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Did you know that California was 15th in the nation in reported cases of Lyme disease in 2003? This disease is mainly transmitted by the western black-legged tick. This tick has been found in 56 out of 58 counties in this state, and ticks have tested positive for Lyme disease in 41 counties. Studies have shown an infection rate of 1-2% for adult ticks and 1-15% for nymphal ticks, although the infection rate of nymphs in Mendocino County may be as high as 41%. Other tick-borne diseases (TBD's) may be carried by this and other ticks, including babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and bartonella.

Prevention strategies include avoiding brushing against grass, not sitting on logs or leaning against trees, wearing light-colored clothing and tucking pants into socks. Deet can be used on the skin, and clothing can be sprayed with permethrin.

Frequent tick checks are essential, especially in areas like creases of elbows and knees, hairline and groin. If you find an attached tick, proper removal maybe key to disease prevention. You should continue to check yourself for several days after exposure to tick-infested areas, since an engorged nymphal tick may be easier to detect. Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible with pointed tweezers and pull straight out, or use specially designed tick tweezers. Save the tick for testing.

Fewer than 50% of those who develop Lyme disease get a bull's-eye rash; many develop a flu-like illness. Some may only present with psychiatric or neurological manifestations.

Lyme symptoms can involve cardiac, ophthalmologic, musculo-skeletal, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. Known as the "great imitator," Lyme can be misdiagnosed as ALS, MS, lupus, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, or even Alzhermer's and autism.

For more information, you may go to www.lymedisease.org or contact Marisa Battilana at [email protected].
 

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SamIAm
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OMF-ing randomness....

so give me all your poisons, and give me all your pills, and give me all your hopeless hearts and make me ill. your running after something that youll never kill, if this is what you want then fire at will....
 

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yeah, uh............bikes
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I got rabbit fever (tuleremia) from a tick. Talk about random disease I will never hear of again. Took antibiotics and I didn't die......it was touch and go there for awhile, but I pulled through.
 

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Lime disease? thats easy...

Just get a tube or two of that Advantage stuff and have someone rub it between your shoulder blades then let it absorb for a day. You should be good to go for about 1 month. You might want to check with a vetrinary student to be sure its safe on humans. I don't see why it wouldn't be. Almost all human medical procedures (organ transplants) and drugs first had to be found safe for cats and dogs before we got to use them.

Heck, when I was doing a lot of prospective trail exploration during the spring and summer here in Tennessee I got 3 ticks per ride on average. One time I just stopped in the middle of some double track, sat down, and they (ticks) started raining down on me. Moral: don't stop moving during tick season.

By the way. DEET disolves spandex; cotton and (I think) pure nylon is safe. Jerzees with spandex will also disolve if DEET contacts them.

And, as a general precaution, keep your groin shaved so the little buggers can't hide out down there. As for your head: you will need to spend several lazy post-ride-hours with your significant other picking through your hair, pinching and eating all ticks she/he finds as you do the same for for him/her.

If you don't adhere to these precautions; well, don't say I didn't warn you.
 

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SNOWRIDER
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yes and Locktite has been known to cause cancer in the state of Cali.
sure glad I live in Washington
 

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long_strange_ride said:
Just get a tube or two of that Advantage stuff and have someone rub it between your shoulder blades then let it absorb for a day. You should be good to go for about 1 month. You might want to check with a vetrinary student to be sure its safe on humans. I don't see why it wouldn't be. Almost all human medical procedures (organ transplants) and drugs first had to be found safe for cats and dogs before we got to use them.
Probably not a good idea...here's what I dug up about imidacloprid (advantage). I'm pretty sure that regulations on what you give to animals are quite a bit more lax than those for humans.

Acute toxicity
The imidacloprid active ingredient is considered by the World Health Organisation to be moderately toxic. In laboratory animals, symptoms of acute (short term) oral exposure to imidacloprid included apathy and laboured breathing which lasted for five days. The LD50 for imidacloprid (an oral dose that results in mortality to half of the test animals) is 450 mg/kg body weight in rats and 131 mg/kg in mice. The 24-hour dermal LD50 in rats is >5,000mg/kg. It is considered non-irritating to eyes and skin from tests on rabbits10.
Symptoms following acute exposure to the agricultural imidacloprid formulation (imidacloprid and inert product) included reduced activity, lack of coordination, tremors, diarrhoea and weight loss. Some symptoms lasted up to 12 days after exposure, twice as long as the symptoms of exposure to the active ingredient imidacloprid alone11.

Chronic toxicity
Chronic feeding studies with rats showed that the thyroid is especially sensitive to imidacloprid. Thyroid lesions were caused by doses of 17 mg/kg of body weight per day in males. Slightly higher doses of 25 mg/kg per day reduced weight gain in females. At still higher doses such as 100mg/kg per day, effects included atrophy of the retina in females12.

