protection to keep cargo away from moving wheels/tires. Theft prevention on connection to bike. Sensible locking options (make it easy to use a U-Lock, and perhaps include a built-in U Lock holder). Integrated little weatherproof toolbox for spares, tools, etc. Lightweight, but sturdy (aluminum? or steel for easy fixability?)
I like all of this. To expand the discussion, this will be an enclosed trailer, hence the high unloaded weight. Lots of good ideas. Thanks!
 

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CRXPilot said:
https://www.cyclesmaximus.com/ChrisinLuton.jpg

Here's an image of the cargo capacity I'm shooting for.
In my city, I know such a contraption would cause me problems with the... cops. They wouldn't know where to allow me to ride : bikepath?- the rig would be too big - on the road with cars ? I would be too slow. It is a wonderful concept, and I wish we could use them. Lots of deliveries are done on distances allowing to do them by bike. That is why I am using a cargo bike for load of 50 to 100 lbs. Makes more sense to use pedal power then to use 2 tons of steel and petrole... Also, going without a car and petrole, means low overhead for a small business like mine. It only makes sense.
Good luck with your project.
 
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