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#1 Latex Salesman
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can you put a longer travel rear shock on an '05 FSR XC comp? I believe the stock one is 4" travel.
 

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The stock rear shock on an 05 FSR XC is...

a 6.5 eye to eye by 1.5 inch stoke. This is how shocks are measured. It means from one mounting eye to the other is 6.5 inches, and the shock compresses from full extension to bottom out 1.5 inches. It is not adviseable to put a longer shock on the bike. The suspension linkage and such were designed around that particular shock size. Adding a longer stroke shock can lead to clearance issues with the frame and suspension components. That being said, it can be done. But results are hard to predict. The next larger shock to your stock set up is a 7.5x1.75. This will add a total of 1 inch to your shock length, change the geometry of the bike a bit, and you'll only be getting around an 18mm travel increase. If you were to go with a 2 inch stroke shock you could get an additional 30mm of travel out of it. But like I said before, it isn't recommended by Specialized for sure. It is an expensive experiment that may or may not work out! And it may not be good for your bike either. Anyway, if you want more travel out of the bike give it a try. But once you have the new shock installed you need to make sure that you have NO CLEARANCE ISSUES when the suspension is a full extension or full compression. If ANY part touches any other at ANY time the mod is a NO GO!!! Contact between parts that aren't supposed to touch each other is BAD!

Anyway the bottom line is, the FSR XC was designed to have a 6.5 x 1.5 shock on it, which renders about 4" of travel. It performs best in this configuration. By increasing your shock length and stroke you may well compromise that peformance. And it may not be doable at all should you have clearance issues. And you could end up voiding one of the best frame warranties in the business. You can try it if you want. But for my money if you want a longer travel bike, get one. Leave the FSR as it is. It's a fine bike for it's intended purpose, XC/Trail. There is no real reason to increase the travel of the bike and risk any problems. Use it as intended and have fun with it. The increase in travel isn't worth the possible headaches.

Good Dirt
 

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Squash said:
. It's a fine bike for it's intended purpose, XC/Trail. There is no real reason to increase the travel of the bike and risk any problems. Use it as intended and have fun with it. The increase in travel isn't worth the possible headaches.

Good Dirt
I beg to differ, where I ride in the peaks in the UK most trails have football size boulders and I found the following upgrade great for my FSR XC. First Fox Vanila 130mm Fork, then a new linkage from BETD to increase the rear travel to 130mm thus keeping the head angle on my bike the same. now I have a gr8 5" travel XC bike for a low price.

BETD's links are here, (Far superiour qaulity to the orignal one btw)
 

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Yup you sure do, and you have also increased the...

simonm said:
I beg to differ, where I ride in the peaks in the UK most trails have football size boulders and I found the following upgrade great for my FSR XC. First Fox Vanila 130mm Fork, then a new linkage from BETD to increase the rear travel to 130mm thus keeping the head angle on my bike the same. now I have a gr8 5" travel XC bike for a low price.

BETD's links are here, (Far superiour qaulity to the orignal one btw)
compression ratio of your rear suspension to somewhere in the neighborhood of 3.2 to 1. The very reason I did not mention that "upgrade". Not knowing the original posters weight, I could not in good consience recommend it. The higher compression ration requires higher air pressure or increased spring rates for a give rider weight to perform properly. If the original poster runs heavier than 200 lbs, the additional pressure required to achieve proper sag, could well be more than the max pressure recommendation of the shock. I know this from experience. At 230lbs I can't use anything with a compression ratio beyond about 2.8 to 1 or I start pushing the shock beyond it's capabilities. The BETD link is a great option for lighter riders, however not knowing someones weight, I wouldn't recommend it. If he's a lighter to average rider then something like that would work fine.

That's besides, he was asking if he should but a longer shock on the bike, not add a BETD link. The link uses the stock shock, but changes the compression ratio to get the additional travel so it is not the same thing. The link has been tested and manufactured to work properly with the bike involved. Anyway, Nuff Said.

Good Dirt
 
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