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Tonight we ride.
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steve3 said:
Or you can go over to the right or left of that and use Rotella Synthetic for $3 and some change. That's 5w-40, or you can go to any European parts supplier because 5w-40 is a common grade for European cars.
Or you can use 5w-20 or 30 if that's all you can find locally, because it really doesn't matter for the semibath.
 

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what the different in number the back after the 5W.
I'm think of getting the oil for my Marzocchi fork and everyone say go for 7.5W.
Since I can't get 7.5W, I'll go for 5W these time.
But what's the difference between the 20, 30 and 40?
 

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opticals said:
what the different in number the back after the 5W.
I'm think of getting the oil for my Marzocchi fork and everyone say go for 7.5W.
Since I can't get 7.5W, I'll go for 5W these time.
But what's the difference between the 20, 30 and 40?
It's different.

You're looking for 5wt fork oil, which is specific to shock dampers. Check out a local motorcycle shop if your LBS doesn't carry what you need (plus, a quart at your Yamaha dealer will cost you less than a half pint at the bike shop).

This stuff is synthetic motor oil and they're using it for the oil bath lubrication of the internals. The numbers means is behaves like a 5wt oil at cool temperatures and like a 40wt oil (or 20wt or 30wt) at warmer temps.

With your Marzocchi, you'll notice a difference between the 5wt and the 7 or 7.5wt oil you use in the damper. The heavier weight oil takes a greater force to push it through the ports, meaning you're fork will react a little slower than it does on 5wt oil. For a big guy or for particular fast and hard hits, this could result in a "smoothing out" effect of an otherwise overly energetic fork. Or, if performance is fine with 5wt, it could turn your fork into a slug. If you're not sure it might pay to experiment, or even mix a little 5wt with 7wt for something inbetween.
 

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Do It Yourself
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
opticals said:
Can I use the mobile 1 motor oil for my marzocchi open bath fork?
Don't use Mobil 1 in your Marzocchi. Like Nate said, go to your local motorcycle shop and get some 125/150 (7wt) synthetic fork fluid. If they don't have that, get 5wt and 10wt of the same brand and mix equal parts to make 7wt. Just make sure when mixing oils to use the same brand. Look for brands like Golden Spectro, Silolene, Maxima, BelRay, etc.

And if you absolutely positively can't find any of the above, some people use Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) in their forks. It's a bit thicker than the regular Marzocchi oil but would probably work okay especially if you are a heavier rider.
 

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Homebrew said:
Don't use Mobil 1 in your Marzocchi. Like Nate said, go to your local motorcycle shop and get some 125/150 (7wt) synthetic fork fluid. If they don't have that, get 5wt and 10wt of the same brand and mix equal parts to make 7wt. Just make sure when mixing oils to use the same brand. Look for brands like Golden Spectro, Silolene, Maxima, BelRay, etc.

And if you absolutely positively can't find any of the above, some people use Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) in their forks. It's a bit thicker than the regular Marzocchi oil but would probably work okay especially if you are a heavier rider.
Going off of what Homebrew said, except we don't reccomend use of ATF in the forks... It usually starts to gum up the internals. Plus, a lot of ATFs have seal swelling additives. Stick with a good quality motocycle fork oil and you will be set.

Brian
 
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