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Hello Forum,

After spending gobs of money on my Mojo and another $100 on the link, I'd like to install this thing myself. Ibis says there are no installation instructions that come with it. I assume it's easy to do then?

Would someone please provide a step-by-step procedure? What tools are needed?

Thx
 

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holding back the darkness
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1,734 Posts
Um..... you'll need a 5mm hex wrench.
Let the air out of your shock. Use the 5mm to remove the old links. Put the new link in their place. Dab the bolts in a little loctite blue, screw 'em back in place. Make them tight. Pretty hard to screw it up. :)
 

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aka dan51
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6,022 Posts
You'll need a 6mm hex wrench too.

1. open a beer
2. remove lower mounting bolt for shock, and angle shock out of the way.
3. remove front bolts from existing links
4. move suspension forward until you can access the other link bolts, and remove them
5. remove the old links
6. slide the LL into place
7. lube or put anti-seize on the bolts, then put them all back in.
8. reconnect the shock
9. chug the rest of your beer (there should be a lot left since this should only take about 10 minutes. It should still be cold too. Unless you run into problems)

It's easier if you remove the rear wheel too.
 

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rangehound said:
Hello Forum,

After spending gobs of money on my Mojo and another $100 on the link, I'd like to install this thing myself. Ibis says there are no installation instructions that come with it. I assume it's easy to do then?

Would someone please provide a step-by-step procedure? What tools are needed?

Thx
if you have to ask, i think you should have a shop do it.

good luck

mx
 

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536 Posts
A quick question ? ;)
Isn't Ti prep really the same thing as silver or gold anti seize ? I read allot who ethier use anti sieze or lock tite. I thought lock tite had minimal corrosion resisting properties and maximum locking properties while anti sieze was just the opposite.
Anyway, with the really delicate ti parts and locking into the threads, I used tons of anti sieze all around the moving intersections and all the way down the threads to the head and then just a tiny bit of red loctite on the end and really pinky tightening.
After several removals and re-installs that seems to work really well.
Also, I did the same with the alloy shock bolt but added a hard to find (and xtra machining) washer to it since it did not come with one. (Made sense to me, [even though I am really reducing my gorrila tightening] since the head of the shock bolt bottoms onto the carbon.)
 

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Rockhead
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5 Posts
Installing Lopes Link

I just got my Lopes Link and went through the install. No instructions were included but it is pretty easy to do.

-Uninstall the shock.
-Remove the old upper links.
-Orient the Lopes Link so the two arms point straight up, then the Lopes Link will slide into the mount.
-Rotate the Lopes Link to attach the arms to the mounting points on the chain stays.
-Reinstall the shock.

If you have the shock connected while you try this install you won't be able to tighten the bolts that attach the arms of the Lopes Link to the chain stay mount (well actually you can just barely but you won't be able to get it fully tight and you'll scratch the clear coat). I guess you could just remove the lower shock mount, but that just leaves the shock flopping around. Plus I wanted to be able to clean up all the gunk that has accumulated at the mounting points over the past year.

IMHO, this is the time to remove the lower link as well and clean everything up, make sure everything is in working order etc.

I've had my Mojo for a year and this was the first time I pulled the whole thing apart. I was impressed with the engineering details and incredible tolerances. When I ordered the Lopes Link I also ordered a new Lower Link and the TI bolt kit. I'm glad I had the new lower link as the bearings were getting a little rough, there's only so much mud and dust bearings can put up with. I'm sure they would have lasted another year or two but I could feel a few rough/tight spots in them.

If you get the TI bolt kit make sure you use some anti-seize during the assembly. And for the non-ti bolts make sure you have some blue Loctite on hand for the two lower link main attachment points.

I was a little nervous when removing the larger of the two lower link bolts (the one closest to the crank). The thread locker applied at the factory was very effective, and the bolt was very hard to remove. It made a lot of ominous noises, but after a few moments of hesitation, I went ahead and muscled through it, came out no problem.
 

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rockhead77 said:
When I ordered the Lopes Link I also ordered a new Lower Link and the TI bolt kit. I'm glad I had the new lower link as the bearings were getting a little rough, there's only so much mud and dust bearings can put up with. I'm sure they would have lasted another year or two but I could feel a few rough/tight spots in them.

If you get the TI bolt kit make sure you use some anti-seize during the assembly. And for the non-ti bolts make sure you have some blue Loctite on hand for the two lower link main attachment points.

I was a little nervous when removing the larger of the two lower link bolts (the one closest to the crank). The thread locker applied at the factory was very effective, and the bolt was very hard to remove. It made a lot of ominous noises, but after a few moments of hesitation, I went ahead and muscled through it, came out no problem.
I just redid all my link bearings, and it went well with the upper link, but in the process of removing the lower link, I buggered up the (don't know the name for it) attachment point on the frame for the larger (front lower) pivot point. It still feels solid after finishing, but the edges on the lower link are quite sharp, and as I fiddled with it trying to get it off, it shaved off pieces of the outside edge of the pivot attachment. I'd take recommendations (I was being stupid in not have the rear triangle out of the way).
 

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Reviewer/Tester
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6,176 Posts
Ti bolts can seize up tight on you, and I mean tight, unless you use some anti-seize compound on them...on the whole length of the bolt.

So much that it takes a huge amount of effort to remove them, usually resulting in some damage to the frame or component.

If you are worried about the bolt loosening off, then a very small dab of Loctite on the inside of the nut or component thread end is usually enough to keep everything buttoned up, but I prefer just to use anti-seize alone and keep up your maintenance schedule.

In the case of the Mojo Ti bolts, anti-seize the whole bolt, thread and all with a light coating to stop the bolt from gripping onto the bearings, etc.

R.

mtbnj said:
Out of curiosity, why should you not use locktite on Ti bolts?
 

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Rainman said:
Ti bolts can sieze up tight on you, and I mean tight, unless you use some anti-seize compound on them...on the whole length of the bolt, so much that it takes a huge amount of effort to remove them, usually resulting in some damage to the frame or component.

If you are worried about the bolt loosening off, then a very small dab of Loctite on the inside of the nut or component thread end is usually enough to keep everything buttoned up.

R.
good info. thank you!
 
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