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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need your help... I did my first DH race last week and am hooked. If I'm going to invest in another bike I want to do be more than just a DH race bike. I was thinking a DH capable bike that I can bring to the resorts and light enough to do freeride and pedal if I need to. Does this exist?
I was looking at the Intense Uzzi VPx and the Yeti ASX. Are these burly enough for downhill?
Also- Where can I get armor for cheap?
Thanks-Bry
 

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i ride a howler......light, freeride, race on occasion...dh.....i like it - but then again im a relativly light rider soooo.... yeah

just throwin it out ther
 

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If it's your first downhill/freeride bike do the following....


Avoid Intense as it's just too much cash to shell out for your introduction to the big bikes. Everyone wants a Ferrari as their first car, or their first autocross or track car, but there's no point and you can have a helluva lot more fun saving the money you would have spent, or using that same money to go to some races or resorts.

My suggestion is to go to Performance (get thee behind me Satan!) and buy yourself a 2006 7Point3 for $1600 (ends July 1st and you need to be a Team Performance member which costs $20). Then slap a 888 or 66 on there straight away and go racing and riding. The 7Point7 is nice but you can get the same ride quality out of a 7Point3 that's been strategically upgraded.

In the end the bike can be spec'ed more for downhill (888, single ring), or for freeride and a bit of pedalling (66, dual ring). Great versatile bike.
 

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I was in the same position last fall, picked up a used (essentially brand new) AS-X on mtbr classifieds for $1200. Though I lust after bikes such as the Uzzi, the Yeti is a sweet ride. Definitely can handle the abuse of downhill racing, but overall better suited as a freeride rig.
 

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look into something reasonable....if you are only racing some and doing freeride and such look into an ASX or an SC VP Free. both DH capable with pedal ability and not very heavy. even something like an enduro SX trail would work if you are light weight or don't mind a bit less travel. for what you want to do...you have many many choices.
 

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Freeriding Feline
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I'm with EB. I'm also biased as I own a VP Free. But I was thinking something used, not beaten up but something you can get for a few $$$ less.
Have fun!
 

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when I was in yoru position i really looked into the santa cruz bullits, I don't believe they make them anymore but you can find them really cheap on ebay etc. However, I didn't have the $$$ at the time so I bought a Gemini, a great choice if you are on a budget, but not in the same league as the Uzzi, ASX, and bullit.
 

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RaggleMuffin said:
i ride a howler......light, freeride, race on occasion...dh.....i like it - but then again im a relativly light rider soooo.... yeah

just throwin it out ther
how does the howler do? i was looking at buying a used howler frame, but i thought it was really a 4x bike and not much else. i was looking at it to use as a small travel street/urban ride that i could throw on some dirt tires and bring to some rougher rides and jump. would it be able to handle fairly hard street riding?
 

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Hard as nails
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Transition Bikes

I have the Dirtbag. But the Gran Mal is impressive. Great company with an awesome warranty! The bikes can take a beating - take a look at the vids on the site of the rider owned (They ride their own sheot) on downhill freeride courses.... Cannot go wrong here! I know some may say - Brake Jack. But that is applicable to the majority of good/great bikes on the market.

See for yourself and check the review!:thumbsup: Good luck with whatever you go with!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the feedback. I like the idea of not spending 4-5G for a new bike. Would i be better off getting a cheaper bike (the 7point7 or 7point3) and upgrading, or buying a used frame from a better builder? It sounds like either way I should upgrade the fork...
Thanks!
 

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I went the Bighit route recently. Found a barely used 2004 frame on eBay and built it up for $1400 total. I’m only running a JuniorT due to budget and I put old drivetrain from other bikes on it. It doesn’t shift as smooth as my trail bike, but with a double up front it can climb and works well for freeride and lift served. I really like the 24” rear, I’ll never destroy it and I don’t notice any loss due to it. Also, I liked that the frame has a lot of adjustability from the rear suspension. You can run it with a slack HA and low BB for pure DH or high BB and less slack HA for freeride. I use the latter setting pretty much exclusively, because I find any trails other than Norba DH’s seem to have more switchbacks than super fast boulder fields. Also, it can be setup with anywhere from 6” to 8”+ rear travel depending on shock and mount location.

I totally agree about not buying a Ferrari. In a way, I will have a hard time justifying an expensive DH/freeride bike even if I’m killing it. These type of bikes need to be kinda disposable because they get beat on. I ride an Ellsworth for more mello rides, but I hate to put a scratch on it, let alone toss it into a rock garden. I can’t afford to replace it or even replace the expensive components on it very often. It would slow my progression if I were worried about hurting my bike. Besides, posers are lame ;)
 

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short answer, no. the main advantage of DH bikes is the geometry, and that's also the main impediment to pedaling, especially uphill. the weight difference is usually minimal, with FR bikes coming in in the upper 30s to low 40s, and DH bikes are usually low-mid 40s. gearing can also be an issue, but with a 32t or 34t cassette and a 32t single front ring, you can get pretty much any gearing you want out of a full-blown DH bike.

how serious are you about racing? how often will you be racing, and is this something that you think you'll be doing for the next several years? do you live within driving distance of a ski resort (if you live in the northeast you're *screwed*, you can hit a dozen mountains within driving distance and race every weekend if you wanted to and it gets addictive)? full-blown race bikes are a LOT faster than FR bikes on the race course (my opinion, dammit, although I'm sure I'll get flamed for that comment :madmax: ), but it depends on how serious you are about doing well, and how many chances you'll get to use it.

if possible, the best option usually is to have more than one bike. keep your current bike for XC, all-mtn, etc, and have a second bike for full-on DH (or hardcore FR if you don't live close enough to a mtn to utilize it all season).

:cool:
 

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How much do you weigh?

That makes a different in how much strain the bike is getting under you. There is a lady in my town who races on an AS-X with a single crown fork (Breakout+, I think).

Some people enjoy challenges and use burly hardtails like Banshee's Morphine.

Me? I do not race.
 
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