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Discussion Starter · #221 ·
So I've got two rides on mine. I'm coming from a Helm, but in the last 2 years I've also had a SR Suntour Auron PCS RC2, DVO Sapphire 34 D1, MRP Ribbon Air, Fox 34 FIT4, and Cane Creek Helm Air. I may or may not have a suspension ADD problem, although I find forks with a good balance of support, smoothness, and adjustment are hard to find. I also have ulnar neuropathy in my left hand, which means bike setup for me is a careful balance.

I've run it in three configurations as a 220lb rider, riding a lot of natural, steep-ish terrain:

1. Recommended: 73 main, 105 IRT, 3 rebound, full open LSC/HSC (~25% sag)
2. Adjustment A: 78 main, 115 IRT, 3 rebound, full open LSC/HSC (~20% sag)
3. Adjustment B: 78 main, 105 IRT, 3 rebound, full open LSC/HSC (Didn't check sag)

The recommended setting tracked well and was supple, but it tended to dive a little bit in corners and got a little squirrely at speed. I'm coming directly from my Helm, which is a super supportive fork, so part of that is probably just riding something less damped and getting used to it, but I think it was still too soft for my weight or the way I ride. I generally run it a bit on the firmer side, anyway.

I increased the main and IRT pressures and it felt good, but it felt like it was spiking a bit, which I attributed to the transition between the main compressing and the IRT starting to compress. I dropped 10psi out of the IRT and it seemed to smooth out a fair bit, although I think I'll add some LSC to help in corners and with braking, but that felt pretty close for now. I may also drop a few psi out of my main, maybe take it to 75 and closer to 22% sag.

Riding the recommended settings, I hit the HBO a bit and it is a very interesting feeling. I like it a lot, but it's kindof disorienting when you are used to your fork yanking you forward when it hits that end ramp up point. I think I hit it a few times on my first ride using the recommended settings and it was super nice.

Overall, the fork feels great. It tracks better than my Helm did, even when it was spiking a bit. It feels really smooth, the adjustments seem to have a pretty noticeable impact. The only thing I wish was different was the LSR adjuster, I'd prefer more granular adjustments, but that is kindof a nitpick and it feels really good for now. My rides have mostly been on the shorter side, too, so hopefully I'll get some others on bigger terrain. I may back it off slightly, because it does feel a bit on the firm side, but just barely. I may also try the recommended settings, but add 4-5 clicks of LSC.
One thing to remember with any recommended air pressures is that a shock pumps accuracy varies greatly. I have 3 analog and 2 digital pumps and between them, there is about a 15psi range in readings.the digital pumps are pretty similar with roughly a 3psi difference between them. The analog pumps are the ones that differ significantly.
 

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So I've got two rides on mine. I'm coming from a Helm, but in the last 2 years I've also had a SR Suntour Auron PCS RC2, DVO Sapphire 34 D1, MRP Ribbon Air, Fox 34 FIT4, and Cane Creek Helm Air. I may or may not have a suspension ADD problem, although I find forks with a good balance of support, smoothness, and adjustment are hard to find. I also have ulnar neuropathy in my left hand, which means bike setup for me is a careful balance.

I've run it in three configurations as a 220lb rider, riding a lot of natural, steep-ish terrain:

1. Recommended: 73 main, 105 IRT, 3 rebound, full open LSC/HSC (~25% sag)
2. Adjustment A: 78 main, 115 IRT, 3 rebound, full open LSC/HSC (~20% sag)
3. Adjustment B: 78 main, 105 IRT, 3 rebound, full open LSC/HSC (Didn't check sag)

The recommended setting tracked well and was supple, but it tended to dive a little bit in corners and got a little squirrely at speed. I'm coming directly from my Helm, which is a super supportive fork, so part of that is probably just riding something less damped and getting used to it, but I think it was still too soft for my weight or the way I ride. I generally run it a bit on the firmer side, anyway.

