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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of you riding in loose rock conditions, what’s your technique on tight trail with loose gravel and broken rocks?
If that happened on fire roads where I can see the run off at the bottom, I would just sit back, bomb down and let the suspension soaked it up; but when it comes to twisting single tracks, I tend to wondered and got bounced around, eventually lost balanced to one side. It is tough to carry enough speed on top of the gravel and at the same time make turns with little traction, any recommendation to safely and gracefully pass through those nasty stuffs?
 

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I'd say one key thing is to make sure that your tire pressures aren't too high - the lower the better - so as to help you from bouncing off rocks when you hi them instead of rolling over them. Also helps with grip in the rocky, gravelly stuff also helps by making rolling resistance a bit higher and therfor slower (help with the speed side of it). Use your back brake maybe to help turn the bike.
 

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I was watching the Ned Overend video last week and they have a section on switchbacks. They say don't use the front brake while turning or your front wheel will wash out, but they don't explain what to do...they just do it.

There is a section of trail that I ride often and I always stuggle because it's steep with a few switchbacks in a row and is very tight (over loose rock/gravel). I tend to use the rear brake during the turn as I feel I'm going to fast, but then of course the rear wheel is sliding all over the place and I feel out of control.

That being said, the advise I've seen - use the brakes before the turn to reduce speed, during the turn you should be off the seat with the bike angling around the turn but your upper body over the tire contact points...then as you finish the turn (and quickly gaining speed), use the brakes again to reduce speed. Lastly, easier said than done, try to brake on smoother sections if they exist, instead of loose stuff.

Good luck.
 

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noonievut said:
I was watching the Ned Overend video last week and they have a section on switchbacks. They say don't use the front brake while turning or your front wheel will wash out, but they don't explain what to do...they just do it.

There is a section of trail that I ride often and I always stuggle because it's steep with a few switchbacks in a row and is very tight (over loose rock/gravel). I tend to use the rear brake during the turn as I feel I'm going to fast, but then of course the rear wheel is sliding all over the place and I feel out of control.

That being said, the advise I've seen - use the brakes before the turn to reduce speed, during the turn you should be off the seat with the bike angling around the turn but your upper body over the tire contact points...then as you finish the turn (and quickly gaining speed), use the brakes again to reduce speed. Lastly, easier said than done, try to brake on smoother sections if they exist, instead of loose stuff.

Good luck.
Good point. Front brake is your enemy on loose rock. At least be very ready to release it if the front tire starts to slip sideways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Standing

shiggy said:
Stay loose and balanced over the bike. You are better off standing than sitting.
That might be the key that I overlooked, I knew the drill but sometimes the full-suspension bike make me feel too comfortable sitting on the saddle. Braking timing is another tricky part indeed...
Thanks for you all
 
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