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Beginner
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am pretty new to this, and when I bought my bike the salesman at the bike shop told me to buy a couple of tubes and keep one of them in my little pouchy doohickey when I went to ride. Needless to say...I didn't pay attention, and today I got a flat. When I was ten miles from home. So, I had to call my dad to come get me. I felt like I was 12 again. I have now learned my lesson and will keep a tube on me at all times. Is this the normal learning process?
 

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Make sure you fix the flat yourself, so you know how when 10 miles out. Many of us carry 2 tubes just in case, as well as a patch kit.

The next steep learn for you, is to fix a broken chain. That one is not easy, but WILL happen to you at some point in your riding career.

Go figure out how to fix a broken chain, then laugh when that time comes.
 

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Beginner
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I did fix it myself with a little help from my roadie friend. Pretty easy. I've got one tube in my pouchie thing and another in my camelbak now. The chain thing....I ride singlespeed so hopefully I won't have to deal with that, or at least that's what I've been told.
 

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Thanks for the reminder, i need to grab some tubes too.

Today was my first time riding my bike on the trails. I had a blast. By the time i get to my car, i noticed i had my lockout on. No suspension travel. I was surprised i didn't break it. I didn't ride hard since it was my first time out.
 

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Terrain Sculptor
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ThunderFist009 said:
I did fix it myself with a little help from my roadie friend. Pretty easy. I've got one tube in my pouchie thing and another in my camelbak now. The chain thing....I ride singlespeed so hopefully I won't have to deal with that, or at least that's what I've been told.
I don't think you learned the lesson. The lesson wasn't "carry a spare tube". The lesson was "be prepared".

Never assume it won't happen to you. Tires go flat, chains break, parts come loose, people fall off their bikes and get cuts and bruises or land on their heads.

Ask around and see if any of these have never happened to people who have been riding for a while.
 

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Being a newbee myself, do you get flats that cannot be fixed with a patch kit? Knock on wood... haven't had a flat in a while.

And something I learned (the hard way)... remember to zip your little pouchie thing back up after repairs. There is a multi purpose tool out on our local trails. Doh!:madman:
 

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Trail Ninja said:
Never assume it won't happen to you. Tires go flat, chains break, parts come loose, people fall off their bikes and get cuts and bruises or land on their heads.

Ask around and see if any of these have never happened to people who have been riding for a while.
All of the above hundreds of times.

OP: On top of the tube stash a glueless patch kit somewhere where you'll forget about it until you really need it. The only thing more frustrating than a second flat is no way to fix it. Make friends with a mechanic. They all tend to be friends in most areas. Start riding with 2 or 3 mechanics and you wont be stuck unless you break a major structural part. DO NOT fall into the trap of thinking more stuff equals prepared. Knowledge, skills, and a willingness (and ability) to improvise with expensive bike parts equal prepared. It's a constant learning/tinkering process like hotrodding or fishing.
 

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Terrain Sculptor
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coopdad said:
Being a newbee myself, do you get flats that cannot be fixed with a patch kit? Knock on wood... haven't had a flat in a while.

And something I learned (the hard way)... remember to zip your little pouchie thing back up after repairs. There is a multi purpose tool out on our local trails. Doh!:madman:
It depends on where you ride. Cut tires are rare in my area but you won't fix that with a patch. P.S. I left a $70 Alien multi tool on the bumper of my truck.

@ThunderFist009, I don't know if your roadie friend mentioned to check the inside of the tire before you put it back on after fixing a flat. There could be a thorn sticking through that will flatten your new tube. Run your fingers around inside the tire to feel for anything sharp.
 

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I carry one extra tube, a multi tool, a $20 bill, a few extra ziplock bags, a kershaw leek folding pocket knife, and a little bottle of CLP gun oil.

Still need a small, quality hand pump.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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I usually reinflate the tube I pull off a little bit, find the hole, and now know where the thorn, staple, etc. is. Both ways work okay, but I sometimes miss a piece of debris if I don't know where to look for it.

Finally broke a chain at the tail end of last season - first time I've done that to a correctly installed chain. So I was glad that I'd put a power link in my seat bag, just in case.
 

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2wheelsoul said:
The next steep learn for you, is to fix a broken chain. That one is not easy, but WILL happen to you at some point in your riding career.

Go figure out how to fix a broken chain, then laugh when that time comes.
I learned this one the hard way, but I can safely say next time I'll be prepared.
 

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Token Hillbilly
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Normal, mang.

I've got a backpack that goes with me to the trailhead that I keep a bottle of tri-flow, several CO2 cartridges, a couple of tires, extra shoe cleats, two water bottles, riding shoes and two pair of riding gloves.

My toolbox, that I keep in the Jeep, has all of the necessary tools and spare parts to fix most any mechanical failures. It also houses my first aid stuffs. Categorize the duct tape as included for both toolbox and first aid.

My saddle bag has a couple of tubes, two CO2 cartridges, a CO2 inflator, Crank Bros multitool, two tire levers, a short length of chain, and a crappy pocket knife.

Sometimes I also have a cooler for the post ride beer.

Broken crap can either ruin a ride, or add to the flavor. Consider preparedness a seasoning. :D
 

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Terrain Sculptor
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ThunderFist009 said:
@Trail Ninja: He did mention to check that. Is something to do with the spokes?
No, inside the tire, not the rim. Something caused the flat, like a thorn or something and it's probably still in the tire. If you put a new tube in and don't find the thing that caused the flat, it's going to flatten the new tube when you pump it up.

When you have the tire off, if you run the tips of your fingers all over the inside of the tire, even if you can't see the thorn, it will catch on your fingerprints and you'll feel it.

You may as well check the rim that way too. If you feel something sharp, it's likely to flatten your tire eventually. You can use part of an old tube as rim tape (that little strip of rubber that covers the ends of the spokes) if yours is broken or worn out or missing any bits.

Improvising has been mentioned as a good skill to have and the 2 best tools to improvise with are duct tape and zip ties.
 
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