I increased the main and IRT pressures and it felt good, but it felt like it was spiking a bit, which I attributed to the transition between the main compressing and the IRT starting to compress. I dropped 10psi out of the IRT and it seemed to smooth out a fair bit, although I think I'll add some LSC to help in corners and with braking, but that felt pretty close for now. I may also drop a few psi out of my main, maybe take it to 75 and closer to 22% sag.

Riding the recommended settings, I hit the HBO a bit and it is a very interesting feeling. I like it a lot, but it's kindof disorienting when you are used to your fork yanking you forward when it hits that end ramp up point. I think I hit it a few times on my first ride using the recommended settings and it was super nice.

Overall, the fork feels great. It tracks better than my Helm did, even when it was spiking a bit. It feels really smooth, the adjustments seem to have a pretty noticeable impact. The only thing I wish was different was the LSR adjuster, I'd prefer more granular adjustments, but that is kindof a nitpick and it feels really good for now. My rides have mostly been on the shorter side, too, so hopefully I'll get some others on bigger terrain. I may back it off slightly, because it does feel a bit on the firm side, but just barely. I may also try the recommended settings, but add 4-5 clicks of LSC.


Thanks for the review.

If you are say this fork is feeling soft and "less damped", but you've got the LSC and HSC fully open... am I missing something?
 

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Discussion Starter · #224 ·
There is one somewhere but last I heard they are still a month or two out with no solid ETA.
The first (albeit very small) production batch just arrived a few days ago. Mostly for OEM I believe, but you might see them pop up for sale shortly. Not to far out even if these don't see aftermarket sales

There is a thread for it around here somewhere. Its an amazing shock
 

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One thing to remember with any recommended air pressures is that a shock pumps accuracy varies greatly. I have 3 analog and 2 digital pumps and between them, there is about a 15psi range in readings.the digital pumps are pretty similar with roughly a 3psi difference between them. The analog pumps are the ones that differ significantly.
For sure. I've been using a digital, but it appears with this fork even 3-5psi makes a difference, so a bit of variance on their end, a bit on mine, and it could have it settled in the travel more than it should be. They do recommend 20-25% on the tuning guide, the figure on the guide sat me right around 25%, as much as I can measure accurately and consistently, anyway.

Thanks for the review.

If you are say this fork is feeling soft and "less damped", but you've got the LSC and HSC fully open... am I missing something?
I meant in comparison to the Helm, which is fairly firm even with all of the adjusters opened up. I haven't really played with the adjusters that much, I've made some 2-3 click changes in the LSC adjuster, but I've been experimenting more with the IRT and main pressures for the time being, since that system is somewhat new to me and I want to keep the other variables the same. The adjusters seem to have good range and make fairly broad adjustments, from my brief push test.

I also wasn't saying it was 'too soft', rather that it can be set up more compliant than some of the forks I've been on lately (mainly Helm and Ribbon), which are more firmly damped even wide open.

You can make the fork fairly firm, if you want. I added a bit of compression and ran the IRT/main around 115psi(IRT)/78psi(main) and it felt very firm, similar to the Helm, where the fork wants to push into you a bit more and provide support. I'm running it a bit more compliant to ease pressure off my hands and help the bike track a little better, though, which was part of the reason for moving away from the Helm (which I liked a fair bit). I ran the Mezzer earlier today at 75psi/105psi with 2 clicks in the LSC adjuster and it felt really good, closer to where I'd want it anyway.

I've been doing all of my "testing"/tuning on the same trail, which consists of some faster rooty sections, a few fast corners, wall rides, slow drops, and a narrow bit with some awkward lines, one in particular always seems to induce dive in incorrectly setup forks. The first run down, with the recommended settings, I was pretty regularly hitting that last 30-40mm of travel. It wasn't abrupt, it felt alright, but there were a few instances where it came out from under me, I think it also had to do with the bike geo being a bit more forward than I'm used to. I think if I had run my shock a bit lower, it probably would have balanced out fine. The second time around, I ran the highest setting I've tried (78/115) and it felt alright, but it was spiking a bit more than I'd like and felt closer to the Helm, so very supportive and responsive, but a bit more firm than I'd like. I backed off the IRT 10psi and it felt more compliant, but still a bit harsh, so I went down a few psi in the main and it felt like a really good balance. I tested all of those with the adjusters open and rebound at a set 3 clicks from closed.

