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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a hardtail frame that has these features.

1. Uses a standard headset (ie requires bearing cups of some sort).
2. Threaded bottom bracket.
3. Disc brake mounts (any standard is fine).
4. Intended for 26" wheels.
5. Rear quick-release dropouts.
6. No bending of the downtube near the headtube (a common design feature I not only find to be ugly, but unwise as well).
7. $500 - $1000 range (for the frame).

As for frame material, I'd much prefer aluminum, but would be willing to accept CF if need be. No steel. I'd gladly take titanium, but really I don't want to spend more than $1000 for this frame.

I also prefer a replaceable derailleur hanger, but will accept one without it if push came to shove.

Can any of you folks suggest a manufacturer or frame, and a place to buy it (preferably online)?
 

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They make bikes with 26" tires now? Is that the new standard for folks who think 650b is too big? When does this end?

In-one Inbred?
 

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Sergeant Spandex
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You will have a vast array of options on the used market. Also there are plenty of aluminum 26er frames from the big boys but most of those are the entry level frames which I am sure is not what you are after.

Just out of curiosity why Aluminum? Not that it is a bad frame material but certainly not my favorite.
 

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The On One Inbred 26er with vertical dropouts would be your best bet, although it is steel. It's a very inexpensive price even with shipping from the UK. The Surly Troll is another good one, but it comes with a fork, is steel, and has horizontal dropouts that are a pain if you run gears. I'd get one of those, but here is the exact frame you are looking for (and it's cheap too):

Nashbar 26" Mountain Bike Frame - Mountain Bike Frames
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
68 with a 120, so a 100 might get you 69? Smaller tire might get it slightly steeper as well
I have a Mountain Cycle Rumble with a 71-degree headtube and 100mm fork.

I'm wondering if slacker headtubes on DH and FR bikes are making their way to XC hardtails now too.
 

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Maybe check the Niner site? Don't they make steeper HTs, and they may have aluminum HT that they sell as a frame?
 

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The older Specialized M2 Stumpjumper frames hit everything on your list but the disc brakes. They typically sell for $100-$200 on eBay and there are disc adapters available. Very light and rigid with the older style geometry.
 

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It is obviously your money, but I can't imagine spending up to $1000 for an aluminum 26er frame. If you can buy used, or at least ebay, you could probably find a new or nearly new frame for a lot less. My advice is always to look at reviews on potential older frames, check out pics and bike geometry because you can't test it until you build it.

You may want to figure out the fork and travel and work your way from there. If you want 80mm or 100mm you may have to buy used.

John
 

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I have a Mountain Cycle Rumble with a 71-degree headtube and 100mm fork.

I'm wondering if slacker headtubes on DH and FR bikes are making their way to XC hardtails now too.
XC hardtails have gone to a different size wheel over the years. Then they have gone to a fork with more offset(51mm) so a slacker head tube angle with more fast downhill stability doesn't slow steering. They curved the down tube at the head tube to give wheel clearance and shorten the wheelbase for quicker steering. They shortened the chainstays and curved the lower seat tube to further shorten the wheelbase and give rear wheel clearance. Now if you pick a carbon frame with all those features some manufacturers are including rear compliance with the light weight of carbon.
No one is putting that effort into 26" hard tails.
Trek uses compliance engineering info from their road bikes on the Superfly carbon frames. It's broadens the difficulty of terrain it can handle while retaining trail feel.
The Titus Fireline Evo is 29 with slack ht angle under $1k for titanium.

It would probably be useful to borrow a friend's XC 29 or do a demo day for some first hand info.
 

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Air Pirate
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Probably a good idea to back up this selection process with the question: What is your intended use for this frame? Racing, bikepacking, commuting, all-around do-everything bike?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
XC hardtails have gone to a different size wheel over the years. Then they have gone to a fork with more offset(51mm) so a slacker head tube angle with more fast downhill stability doesn't slow steering. They curved the down tube at the head tube to give wheel clearance and shorten the wheelbase for quicker steering. They shortened the chainstays and curved the lower seat tube to further shorten the wheelbase and give rear wheel clearance. Now if you pick a carbon frame with all those features some manufacturers are including rear compliance with the light weight of carbon.
No one is putting that effort into 26" hard tails.
Trek uses compliance engineering info from their road bikes on the Superfly carbon frames. It's broadens the difficulty of terrain it can handle while retaining trail feel.
The Titus Fireline Evo is 29 with slack ht angle under $1k for titanium.

It would probably be useful to borrow a friend's XC 29 or do a demo day for some first hand info.
Yeah, I always wondered about 29'ers. I am amazed that they have becomeso popular. I'm wondering why that's the case.
 

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I was talking to a neighbor and he rides a 29er, he is also over 6' so that is an added benefit, and he basically said you would be amazed at how much you can roll over on a 29er that is more difficult on a 26er.

I really think so much of it comes down to where a person rides and the terrain.

John
 
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