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stoneblender
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380 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I let the cat out of the bag in the lift-served thread, but figured that the news was big enough to warrant a thread of its own.

Get it here, http://www.madriverriders.com/mountain.html.

Yes, the map is finally out. After countless hours of volunteer work to get approval, build the trails and maintain them, we actually have a map of a bunch of the classic Valley bike trails. This map is currently free to all, but I encourage everyone that downloads it to contribute to the cause. You know you should. And we still need help with all these projects, so come to our work days!

We have not been able to start marking the trails and I don't have all the trail and parking descriptions done yet, so please be patient and realize that you may need extra time to figure stuff out. Look at the topo lines and make sure you are heading in the right general direction. If you have questions, ask. Also see last week's Valley Reporter for a good description of three loops.

Have fun!

John
 

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IMBA Canada
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844 Posts
I might be heading down again to your area next w-e... I'll call you for a tour if you're available... I'll be with a couple of friends and we'll like to do an epic loop on the first day and head maybe to Stowe again for the second day for a more relaxed loop with the girls...

Nice job with the maps!

Eric
 

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stoneblender
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380 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
And to help with navigation ... Courtesy of the Valley Reporter.

What Goes Up
By John Atkinson
©2007

(Some of ) The Best Bike Trails in the Mad River Valley
After many years of hard work by the Mad River Riders, we are now blessed with a great variety of legal bike trails, with some of the most challenging and beautiful routes in the region. And with Sugarbush opening for downhill biking, we’ve got the makings of a seamless system that covers all aspects of riding. From the high views and banked turns on Snowball and to the low rolling Mad River Greenway, dirt-based biking opportunities abound.

So here is a selection of some of the best of each flavor; mellow cruising, moderate singletrack, intense singletrack and downhill. All of these routes are made possible by generous private landowners, progressive partnerships with local, state and federal land managers and a huge amount of donated labor and resources. Please be very respectful of the lands you cross. Leave nothing but tire tracks and take nothing but pictures. Houses may be nearby, so try to keep your voices down. Stay on the legal trails. Say please and thank you often.

A word to the wise … with the exception of the lift-served stuff, these trails are maintained mostly by volunteers and may have hidden or new obstacles on them since the last work day. Be aware, conditions change minute to minute. Maintenance is on-going, but nothing is perfect. Only ride obstacles after you’ve them checked out. If you don’t like the looks of something, it’s okay to walk. Also, helmets and other protective gear are very smart.

The Mad River Riders are producing a map of the legal trails in the Valley and these fine routes are included on it. However, map or no map, navigation can be confusing. Plan extra time until you know them better. Take responsibility for your self and be prepared with food, water and tools. Please pick up trash. Remember to yield to pedestrians and smile as you pass.

Mellow Cruising
Mad River Greenway
The Mad River Greenway is great way to get a taste of mostly flat, non-technical trail riding. The Greenway, which will hopefully connect Moretown to Warren someday, is perfect for kids and an enjoyable pedal for all. This roughly three-mile section mirrors the Mad River and offers plenty of swimming spots for cool downs and refueling.

The trailhead for the longest stretch of the path is off Tremblay Rd, north of Waitsfield village. There is parking at the nearby Pines rest area and at the trailhead further up Tremblay Rd, but you can park anywhere in Waitsfield or Moretown and work the Greenway into a mixed paved/dirt/trail route to lengthen the ride. The other end of the trail is at Meadow Road, where there is also parking.

Austin Road is a quiet view-filled way (complete with a nice covered bridge) to Moretown or can serve as a loop back to Tremblay Rd. Get an area map, widely available, or better yet, pick up a Gazetteer.


Moderate Singletrack
Rt 17 > Marble Hill Rd > Class Four Rd. > Catamount Trail > German Flats > Rt17
For a good entry level loop with a good climb and a really fun moderately technical descent, start at Stark Mountain Bikes on the corner of RT 17 and 100. Ride up RT17, turn left on Marble Hill Rd and continue to the top. Head into the field at the end, onto the Class Four Rd, which keeps climbing gradually. Look for the blue signs of the Catamount Trail. Take a right and descend the CT and keep taking lefts to come out on German Flats Rd. Please follow the signs for a newly constructed bridge and reroute near the bottom.

Intense Singletrack
RT17 > German Flats > Catamount Trail > Sugar Run > German Flats > Sugarbush Access Rd > South Face Rd > Eurich Pond Trail > Hell Hill > Race > Ridgie > Class Four Rd > Tucker Hill Rd > Camel’s Hump State Forest > Enchanted Forest > Cyclone Connector > Cyclone > Dana Hill Rd > RT17
This is one of the classic MRV loops, with a tough trail climb to start and good selection of technical riding that the Valley is famous for. Start on RT 17, left on German Flats Rd. and then left onto the Catamount Trail across the new bridge. Climb the Catamount Trail all the way out to Sugar Run Rd. and then onto German Flats Rd again. Climb, then take a left onto the Sugarbush Access Rd.

Go left again onto South Face Rd and climb past the condos. Please be very respectful here. Look for a sign for the Eurich Pond Trail on the right. There is a dry trail on the sides of the muddy center trail that starts right at the bottom. Climb to Eurich Pond, follow the trail around to the left, at the first junction, just beyond the pond, take a right, then go straight through a 4-way intersection and climb Hell Hill, a series of steep pitches that is sometimes muddy and slick. Quite a few people can climb this without stopping, but most of us end up walking parts of it.

