Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Blind biker
Joined
·
301 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a law that caps the amount of light you can have on a bike, I know there is one for cars i think as you aren't suppose to run KC lights on the road. Im planning on running 2 MS with 2 P7-d flashlights.
 

·
Rolling
Joined
·
11,120 Posts
Not sure about that, but there is concern about LED lights that ANSI is talking about safety classifications like lasers have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
MS lights don't have any DOT / SAE approval, as such they would be strictly offroad
classified.
for most parts it's about the reflector, what needs to be pointed downwards,
and has a wide spread, also, if you take a look, the headlights, you can't see the bulb directly, they have a litle cover/reflector, and the LED is bare, as such exeeds the brightness, for oncoming drivers.
most small LED's would be barely tollerable, with the bigger ones, you be asking for trouble, aka ticket, worse, if somebody gets into an accident, big dudoo.
seen one in boston, with a mega light, but had specia reflector, spot and center covered, and properly aimed, so far out of trouble,...
to get an idea, the big bang light, they had to redesign the reflector, and get also street approval,...
http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/bigbang.asp
big bang is from Busch & Müller
looks like 3000 lumen, not sure
do have 2 in the works, one 12W and one 24W , but runs on 14.8V packs,
heatsinks are not small eather, so you'd need to change everything.
 

·
Blind biker
Joined
·
301 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow if that light wasnt so expensive I would buy it right now but thats worth as much as my bike. I have been trying to acheive that beam pattern by modifing my flashlights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,790 Posts
mtb_robs-x said:
MS lights don't have any DOT / SAE approval, as such they would be strictly offroad
classified.
for most parts it's about the reflector, what needs to be pointed downwards,
and has a wide spread, also, if you take a look, the headlights, you can't see the bulb directly, they have a litle cover/reflector, and the LED is bare, as such exeeds the brightness, for oncoming drivers.
most small LED's would be barely tollerable, with the bigger ones, you be asking for trouble, aka ticket, worse, if somebody gets into an accident, big dudoo.
seen one in boston, with a mega light, but had specia reflector, spot and center covered, and properly aimed, so far out of trouble,...
to get an idea, the big bang light, they had to redesign the reflector, and get also street approval,...
http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/bigbang.asp
big bang is from Busch & Müller
looks like 3000 lumen, not sure
do have 2 in the works, one 12W and one 24W , but runs on 14.8V packs,
heatsinks are not small eather, so you'd need to change everything.
Well darn. I guess we all have to stop riding on roads at night since I doubt that any bicycle lights are DOT/SAE approved. Bummer.
 

·
Its got what plants crave
Joined
·
5,933 Posts
On the street it's 55w for low beam and I think 75 for high? Don't think there is a limit on "lumens" but it may vary by state.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top