I think I have a good idea of the bounds on the spring now, so the next thing I'll work with is the damper settings. I'll probably do that some later this week, going back to the base recommended setting I was at and adding 5-6 clicks of LSC and 1-2 of HSC to see how it feels. I think some of that dive feel with it at 25% would have been mitigated by proper damper adjustments, but we'll see.
 

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For sure. I've been using a digital, but it appears with this fork even 3-5psi makes a difference, so a bit of variance on their end, a bit on mine, and it could have it settled in the travel more than it should be. They do recommend 20-25% on the tuning guide, the figure on the guide sat me right around 25%, as much as I can measure accurately and consistently, anyway.



I meant in comparison to the Helm, which is fairly firm even with all of the adjusters opened up. I haven't really played with the adjusters that much, I've made some 2-3 click changes in the LSC adjuster, but I've been experimenting more with the IRT and main pressures for the time being, since that system is somewhat new to me and I want to keep the other variables the same. The adjusters seem to have good range and make fairly broad adjustments, from my brief push test.

I also wasn't saying it was 'too soft', rather that it can be set up more compliant than some of the forks I've been on lately (mainly Helm and Ribbon), which are more firmly damped even wide open.

You can make the fork fairly firm, if you want. I added a bit of compression and ran the IRT/main around 115psi(IRT)/78psi(main) and it felt very firm, similar to the Helm, where the fork wants to push into you a bit more and provide support. I'm running it a bit more compliant to ease pressure off my hands and help the bike track a little better, though, which was part of the reason for moving away from the Helm (which I liked a fair bit). I ran the Mezzer earlier today at 75psi/105psi with 2 clicks in the LSC adjuster and it felt really good, closer to where I'd want it anyway.

I've been doing all of my "testing"/tuning on the same trail, which consists of some faster rooty sections, a few fast corners, wall rides, slow drops, and a narrow bit with some awkward lines, one in particular always seems to induce dive in incorrectly setup forks. The first run down, with the recommended settings, I was pretty regularly hitting that last 30-40mm of travel. It wasn't abrupt, it felt alright, but there were a few instances where it came out from under me, I think it also had to do with the bike geo being a bit more forward than I'm used to. I think if I had run my shock a bit lower, it probably would have balanced out fine. The second time around, I ran the highest setting I've tried (78/115) and it felt alright, but it was spiking a bit more than I'd like and felt closer to the Helm, so very supportive and responsive, but a bit more firm than I'd like. I backed off the IRT 10psi and it felt more compliant, but still a bit harsh, so I went down a few psi in the main and it felt like a really good balance. I tested all of those with the adjusters open and rebound at a set 3 clicks from closed.

I think I have a good idea of the bounds on the spring now, so the next thing I'll work with is the damper settings. I'll probably do that some later this week, going back to the base recommended setting I was at and adding 5-6 clicks of LSC and 1-2 of HSC to see how it feels. I think some of that dive feel with it at 25% would have been mitigated by proper damper adjustments, but we'll see.
I find it works very well 5-7 psi more than recommended and using lsc doesn't make it uncomfortable. At the moment i am using 6 clicks from open without issues, 1 click hsc.
 

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@adodero
Thank you for posting your experiences with the mezzer. On the Levo travel is 150. So I think the 180 of travel on the mezzer would significantly raise the front. That’s why I’m thinking of a fox 160 mm. Also I’m mostly doing trails so I’d prob stick w 51 offset since I am not doing dh. I like the ability large travel gives to deal with chunk ( large rocks and ruts that we have lots of here in the northeast) What bike geometry would the mezzer require?
 

