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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i'm googlin it and figured I might as well ask too.

when the lever reach on maguras is adjusted to reduce reach, should more fluid be pumped in?

and....

does everyone do the pump more fluid in with the pads and rotor in place?
one set of instructions mentions it and another doesn't.
 

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Magurified
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483 Posts
airwreck said:
when the lever reach on maguras is adjusted to reduce reach, should more fluid be pumped in?
No. The system volume is not changed, only the relationship (outside of the hydraulic system) between lever position and piston position is changed (by changing lever position only, not piston).

does everyone do the pump more fluid in with the pads and rotor in place?
one set of instructions mentions it and another doesn't.
Generally it is a good idea to remove pads when bleeding the system so as not to get oil on them.

However, is bleeding what you mean by "pump more fluid in"? The disc systems are an open system with reservoir, so as pads wear they automatically adjust... no additional fluid is required. With the magura brakes unless you get a hose breakage or leak, or get air in the lines whilst shortening lines, you never need to bleed them.
 

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No, that's not phonetic
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The yellow transport device that comes with Magura brakes has a fat end which simulates the thickness of a set of pads and a rotor. Take the pads out and slide that plastic thing in to do a bleed (if you need to, sounds like you don't).

You can adjust the reach all day long and it should have no effect at all on the system volume or pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks, makes sense on the levers.

as for the pads and rotor or transport device in the caliper during bleeds, it isn't really clear in the instructions whether there should be something in there or nothing. It just says push the pistons in. One set of instructions says that the last step is to put the pads in and mount the wheel with rotor, then push more oil in to compensate for pad wear. I've tried this and I've skipped this step also, and I'm wondering if doing it is the best way to decrease the lever movement needed.

Should the pistons be held in place by the fat end of the transport device throughout the entire bleed? I've only been using it to push the pistons in and then removing it during the bleed.
 
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