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Discussion Starter #1
To rebuild my bike I had to cut the rear brake hose at the lever, route the hose through the seat post gusset, and re-attach an insert and olive. That part went fine but I lost the tiniest bit of fluid when I cut the hose. Now that everything is reassembled, the rear brake lever comes about 1/4 inch closer to the bar than the front. It still works but I would like there to be less travel. I am guessing this is due to the small fluid loss right?

Can I simply turn the lever horizontal, remove the reservoir cover, carefully ad fluid, and then replace the cover? Or am I looking at a full bleed?
 

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Chilling out
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Just add fluid, bleed not necessary.

Just did the same to my '04 brakes.

Check the docs on the magura site for proper setting of the fluid level, you use one of the plastic travel spacers put between the pistons IIRC during this. I'm a little fuzzy on the specifics right now.
 

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ballbuster
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I just read about a cool little trick...

Dave in Driggs said:
To rebuild my bike I had to cut the rear brake hose at the lever, route the hose through the seat post gusset, and re-attach an insert and olive. That part went fine but I lost the tiniest bit of fluid when I cut the hose. Now that everything is reassembled, the rear brake lever comes about 1/4 inch closer to the bar than the front. It still works but I would like there to be less travel. I am guessing this is due to the small fluid loss right?

Can I simply turn the lever horizontal, remove the reservoir cover, carefully ad fluid, and then replace the cover? Or am I looking at a full bleed?
... for Hydro Brakes.

First, remove the wheel and pump the brake lever so the pads touch (check to be sure this is okay with your brakes first). This moves all the fluid to the caliper. Then trim the lines and reattach. Carefully press the pads back into the caliper, keeping them straight (forcing the piston in when cocked can jam it, and I've found unsticking a piston is a major PITA). This will force any air bubbles out of your lines, saving you from bleeding your brakes.

I am new to hydraulic brakes myself, and have yet to try this trick. I do need to trim my front brake hose. It is rediculously long.
 

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Bodhisattva
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Hmmm....

I'm not sure that's a great idea.

Magura recommends that the pads be pushed all the way in flush with the calipers prior to cutting the line or removing the hose from the master.

And, unfortantely, I can attest from personal experience that not doing the above can introduce air into the line and lead to a bleed.

Despite magura's claims that cutting the line will not require a bleed if done correctly, I've found approx. 25% of the time a bleed is still needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Adding fluid

Sorry for the dumb question but are you adding fluid to the reservoir and simply putting the cap back on?

bear said:
Just add fluid, bleed not necessary.

Just did the same to my '04 brakes.

Check the docs on the magura site for proper setting of the fluid level, you use one of the plastic travel spacers put between the pistons IIRC during this. I'm a little fuzzy on the specifics right now.
 

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Chilling out
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Dave in Driggs said:
Sorry for the dumb question but are you adding fluid to the reservoir and simply putting the cap back on?
To be specific what I did...

- Took the wheel out
- Pushed the pistons all the way int
- Put the yellow travel clip in
- Pumped the lever to seat the pistons on the travel doohickie
( note: probably made a gaffe in not taking the pads out )
- Loosened the mount slightly so I could move the lever around
- Put a rag under the lever to catch any drips that escape
- Took the cap off the reservior
- Checked the bladder under the cap to make sure it was not distended
( one was, pressed it back to form )
- Added a couple drops of oil to top off the reservior
( about enough to bring the fluid w/in a few mm of the top )
- Slowly replaced the cap, holding it firmly to make sure that once the excess fluid escaped I didn't let any air back in.
- Screwed the cap back on
- Cleaned the lever by spraying some isopropyl alcohol and wiping it clean to get excess fluid off.
- Replace the wheel on the bike.
- Went riding.

:D
 
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