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@adodero
Thank you for posting your experiences with the mezzer. On the Levo travel is 150. So I think the 180 of travel on the mezzer would significantly raise the front. That’s why I’m thinking of a fox 160 mm. Also I’m mostly doing trails so I’d prob stick w 51 offset since I am not doing dh. I like the ability large travel gives to deal with chunk ( large rocks and ruts that we have lots of here in the northeast) What bike geometry would the mezzer require?
You can lower the mezzer travel to 140 mm...10mm increments, using the provided spacers.

Offset has nothing to do with doing dh or not, you choose offset for bike handling characteristics. Although my experience as an amateur proves it's not that important, didn't feel big difference between 51mm and 46mm.
 

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@adodero
Thank you for posting your experiences with the mezzer. On the Levo travel is 150. So I think the 180 of travel on the mezzer would significantly raise the front. That’s why I’m thinking of a fox 160 mm. Also I’m mostly doing trails so I’d prob stick w 51 offset since I am not doing dh. I like the ability large travel gives to deal with chunk ( large rocks and ruts that we have lots of here in the northeast) What bike geometry would the mezzer require?
The Mezzer can fairly easily be adjusted down to 150 or 160 (range is 140-180), so you should be able to make it fit your Levo pretty easily. FWIW most forks can be travel adjusted, the mechanism just differs.

As for geometry, it's a fairly standard axle to crown, so I wouldn't say it requires any specific geometry. If it's the feel you want, which it sounds like it is (e.g. comparing to the 36), then it should replace any current similar fork on the market just fine.

I find it works very well 5-7 psi more than recommended and using lsc doesn't make it uncomfortable. At the moment i am using 6 clicks from open without issues, 1 click hsc.
Thanks for the info, good to know I'm not the only one bumping it up a bit.
 

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Thank you both for your replies. Although I too am an amateur, I just ride and don’t build bikes or do complex maintenance. Taking forks apart to remove spacers falls into that category for me. I’m sure I’ll have enough complexity just dealing with all of this forks’ adjustments - the double inlet valve is another thing (the IRT fills from the same port as the main chamber apparently) - how can you be sure which chamber you are filling ?

Although I enjoy the Levo I’m sure you young folks see it as an ‘adaptive’ bike. I miss the way I used to chuck my old stump jumper around (15 y ago) but I really like the way I can add a little help on those uphill slogs at the push of a button.

I am 210 lbs in full gear and don’t do jumps or downhill. My goal is to have a fork that can keep me on track as I go over big chunk. Currently the rockshox revelation dives quickly but then comes to a fast halt as it approaches the limit of its travel. What I am looking for in a fork is something that has a more linear deceleration. Is the mazzer overkill for my purpose? Is it ‘stiffer’ than a fox factory 36 (non ebike version?
 

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Thank you both for your replies. Although I too am an amateur, I just ride and don’t build bikes or do complex maintenance. Taking forks apart to remove spacers falls into that category for me. I’m sure I’ll have enough complexity just dealing with all of this forks’ adjustments - the double inlet valve is another thing (the IRT fills from the same port as the main chamber apparently) - how can you be sure which chamber you are filling ?

Although I enjoy the Levo I’m sure you young folks see it as an ‘adaptive’ bike. I miss the way I used to chuck my old stump jumper around (15 y ago) but I really like the way I can add a little help on those uphill slogs at the push of a button.

I am 210 lbs in full gear and don’t do jumps or downhill. My goal is to have a fork that can keep me on track as I go over big chunk. Currently the rockshox revelation dives quickly but then comes to a fast halt as it approaches the limit of its travel. What I am looking for in a fork is something that has a more linear deceleration. Is the mazzer overkill for my purpose? Is it ‘stiffer’ than a fox factory 36 (non ebike version?
The travel change process could likely be done by your shop or you could probably call Hayes and ask them to do it for you, if you bought it from them. It's not a difficult procedure, but it does require a few tools you may not have if you don't do your own bike work. Any competent shop should be able to take care of it, though.

