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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings from Egypt to all mtbr on here ..
this is my first post,im willing to get my first hardtail pretty soon,i've been advised to get a bike with a fork lockout option . since my majority of riding will be on moderate-smooth streets beside about 20% off road .
im obsessed with mtb , i dont want to shift to other category..and i dont want to sacrifice the gearing when i need to enjoy a race.

my question is: does the front suspension consume my pedaling instead of putting it into gearing,hence a lockout fork will be much useful when on smooth terrain ? or it doesnt make much difference?!

ive been looking on BD ,but all bikes with lockout fork,ran out of my frame size :( , hopefully they pack it on soon..
thanx in advance
 

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My little friends
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Hello! If you get a air fork, you can always add more air if you will be riding smooth surfaces. The rear suspension can waste more energy while peddling than the the front suspension. I never lock out my fork, but I do lockout the rear when I have to ride up gravel roads.
 

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Right, the lockout feature really is for going up steep climbs help transfer the energy and keep front wheel planted...
Going from Spring to Air is WAY more important!
Good Luck out there in Egypt..if I dug straight thru the EArth I might pop out next to you :-O LOL
RIDE!!!!!
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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Lockouts are overrated.

If you experience a lot of pedal bob then yes, you lose energy. With good technique and a functional rebound damper, it'll be pretty insignificant. I don't notice it when I ride my hardtail a couple miles to the trailhead, but it used to be a problem with the really crappy fork that bike came with.

Since getting a shiny new bike with a compression damper, I can climb out of the saddle with very little bob. Since it's there anyway, I use the lockout on the way to a trailhead. But I can (and often do) set the damping where I like it and then not touch it for the entire ride.
 

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LOL
Spring type fork is just that only a spring inside.
Air type fork has air pressure inside so the more air the tighter the fork is.

Air forks perforem way better because you can match your body weight in PSI for best performance racing/off road/around town...whatever life brings you..

Spring is just a spring = Pogo Stick
 

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thanx , but have you been into race or gearing with front fork on/off ? have you felt any difference ?
My trails have sharp short ups and downs generally. Too short to mess with locking and unlocking 50 times. You can imagine some situation in an Olympic competition where a lockout would be part of your competitive plan to eek out every inch of benefit. That isn't part of my more trail oriented riding technique. I like to concentrate more on trying for the best line through difficult terrain features on a personal challenge level.
I could lockout during the several miles on the return to the trailhead area on rolling two track. But that is more of a relaxing fun time to wind down and just go fast for fun. I'm not often racing anyone. And when I am the triple I use lets me out spin the guys with doubles even if they use a lockout.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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thanx , but have you been into race or gearing with front fork on/off ? have you felt any difference ?
I do race. Yesterday, in fact. And I never touched my lockout.

Truth is, mountain bike racing is faster and more dynamic than I think people expect before they try it. So the fewer things I have to distract me from keeping my bike pointed down the trail and putting power down, the better.

It helps that modern, XC-oriented suspension components are already very efficient. A good rebound damper gets me most of the way there, but I also have my compression damper a couple clicks in most of the time. I turn it off for developed downhill lines, but that's about it.

For me, lockouts are a solution to a problem that's better solved by good damping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I do race. Yesterday, in fact. And I never touched my lockout.

Truth is, mountain bike racing is faster and more dynamic than I think people expect before they try it. So the fewer things I have to distract me from keeping my bike pointed down the trail and putting power down, the better.

It helps that modern, XC-oriented suspension components are already very efficient. A good rebound damper gets me most of the way there, but I also have my compression damper a couple clicks in most of the time. I turn it off for developed downhill lines, but that's about it.

For me, lockouts are a solution to a problem that's better solved by good damping.
thanx bro, well said
May you give me your bike model or the fork specs ?
 

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A front lockout makes a huge difference when out of the saddle on roads - I use mine a lot on road sections. I do understand the desire for simplicity, and if you are in the saddle the whole time then there isn't much difference anyway - but once you get out of the saddle the lockout enables you to pedal much more efficiently. If you are on roads 80% of the time then I would recommend a lockout. On singletrack I never have the fork locked out.
 

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Picture Unrelated
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I'll add something in a second but I will concur that lockout is overrated. I've had it on several bikes and have almost never touched it. Adding a little more preload to the fork would accomplish what you're looking to do.

There is a huge difference between the lockout system on an expensive fork and the lockout on a cheap fork. Expensive forks have hydraulic lock out systems with blow off valves; that means that the system keeps fluid from passing through it which locks the fork but if you hit a big bump the fluid can bypass the lock which keeps the system from breaking in addition to soaking up the bump a little bit. Cheap forks sometimes use non-blowoff hydraulic systems or mechanical lock outs which can break if you hit a pot hole or run off of a curb. Knowing a little bit about the internals of the forks you are considering can go a long way toward knowing if you want to pick one over another.

I would suggest taking a look at the various forks you are considering and seeing if you can determine the differences. You'll learn a lot about air vs. coil sprung, high speed and low speed damping, rebound damping, and lockout. The more you know the better your decision will be. Personally, I'd ignore lockout and try to pick a fork with a more sophisticated damping system with some adjustment in it.

If you truly don't want the suspension to function then swap out to a rigid fork which gives you the benefit of saving a bunch of weight.
 

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I like turtles
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I think lockouts are overrated. I rarely use mine unless I am on pavement. Offroad it is more of a hassle to reach down and flip it on and off than the slight benefit justifies.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
THANK YOU guys for all your support, here's the bike im mostly getting in few hrs ,please feel free to give me all your advices
remember i was looking for a mountain bike that would still be my baby in a race !! :)
i've attached few pics , and this is the available specs .. let me know if you need to know more specific specs >

*frame material alloy
*suspension fork brand SunTour, with alloy with lock,
*Shimano group Olivio [ hand shifter 24 speed w/ front & rear shimano deraileur + freewheel + chainwheel shimano 3 speed,
*Tire & tube Kenda [small block eight],
*saddle brand Fox, handelbar and stem brand Henco,
*pedal brand VP [heavy duty], rims double wall alloy,
*brake [oil] brand Alhonga.
*Seat and wheels with quick release

THANK YOU!!
 

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Hey there, I recently got a Specialized Stump jumper (hard tail) with a Reba RLT 29 Brain fork. Question: Does the "Brain" eliminate the need to mess with the lockout while riding? I do a lot of single track climbing and descending with some technical areas on the way so I figured why not just keep the fork locked and let the "Brain" do the guesswork; I mean isn't that the point of the "Brain"? Thanks.

Edit: My theory is that the "Brain" was introduced as a replacement for remote lockout, right?

It's a Reba RL.
 
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