At the top, look for a left onto Race. Careful of the low-hanging sap lines at the start. Descend to the next intersection and take a right onto Ridgie. There are some options to explore, but they all converge back to one route further up the trail. Some of them are shortcuts, so if you want the whole thing, stay right at each junction. Cross under the power line with views north and south and continue to the Class Four Rd. Take a right and descend to the top of Tucker Hill Rd.

Go about 100 yards down and take a right into Camel’s Hump State Forest. The trail starts directly ahead and climbs gradually over several rock-lined sections and a couple of narrow bridges. Continue straight through the big four-way intersection with all the sap lines. Watch your head. Remember to smile through the pain.

The Enchanted Forest starts here and after a little descent and a short climb, there is a rolling swoopy downhill with good air-time possibilities. Take it slow until you know the route. At the next intersection, take a left onto Cyclone Connector and descend. Watch the steep waterbars and look for another left onto Cyclone.

Cyclone is tight, twisty and technical, with some small climbs mixed in with long downhill pieces. There are lots of spiny rock lines and off-camber turns that flow better as you get to know them. Expect to walk some stuff your first time down this trail. Follow the singletrack all the way down to a rocky exit onto Dana Hill Rd. Descend on the road to RT 17, just a few hundred feet down. Be careful here, the road is often wet, always steep and tends to wash-out frequently. The exit on to RT 17 is also tough. Go slow.

Downhill
Super Bravo > Valley House Traverse > Snowball > Racer’s Edge
It’s a little early to have a true favorite yet, but I am partial to the banked turns on Snowball and Racer’s Edge, switchback after switchback after switchback, linked with shaped berms and full of air-time potentials.

Go to Sugarbush, get a ticket, ride the chair, take a left and head on down! It’s a really long run spiked with sweet views and flowing downhill singletrack. After a few months, there may be a new favorite, but we’ll just have to do some test riding to see is something else is worthy.

And there you have it, a selection of some of the finest Mad River Valley mountain biking. What goes up …
 

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Free Valley Tour

Hello to all how want to experience the Mad River Valley singletrack.

I am offering a free tour to any riders who stay at our B&B. While that map is an incredible asset, I can save you a bit of time navigating the area. Check out our site http://wilderfarminn.com if you like what you see give a call or drop an email.
Hopefully it stops raining long enough for the trails to dry out.

Later

Luke
802-496-9935
800-496-8878
Wilder Farm Inn
 

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Registered
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3 Posts
atkinson said:
(Some of ) The Best Bike Trails in the Mad River Valley
After many years of hard work by the Mad River Riders, we are now blessed with a great variety of legal bike trails, with some of the most challenging and beautiful routes in the region. And with Sugarbush opening for downhill biking, we've got the makings of a seamless system that covers all aspects of riding. From the high views and banked turns on Snowball and to the low rolling Mad River Greenway, dirt-based biking opportunities abound.

Intense Singletrack
RT17 > German Flats > Catamount Trail > Sugar Run > German Flats > Sugarbush Access Rd > South Face Rd > Eurich Pond Trail > Hell Hill > Race > Ridgie > Class Four Rd > Tucker Hill Rd > Camel's Hump State Forest > Enchanted Forest > Cyclone Connector > Cyclone > Dana Hill Rd > RT17
This is one of the classic MRV loops, with a tough trail climb to start and good selection of technical riding that the Valley is famous for. Start on RT 17, left on German Flats Rd. and then left onto the Catamount Trail across the new bridge. Climb the Catamount Trail all the way out to Sugar Run Rd. and then onto German Flats Rd again. Climb, then take a left onto the Sugarbush Access Rd.

Go left again onto South Face Rd and climb past the condos. Please be very respectful here. Look for a sign for the Eurich Pond Trail on the right. There is a dry trail on the sides of the muddy center trail that starts right at the bottom. Climb to Eurich Pond, follow the trail around to the left, at the first junction, just beyond the pond, take a right, then go straight through a 4-way intersection and climb Hell Hill, a series of steep pitches that is sometimes muddy and slick. Quite a few people can climb this without stopping, but most of us end up walking parts of it.

At the top, look for a left onto Race. Careful of the low-hanging sap lines at the start. Descend to the next intersection and take a right onto Ridgie. There are some options to explore, but they all converge back to one route further up the trail. Some of them are shortcuts, so if you want the whole thing, stay right at each junction. Cross under the power line with views north and south and continue to the Class Four Rd. Take a right and descend to the top of Tucker Hill Rd.

Go about 100 yards down and take a right into Camel's Hump State Forest. The trail starts directly ahead and climbs gradually over several rock-lined sections and a couple of narrow bridges. Continue straight through the big four-way intersection with all the sap lines. Watch your head. Remember to smile through the pain.

The Enchanted Forest starts here and after a little descent and a short climb, there is a rolling swoopy downhill with good air-time possibilities. Take it slow until you know the route. At the next intersection, take a left onto Cyclone Connector and descend. Watch the steep waterbars and look for another left onto Cyclone.

Cyclone is tight, twisty and technical, with some small climbs mixed in with long downhill pieces. There are lots of spiny rock lines and off-camber turns that flow better as you get to know them. Expect to walk some stuff your first time down this trail. Follow the singletrack all the way down to a rocky exit onto Dana Hill Rd. Descend on the road to RT 17, just a few hundred feet down. Be careful here, the road is often wet, always steep and tends to wash-out frequently. The exit on to RT 17 is also tough. Go slow.

And there you have it, a selection of some of the finest Mad River Valley mountain biking. What goes up …
How long is this one? How many hours/miles approximatively? Thanks!
 
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