The IRT and mains are filled through different valves. You have one at the bottom of the fork leg (main) and one at the top (IRT). Fill the IRT first, then the main. They have a chart on their site for recommended starting pressures, you are pretty close to me in weight, but you might also need to consider the weight of the bike itself. Your shop should be able to help you get sag set up, I'd look for 22% or so.

It sounds like a complicated system, but it isn't that difficult to use and you dont' have to fiddle with it as much as I do on different rides. It'll probably feel better than your Revelation even if the setup isn't ideal, I'm a bit more peculiar in getting stuff set up because I'm heavier (220), I have nerve damage in my hands, and I ride a lot of steep, technical terrain, so it's a real careful balance of providing support while keeping the fork smooth to relieve pressure on my hand. If you aren't that peculiar, then you don't need to tweak it as much as I have been.

I don't think it's overkill, the chassis is supposedly stiffer (feels stiff to me, I don't get the flex I do from other forks), and it'll definitely feel better than your Revelation. I haven't run a GRIP or GRIP2 36 yet, but I will add that the adjustments on the GRIP2 36 will be a bit more overwhelming if you don't like to tinker with suspension.
 

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Got my 180mm 27.5 37mm offset mezzer in a few days ago and had a good thrash on it in the bike park a couple days ago, in short, its pretty darn good.

I did pull it apart on arrival to check that grease/oil was where it needed to be and to check that everything was tight, did find a few things:

-foot nuts were finger tight... good thing i took it apart to look at it first!
-airspring seal head was also finger tight
-There was a sufficient amount of grease on the main air spring piston, but it was only on the top and bottom of the piston, and not the quad ring itself
-the irt piston had no grease on the shaft but did have sufficient grease on the outer seal
-clean, lots of bath oil, and the foam rings were nicely soaked


Assembled again after applying some grease to seals as necessary and snugged up air spring seal head and footnuts. Set pressure to about 50 psi main, and around 80 psi irt at 145lbs rider weight. Ended up with the rebound on the slower side at 2 clicks from closed, mainly because the jade on the back of the bike has much to slow rebound, even with the clicker full open, and there was a very large imbalance between the front and back of the bike. Compression ended up at 6 clicks from closed of LSC and 3 clicks from closed of HSC

I took it to SilverStar bike park, and proceded to do some trail raging to test. I have been riding my dh bike all year so hopping on the enduro bike always feels like its under gunned as I tend to ride it like my dh bike. So it gave me a good baseline for comparison for how the fork will perform for some good thrashing relative to the dh bike. (for reference sake the fork on the dh bike is a DVO emerald chassis which I converted to coil and have inserted the damper from a Bos idylle FCV with the FCV valve "deleted" and manitou evil genius 2 seals from a dorado, its basically a magic eraser)

The fork was really good, even better than I was expecting. The shim stacks for compression and especially rebound appear to be quite light, but certainly quite well suited for my weight, especiallly compared to stock tunes on many of the other products out there. Brake bumps were mostly erased, there was some vibration to the hands, but much less so than the mattoc pro boost that was on the enduro bike before but more vibration than the dh bike which produces almost no vibration on any kind of bumps. Could have done to run the rebound clicker a few clicks more open here but the bike felt too imbalanced with the jade on the back to do so. Big hits and jumps were dealt with very nicely with no drama, very little harshness, no feeling of bottom out, even though full travel was used many times. Large holes and big roots were also smoothed very nicely with minimal harshness (still need to open that rebound clicker a few more clicks for no harshness but the bike felt way to imbalanced with the slow jade on the back to do that), the fork simply just "gets out of the way" while riding through chunky terrain. Certainly no problem riding bike park for a full day with this fork and the hands still felt great at the end of the day. The fork was very quiet, it just kind of dissappeared and did its thing without any fuss. As whole, the fork is very impressive, certainly the best single crown fork I've ever ridden.

