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Lets see some pics of homemade or comercialy avaliable jigs.
 

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Joel: I brazed a solid steel plate to the right chain stay to maximize tire clearance. I hope to be able to use 2.5" tires with 395mm chain stays (adjustable 395-415mm) with a 118mm BB
Maybe not perfect photos but I guess you can tell anyway




Jeremy: You are right, by the CS angle. You basically start with the BB and then adjust everything from there. As I wrote, it's not an easy fixture to set up.

Maybe I will build a better fixture in the future. It's my first frame and I'm learning by my mistakes. I think (and hope) frame #2 will be a lot easier
 

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Syltmunk said:
I use a Newport optical bread board and it works really well, will post some pics soon.
An optical table is a great idea. You can use it for so many other applications as well. What size would be adequate, 24'x36'? Some of the smaller ones are less than 2" thick. Would that thickness flex when loaded up with heavy bike frame fixturing? These tables are only meant for photonics, where the fixtures and components are very light weight.

How do you support the table surface so that you can maintain it's flatness? Do you use the special frame supplied by the manufacturer?

Another option is tooling plate. It is very flat. The only problem is that you have to drill holes into it. The predrilled table is a much more convenient solution.
 

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Bringelli Jig on a stand I built to suit my limited workspace.

-First pic is when stand/jig are deployed, allowing access to a steel workbench with 3' x 4' work area on the backside of the fixture.
-Second pic is stand all "folded" up for rollaway into the corner. It has a footprint of about 3' x 4' in this config. and stores nicely in the corner of my garage.
-Third pic is of the block and tackle used to raise/lower the work table. The winch is 4:1 ratio and pulls 1/8" vinyl coated cable. The table weighs in at about 70lbs. and is very easy to lift with this ratio and is heavy enough to lower itself once the locks are released. The chain driven drum on the far side will eventually be used to deploy the outriggers, which are currently deployed manually.
-Fourth pic illustrates one of 8 positions the Jig can be locked into, in 45* increments, so that any joint can be easily accessed at any time. The jig rotates on the "recycled" rear hub of a 1959 Morris Mini Cooper.

The whole lot was crudely assembled with a bandsaw, a grinder, an Arc welder, a MIG welder, and about $80 in scrap steel. To date, it has helped with 2 frame builds and there will be many more in it's future.
 

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The Matt
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Hardwood Electrical supply Cable Bicycle accessory
I just used this for the first time and as far as I know it worked great. I made it with a long main beam so I can build a longtail like the Surly Big Dummy.

Matt
 

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The Matt
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The main beam is 3X6. It is much much stouter than I had expected. You coud use it to support a house and it would stay true. I think that you could use something smaller with no problem. 3x3 would be more than enough but it would have less surface area to mount accessories. I had no Idea how strong and stiff this stuff was when I ordered it. I was woried about flex so I used what I found in this arctos diagram.
Blue Green Yellow Text White
I think that this jig could be used for some serious production work so for me it is very over built. I did get the main beam used on ebay for cheap. I could come up with a parts list if you need it. When I bought the parts I overestimated and have some extra. The cool thing about this extrusion is once you get some you can find millions of uses.

Matt.

Hardrockcop-If you saw what I did to that car you would think that I was running a chop shop. :thumbsup:
 
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