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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I jut bought a GF Suplerfly 100 frame/fork and am looking for a way to finish the build and keep the weight as low as is reasonably possible. I live and ride in central New England (that means roots and rocks in conditions that vary from wet to dry),

Can anyone recommend a reasonably light tire, front and rear, that will work well and still keep my rotating wheel mass low? I don't want a disposable tire that will shred its sidewall on the first ride.

I plan to run tubeless on Bontrager RXL rims.
 

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the newest Racing Ralphs TL Ready tires are 535gms. They're pretty light but not stupid... unless you are doing a lot of rocky terrain, then I'd say the sidewalls might be vulnerable.
 

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Crossmark rear, Ignitor front. Not crazy light, but not heavy either. Not the greatest sidewalls, but they are 600G tires. If you want beefier sidewalls. You have to pay the penalty. Ikons wiegh a little less, but cost much more.
 

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Superflying on Haven
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Just in between light and stupid light... and what a coincidence I have a Trek Superfly 100. Great combo.

Kenda Karma 1.9 rear - 527 grams
Maxxis Ikon 2.20 front - 517 grams
 

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I wouldn't run any of the tires mentioned so far in rocks because of the thin sidewalls, except for maybe the Ignitor. Not worth the risk imo. Maxxis Ikon EXO, 580g, is the lightest tire I would run in your conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just in between light and stupid light... and what a coincidence I have a Trek Superfly 100. Great combo.

Kenda Karma 1.9 rear - 527 grams
Maxxis Ikon 2.20 front - 517 grams
@Menzo,

Are you running them tubeless?

I have been rider a 26er for over 20 yrs and have almost always run 2.1s, front and rear. Therefore, 1.9 seems a little narrow. What should I expect from such a narrow tire here in New England's technical lterrain?
 
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If you go Maxxis, definitely get the EXO casing. It doesn't add much to the weight, but does give you beefier sidewalls. I'm in NJ and the Ikon EXO and Ignitor EXO are both favorites. Both hook up will on wet rocks and roots. I'd go Ignitors for the winter.
 

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I would have to ask...Do you only plan on riding buff ST, or do you plan on riding the typical NE type trails we commonly see pics of? If it's the later then being able to finish out your ride instead of walking would be a bigger priority to me than a few grams. Also your conditions and the ability to vary so easily and widely from dry to slippery wet would also make me look for a tyre that would deal with that respectfully. For me for what you're describing I'd have to 2nd the Ignitors with the Exception LUST casing - you'll be guarenteed that it'll take a really nastily sharp rocks to slice them and they'll setup tubeless a breeze and the Igtnitor tread does well in a wide variety of trail conditions, actually one of the better all around designs, especially if weight is key.

FYI, I agree with Duke, anything under 600g is light in a 29er tyre for real trail riding.
 

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dcubed, I'm from Rhode Island so I ride the exact conditions you are referring to. Since the leaves are starting to fall on wet rocks and the snow will be flying in a few months, the name of the game is going to be traction (until April or so). It's going to be slick out there for the next 6 months. For these conditions, I think the Maxxis Ignitor (run tubeless) offers a really good weight/traction balance. It all depends on where you ride though. Our terrain varies greatly from gentle pine forests to relentless glacial rock fields. If you ride places in Massachusetts like Harold Parker, Foxboro, Borderland, Fort Rock (NH), Bachelor Street and all the chunk Connecticut has to offer on a daily basis......I wouldn't even touch a tire sub 600g, maybe even 700. I'm a big fan of the 2.25, 2.4 Ardents and the 2.25 Specialized Captain Control for the fall/winter.
 

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Rather than recommending a specific tire, here is a different approach.

For the terrain you described, I recommend any tire that weighs more than 650 or 700 grams.

Every time I have gone below that number for tubeless 29er conversion, it has spelled trouble.

If you go Schwalbe, I know that the Snakeskin versions of their tires convert and hold up pretty well. The regular sidewalls, not so much in the rugged stuff.
 

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trail rat
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I jut bought a GF Suplerfly 100 frame/fork and am looking for a way to finish the build and keep the weight as low as is reasonably possible. I live and ride in central New England (that means roots and rocks in conditions that vary from wet to dry),

Can anyone recommend a reasonably light tire, front and rear, that will work well and still keep my rotating wheel mass low? I don't want a disposable tire that will shred its sidewall on the first ride.

I plan to run tubeless on Bontrager RXL rims.
Everything you want to know and more.
http://forums.mtbr.com/wheels-tires/29er-tire-weight-list-532607.html
 

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~Reformed Mechanic~
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I jut bought a GF Suplerfly 100 frame/fork and am looking for a way to finish the build and keep the weight as low as is reasonably possible. I live and ride in central New England (that means roots and rocks in conditions that vary from wet to dry),

Can anyone recommend a reasonably light tire, front and rear, that will work well and still keep my rotating wheel mass low? I don't want a disposable tire that will shred its sidewall on the first ride.

I plan to run tubeless on Bontrager RXL rims.
I dont think Ikon Exo's would qualify as "stupid light" about 580grams in exo I believe, and Im finding them to be rather durable in a variety of terrain.
 
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