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Discussion Starter #1
I've had my eye on this particular bike for a decade, viewing it from afar as they say, and it literally landed in my lap a couple of months ago. The owner wants to have it restored, and has enlisted my shop's services to do so. I finally took the time yesterday to dust it off and start taking an inventory of what I have here.

After a few conversations with people that know this bike, I am starting to realize this may not be the rider I had imagined it could be, and may be more appropriately purposed in a preserved state. At least one guy on this list is going to know exactly what it is, but for today I provide only a tease for the rest of you.

No spoilers please, but does anyone else know what it is?
 

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Certified Bike Junkie
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No clue what it is, but I'm pretty sure I'd want it. I also vote for leaving it as original as possible. Survivors are just cooler than full restorations.
 

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The cross over derailleur cable roller is unique. No clue but my guess would be a Cooks or Laguna MTB
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A little more

When I first heard about this bike, I knew it had been sitting for a long time, and was an early model from a builder whose work I greatly admire. I had imagined getting my hands on it at some point and making it into a rider for myself. Since it has arrived at my shop, I have found out it is far more unique that I could have imagined.

This particular bike was built as a trade show sample, one of two frames this brand displayed at the bike industry's annual event, and this was his first of these shows. It was an example of what this custom builder could potentially do for a customer, and was probably not really intended to be ridden. It has mounts for rim brakes, but also housing guides for hub brakes. The pulley derailer cable guides were yet another custom feature, that may not have shown up on his later frames.

After the show, it served as a display in a dealer's showroom, until it was eventually sold a year or two later.

I am familiar with how a restoration can turn an otherwise enjoyable bike into a shiny liability, but I do agree with the owner of this one that this bike is worthy of restoration and preservation. I will have to look elsewhere for my rider.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Landshark is a great guess

Although that is another favorite of mine. This bike has had a full life, and it was repainted a decade or so ago in this refrigerator white powder coat. Originally it was nickel plated, and painted brown over all but the fork crown, dropouts, and cable guides. So, no, not a Landshark.
 

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I have a 19814 Fat Chance Kicker with the same Cook Bros hubs, so I guess Fat.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Nope, not a Mountain Goat

Or a Fat Chance. The current shifters and handlebar are newer than the original parts, and make the bike look a few years newer than it really is. Below is a photo of the bike the day it was fully built, with its original parts, but keep in mind that picture was taken a year or so after the frame was welded and painted. I have also included a couple of pictures from a big ride Scottt took the bike on the following Fall.
 

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backpedal said:
Or a Fat Chance. The current shifters and handlebar are newer than the original parts, and make the bike look a few years newer than it really is. Below is a photo of the bike the day it was fully built, with its original parts, but keep in mind that picture was taken a year or so after the frame was welded and painted. I have also included a couple of pictures from a big ride Scottt took the bike on the following Fall.
Spec SJ...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I see the similarity...

but no, this one was built for the Long Beach Trade Show, in 1979. Still older.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I lied.

It wasn't 1979, it was Spring 1981. But it is a Ritchey.

Seekay has this up on his site:

Gary and I made our first presentation to the bicycle industry in the spring of 1981 at the Long Beach bicycle trade show. Gary had been to one or two trade shows in the course of his job with Bicycling, but I hadn't. It's overwhelming, the chaos and the intensity and the greed. It takes some getting used to, then you are addicted.

The house rules were that if your display took more than what you could walk in with, you had to pay for the union help. So Gary and I walked in with two bikes, a fat-tire Ritchey tandem and a fancy version of the regular bike, a card table and and two boxes of our cheaply printed literature. Meanwhile a few aisles away, Shimano had a booth the size of the Vatican, with sound and lights and a video of a wind tunnel test of the latest in bicycle technology, aerodynamic components, and a lot of guys wearing neckties ready to close the deals.
 

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backpedal said:
Meanwhile a few aisles away, Shimano had a booth the size of the Vatican, with sound and lights and a video of a wind tunnel test of the latest in bicycle technology, aerodynamic components, and a lot of guys wearing neckties ready to close the deals.
lmao:lol:
 
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