Mutagenic effects
Imidacloprid may be weakly mutagenic13. In tests of the ability of imidacloprid to cause genetic damage submitted to the EPA as a part of the registration process, no evidence of genetic damage was found, or evidence only at high exposures. However, a new technique that looks at the ability of a chemical to cause genetic damage by chemically binding to DNA found that the imidacloprid insecticide Admire, increased the frequency of this kind of damage. DNA adducts (the binding of a chemical to DNA) were five times more common in calf thymus cells exposed to Admire than in unexposed cells14.

Reproductive effects
Laboratory studies on imidacloprid have shown it can have an impact on reproduction. Imidacloprid fed to pregnant rabbits between the sixth and eighteenth days of pregnancy caused an increase in the frequency of miscarriages and an increase in the number of offspring with abnormal skeletons. These effects were observed at a dose of 72mg/kg per day. In rats, a two-generation feeding study found that rats fed imidacloprid gave birth to smaller offspring; their weight was reduced at a dose of 19 mg/kg per day
 

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Slayer77 said:
Did you know that California was 15th in the nation in reported cases of Lyme disease in 2003? This disease is mainly transmitted by the western black-legged tick. This tick has been found in 56 out of 58 counties in this state, and ticks have tested positive for Lyme disease in 41 counties. Studies have shown an infection rate of 1-2% for adult ticks and 1-15% for nymphal ticks, although the infection rate of nymphs in Mendocino County may be as high as 41%. Other tick-borne diseases (TBD�s) may be carried by this and other ticks, including babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and bartonella.

Prevention strategies include avoiding brushing against grass, not sitting on logs or leaning against trees, wearing light-colored clothing and tucking pants into socks. Deet can be used on the skin, and clothing can be sprayed with permethrin.

Frequent tick checks are essential, especially in areas like creases of elbows and knees, hairline and groin. If you find an attached tick, proper removal maybe key to disease prevention. You should continue to check yourself for several days after exposure to tick-infested areas, since an engorged nymphal tick may be easier to detect. Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible with pointed tweezers and pull straight out, or use specially designed tick tweezers. Save the tick for testing.

Fewer than 50% of those who develop Lyme disease get a bull�s-eye rash; many develop a flu-like illness. Some may only present with psychiatric or neurological manifestations.

Lyme symptoms can involve cardiac, ophthalmologic, musculo-skeletal, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. Known as the �great imitator,� Lyme can be misdiagnosed as ALS, MS, lupus, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, or even Alzhermer�s and autism.

For more information, you may go to www.lymedisease.org or contact Marisa Battilana at [email protected].
my buddy took a spill at Kent-r one day and when he got down to the gate like 10 mins later he took another spill. then he took off his shirt to see how bad he hurt his shoulder and there was a tick!

i called over his brother and he pulled/puched (popped) the tick out....

the tick was just getting in at that time....so no disease. :)
 

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California is ranked 15th in the nation in terms of the actual number of cases, correct? Where does California rank in terms of population? Looking at these things in terms of cases/100,000 (or whatever) people is a lot more useful, and would put California way down in the rankings (ie: don't flood the streets in panic).

I'm not saying that you should sit there and watch the ticks burrow into you for fun, but don't fly into an panic if you get one and buy flea/tick/heartworm medications made for dogs either.
 

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Who are the brain police?
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Deet & permethrin. I love and hate 'em both. Better than disease though...
 

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Glad to Be Alive
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Lyme disease sucks. It slowly takes away your energy. We had a local rider who was mis-diagnozed (sp) . Many proplems untill they found out what it was. Always check yourself
 

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sucks that they never could get the vaccine to work, or rather work without having disastrous side effects. did the whole treatment several years ago and never had any arthretic side effects, but apparantly a LOT of people did. so i *might* be vaccinated against lyme's for a while, or it might have worn off, or I could come down with horrible arthritis within a couple years. who knows, even doctors I talked to WHEN I was getting the shots didn't seem to know whether I needed yearly booster shots or not. don't you just love being the guinea pig for medical science?? :p
 

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Slayer77 said:
Dante, I had the Vaccine too dude... I'm going to assume that it did nothing positive for me considering they pulled it off the market. Anyway, it does suck that they never got it to work.

Thanks
well, last I heard it was a) effective and b) might cause crippling arthritis.

great, I REALLY shouldn't have gone searching for the latest in problems... I was blissfully ignorant. :( http://www.canlyme.com/lymerix.html
 

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Not all ticks carry it; only...

Dear Ticks. They are very small. Pinhead small.

All the ones I was getting were the big black, spider-sized ones. They don't carry Lime Disease. The bite can cause some irritation and reddness. Possibly infection, especially if the body is pulled off, and the mouth parts remain in the skin.

So, if you find a small tick; keep it in a bag or jar or something so that if you get sick; you can have the tick tested.
 

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I used to get ticks all the time in the woods by my house, both deer and dog, and as soon as it became available I got the vaccine. . . which was later banned for having horrible side effects. . . guess I slipped under the wire, but I should be immune to that S$%#. Hooray for modern science.
 
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