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Master of None
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a used Wotan, I think it is a 2008 (with the red sock sticker) and I did a few mods to it. Can never leave well enough alone. :p Sorry, no pics because I was feeling lazy.:madman:

The Albert Select damper had too much damping even in the lowest setting. I took apart the damper assembly on the top. The knob just pops off with the help of a flathead screwdriver. Unscrew the assembly from the fork. Remove a circlip from the top, remove the plastic the outer knob attaches to, and then remove the circlip under that. There is a small hole in the side of the outer assembly - line this hole up with the slot in the cam and turn the Albert Select adjuster until the hole in that shaft lines up with the other hole. Insert a small drill rod and tap out the roll pin on the other side holding the assembly together.

Slide the cam assembly off and the Albert Select knob will now fully unscrew. I took out the spring and cut two turns off, and then bent the spring bottom so it was flat again.

While reassembling, the roll pin can be lined up with one of two slots for the camming acting of the knob. To use the remote lockout use the slot that is straight. For the crown knob use the S shaped slot. It is possible to change from remote to crown adjustment with this, along with removing the torsion spring.

The knob now has a better range of adjustment. I'm using 5 clicks in right now, and it provides nice low speed damping giving the fork a solid feel, yet the smoothness through rock gardens is virtually the same as with the Albert Select turned off.


The second issue with my fork was sloppy bushings. The fork was hardly used, but the stanchions were quite loose. I'm used to my Manitou forks which all had tight bushings due to how Manitou actually sizes the bushings. I decided to replace just the upper bushings as those had the most slop. The bushings looked near new but it seems they were just oversized when manufactured. I replaced the upper bushings with some motorcycle bushings, the RaceTech# FMBO 36152 P. I sized the bushings with a bit of sandpaper and the fit was perfect. These are the outer bushings for a '90 Kawasaki EX500 motorcycle. They're a bit shorter (15mm vs 20mm) but they work fine. The RaceTech bushings are advertised as "Super Slick" which can't be a bad thing, eh?

After that I'm very pleased. The fork is very stiff and quite smooth with little stiction. The damping is just right.

One more thing, when installing the foot bolt on the rebound side, be sure to apply some non-hardening gasket sealer to the threads, or the semi-bath oil will wick up the threads and leak out the bottom of the fork. Ask me how I know this. :p
 

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wuss
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2,380 Posts
Wow, some really usefull information. I had a 2007 Wotan and as a light rider (under 70KG) the lowest settings of Albert was way too stiff. I understood they made it a bit softer for 2008 but could be wrong.
 

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dropadrop said:
Wow, some really usefull information. I had a 2007 Wotan and as a light rider (under 70KG) the lowest settings of Albert was way too stiff. I understood they made it a bit softer for 2008 but could be wrong.
That was just one of the issues with my Wotan (along with travel loss from air migrating into the negative and a broken spring on the travel adjust). I couldn't get any more than 4" of travel out of it even at the lowest recommended air pressure. It would be cool if they remedied that issue (I weigh 130 to 135 lbs fully geared up).
 

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squish is good
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Thread revival time, I'm trying to pop the lowers off my 07 Wotan (I imagine the procedure should be the same for all of them) but I'm not sure how to disconnect the damper cart from the bottom of the lowers. Does the red rebound cap pop off? There doesn't appear to be any bolts visible and I'm worried about taking a flathead to it. I've been getting quite a bit of oil weeping onto the stanchions so I wanted to take a look at the seals and replace all the fluid. I've overhauled Manitou and Marzocchi stuff but this has me a little perplexed right now.
 

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Code Burr
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1,382 Posts
An easier way to get to the spring is just to pull the piston assembly. The piston connects to the rod with a 12mm bolt. Remove the rebound shim spring and loosen the bolt. The bolt will come off, remove the shim, and then the albert valve and spring slide out of the rod.

I tried to remove the piston from the rod but couldnt. Tried boiling water to release the loctite but it didnt help. If anyone is interested, the OD of the shims are 26, 24, 22, 20, 18, 16. 110mm oil height for the Laurin.

x2 for the Albert Select being way too firm but after taking it apart today I know why.
 

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Master of None
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1,462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The red rebound knob pops straight off just like the blue Albert knob. It can be pretty tight, use two small flathead screwdrivers, one on each side and work it off. Once the knob is removed, the foot bolt uses a hex key (6mm?) for removal. Turn CCW (regular direction) for removal.

Be sure to clean and apply sealer to the threads of the damper side foot bolt upon reassembly. I used Permatex #2.
 

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squish is good
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Thanks presslab, thats what I was looking for, that knob is really sticky! I think I may have to go at it with a soldering iron for a minute before I try to pop it off, it's been beyond stubborn so far.
 

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Master of None
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1,462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Clutchman83 said:
Thanks presslab, thats what I was looking for, that knob is really sticky! I think I may have to go at it with a soldering iron for a minute before I try to pop it off, it's been beyond stubborn so far.
It's just a rubber o-ring in a groove that keeps it on. If you can get a drop of light oil up under the knob that will help. After oiling, work the knob up and down to get the oil in there.
 

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squish is good
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4,933 Posts
presslab said:
It's just a rubber o-ring in a groove that keeps it on. If you can get a drop of light oil up under the knob that will help. After oiling, work the knob up and down to get the oil in there.
In that case I'm gonna forget about heating it, melted rubber o-ring is no good, I actually flaked some of the metal trying to pry it off with the screwdrivers already, hope I don't have to send it in for warranty any time soon... they'd be able to tell it was messed with in a second.
 
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