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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm fairly new to this all. I was wondering how exactly lock out shocks work? Do lock out shocks have the ability to be locked out when riding uphill or on flat land but be able to "unlock" when riding downhill? or does it constantly need to be adjusted to lock out when you want it to and not when you don't? Thanks
 

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Team Cspine
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That's it...

dragonboi said:
lock out shocks have the ability to be locked out when riding uphill or on flat land but be able to "unlock" when riding downhill?
...exactly. You should already have it tuned for your style then you just lock it out to prevent bobbing or pogoing uphill.
 

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dragonboi said:
Hello,

I'm fairly new to this all. I was wondering how exactly lock out shocks work? Do lock out shocks have the ability to be locked out when riding uphill or on flat land but be able to "unlock" when riding downhill? or does it constantly need to be adjusted to lock out when you want it to and not when you don't? Thanks
There's usually a lver that you flip to lock out the shock. It's not quite the same as turning it into a hardtail. There's always some movement, but it's limited.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Blue Shorts said:
There's usually a lver that you flip to lock out the shock. It's not quite the same as turning it into a hardtail. There's always some movement, but it's limited.
so basically do you have to constantly be flipping that lever to lock it out? such as i'm about to go uphill so i flip the lever and then soon after i'm about to go downhill and i flip the lever again?

or do you just flip it once and then you're set for uphill (which will make it like a hardtail) and downhill (where it the shock isn't locked out).
 

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Do It Yourself
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You have to manually switch it from locked out to unlocked. It's not automatic. If you want something that requires less rider involvement, try a platform shock such as Fox ProPedal, Manitou SPV, Progressive CVT, or my personal favorite PUSH Industries mods for Fox Shox.
 

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Homebrew said:
You have to manually switch it from locked out to unlocked. It's not automatic. If you want something that requires less rider involvement, try a platform shock such as Fox ProPedal, Manitou SPV, Progressive CVT, or my personal favorite PUSH Industries mods for Fox Shox.
I completely agree with Homebrew. Just remember....a platform is not a lockout. It will reduce bobbing, but it won't eliminate all movement if you stand and mash on the pedals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Blue Shorts said:
I completely agree with Homebrew. Just remember....a platform is not a lockout. It will reduce bobbing, but it won't eliminate all movement if you stand and mash on the pedals.
ah i see. these platform shocks, are they able to fully travel when i'm going downhill (say i go off a large jump and land will the shock fully travel) but when i'm riding uphil it will minimize bobbing almost to none?

basically what i'm wondering is, does it work in the way that it completly locks out under a certain pressure and then above that pressure it simply acts like a normal shock
or
does it work in the way that it is locked out under no pressure and as you increase the pressure on it, the shock will linearly act more like a normal shock.

thanks guy
 

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dragonboi said:
ah i see. these platform shocks, are they able to fully travel when i'm going downhill (say i go off a large jump and land will the shock fully travel) but when i'm riding uphil it will minimize bobbing almost to none?

basically what i'm wondering is, does it work in the way that it completly locks out under a certain pressure and then above that pressure it simply acts like a normal shock
or
does it work in the way that it is locked out under no pressure and as you increase the pressure on it, the shock will linearly act more like a normal shock.

thanks guy
The idea is the platform shocks work by frequency more than pressure - pedal bob is fairly slow (say 1-2 cycles/second), and is minimised by the platform damping. Hitting bumps at speed involves a higher frequency, so the platform "opens" and soaks them up almost like a normal shock (some older Propedals reportedly were a bit stiff over bumps). RP3 shocks allow the plaform to be adjusted for the rider's preference/weight/style etc.

If you're looking for efficient pedaling, but minimal switch-flipping, a platform-style shock is probably worth a few test rides.
 

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fsrxc said:
The idea is the platform shocks work by frequency more than pressure - pedal bob is fairly slow (say 1-2 cycles/second), and is minimised by the platform damping. Hitting bumps at speed involves a higher frequency, so the platform "opens" and soaks them up almost like a normal shock (some older Propedals reportedly were a bit stiff over bumps). RP3 shocks allow the plaform to be adjusted for the rider's preference/weight/style etc.
How do platform shocks open based on high frequency input? I see how you could an open dampener for low frequency but not high frequency (e.g. have a viscous fluid on the dampener shaft that "delays" the opening for high pressure).

I always thought they worked on pressure gradients (i.e. pressure). Pedal bob should lower be frequency then a rock on the trail but if both had the same amplitude then the pressure gradient is higher on the rock and you could "filter" pedal bob out via pressure.
 

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spinjocky said:
How do platform shocks open based on high frequency input? I see how you could an open dampener for low frequency but not high frequency (e.g. have a viscous fluid on the dampener shaft that "delays" the opening for high pressure).

I always thought they worked on pressure gradients (i.e. pressure). Pedal bob should lower be frequency then a rock on the trail but if both had the same amplitude then the pressure gradient is higher on the rock and you could "filter" pedal bob out via pressure.
Check out Fox's website, they have some charts showing damping for Propedal, and the units are inches/second (I think) no mention of force (lbs).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
fsrxc said:
Check out Fox's website, they have some charts showing damping for Propedal, and the units are inches/second (I think) no mention of force (lbs).
the graph on the website is force on the y and inches/sec on the x.



i like how they call that "tech explained" and they don't tell you what the force is (i'm assume force of pressure against the shock?) and what the inches/sec is (which could be velocity of the damping of the shock, or if there is some type of fluid in the shock it could be that..)

does anyone what this might be telling us or actually how technically these propedal shocks work?
 

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dragonboi said:
i like how they call that "tech explained" and they don't tell you what the force is (i'm assume force of pressure against the shock?) and what the inches/sec is (which could be velocity of the damping of the shock, or if there is some type of fluid in the shock it could be that..)

does anyone what this might be telling us or actually how technically these propedal shocks work?
I'm assuming the graphs are for force applied and max shaft velocity. Eg. at 30 lbs of force on the shaft = 0 movement. 60 lbs force = 4 in/sec shaft movement or 0.5 sec to move through a 2" stroke.

I'd guess there's a small shim covering the slow speed ports that doesn't "break away" untill there's ~ 50 lbs of force compressing the shock.
 
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