I have a different rear shock for the enduro bike on the way:D (the jade donsn't have a very tunable rebound setup without machining some new parts) the mezzer made the back feel so bad in comparison to the front, I think manitou pretty much nailed it with this fork. I will likely take the bike to the bike park again with the new shock and open up the rebound some more on the mezzer which should eliminate the smidge of harshness and vibration.
 

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mainly because the jade on the back of the bike has much to slow rebound, even with the clicker full open
I'm not sure what the deal is with the DVO shocks and their rebound damping, I'm considerably heavier than you (215-220) and I still found it too slow on the three shocks I've had of theirs. It made me feel like I was getting pulled off the back of the bike on some sections of trail and push/unweights felt really dead.

A few of the other forks I've owned fell into the same category, though, where high speed rebounds were really dead feeling or too slow returning. The Topaz matched up well for them. I don't really get that sensation with the Mezzer, though, which is nice, it feels a lot more responsive, which is closer to the SR Suntour forks I've had and oddly enough, one DVO.

I guess it's 'safer' to have it return slow than buck riders, but it makes the bike feel really poorly on natural terrain.
 

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Fork is on and bolted up. 27" 180mm, 37mm offset (44mm is the other option).

Took it apart to remove the travel spacer (was set to 170mm), these are very easy to work on, the lower leg nuts are much quicker and easier to line-up than the old threaded shafts.
The damper cartridge is bristling with bleed ports.
I got the feeling that a lot of features on this fork were dreamt up back in the early Mattoc days and it was only now they had the opportunity to fully implement them.

Bounce tests give me:
45psi main air spring, 80psi IRT.
Rebound 6 from closed.
LSC closed.
HSC open.

Feels just like an overgrown Mattoc so far. Is extremely smooth and free sliding out the box. We'll see how the riding goes. Damping feels very lively but the range I need is there right in the middle. HSC is a lot more subtle than Mattoc or Dorado as the preload spring is a lot softer.

Just awaiting player #2 so we can bolt up a 29" Mezzer and go shuttling!
 

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The Revelation is an old XC fork, 32mm stanchions, at 210# it is not enough fork, so pretty much anything will be better. Pike, Lyric, 36. Get something used and save some money.

So you got the base model Levo? I’m surprised Specialized used a lighter weight fork than a Pike, that’s a heavy bike and most ebike riders tend to be on the bigger side.

Thank you both for your replies. Although I too am an amateur, I just ride and don’t build bikes or do complex maintenance. Taking forks apart to remove spacers falls into that category for me. I’m sure I’ll have enough complexity just dealing with all of this forks’ adjustments - the double inlet valve is another thing (the IRT fills from the same port as the main chamber apparently) - how can you be sure which chamber you are filling ?

Although I enjoy the Levo I’m sure you young folks see it as an ‘adaptive’ bike. I miss the way I used to chuck my old stump jumper around (15 y ago) but I really like the way I can add a little help on those uphill slogs at the push of a button.

I am 210 lbs in full gear and don’t do jumps or downhill. My goal is to have a fork that can keep me on track as I go over big chunk. Currently the rockshox revelation dives quickly but then comes to a fast halt as it approaches the limit of its travel. What I am looking for in a fork is something that has a more linear deceleration. Is the mazzer overkill for my purpose? Is it ‘stiffer’ than a fox factory 36 (non ebike version?
 

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The Revelation is an old XC fork, 32mm stanchions, at 210# it is not enough fork, so pretty much anything will be better. Pike, Lyric, 36. Get something used and save some money.

So you got the base model Levo? I’m surprised Specialized used a lighter weight fork than a Pike, that’s a heavy bike and most ebike riders tend to be on the bigger side.
The revelation is 35mm now, and uses the Pike chassis. I've worked on a few of them fitted to Levo's and they can be either Moco or the new Charger RC damper
 
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