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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm building an RFX and thinking of a TALAS 36 up front but need help to decide which one - R or RC2.

I'll be doing a fair amount of climbing so having a fork that doesn't bob too much would be nice (lockout is better but not available on this fork). There's also about a $100 price difference to consider.

So, my question is:
Does the slowest compression setting on the 36RC2 really bob noticeably less than the R when climbing?
 

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I'm not sure if you've ridden a bike like this before, but there are some things you should know (I've had these types of bikes for a long time, and currently have a turner 6-pack (just like the rfx)):

A fork with lockout will not help you climb such a bike. You NEED a travel adjustment (like with the talas) to lower the front end so it doesn't ground-loop on you as you try to climb. This is the real issue.

It's not going to matter if a bike that heavy is bobbing. It's not a light bike, and a little bobbing doesn't really do much, and also realize that if you eliminate the bobbing you decrease the traction significantly, so it could make those climbs even harder. Don't try to adjust the rear and front suspension to "not bob" unless you're riding up on hard roads, otherwise it's not going to help, and the real reason it's tough is because it's heavy, and that's it.

Front-end bobbing is usually NOT an issue with full-suspension bikes, the rear end deals with a lot of that energy, but with a hardtail the only thing that can compress is the fork, and it does so readily due to the weight transfer and forces. Once again, lockout on the front end does not help you climb a bike like this. They don't really "bob" on the front end.

Now, the RC2 may be a good fork from the tunability standpoint, in fact it doesn't have the ability to easily change the progressiveness as you can with other forks, so some riders feel that the talas fork tends to "blow through the travel" more than others, adding some compresion damping can help with that effect, as well as help out with brake dive, although in both of these situations it will ride a little harsher, that's simply the reality of the adjustment.

In any case, the RC2 can help you get a good compramise as far as these factors are concerned, but you really shouldn't be buying it to engage the lockout on climbs, that's simply not the issue with long-travel bikes. You're not going to get front-end bob to any noticable extent, and the real problem is the axle-to-crown height, and on real steep climbs you gotta lower it down so you can keep the front wheel on the ground during those steep climbs.
 

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myitch said:
I'm building an RFX and thinking of a TALAS 36 up front but need help to decide which one - R or RC2.

I'll be doing a fair amount of climbing so having a fork that doesn't bob too much would be nice (lockout is better but not available on this fork). There's also about a $100 price difference to consider.

So, my question is:
Does the slowest compression setting on the 36RC2 really bob noticeably less than the R when climbing?
Yeah, dropping the travel firms up the fork too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jayem said:
I'm not sure if you've ridden a bike like this before, but there are some things you should know (I've had these types of bikes for a long time, and currently have a turner 6-pack (just like the rfx)):

A fork with lockout will not help you climb such a bike. You NEED a travel adjustment (like with the talas) to lower the front end so it doesn't ground-loop on you as you try to climb. This is the real issue.

It's not going to matter if a bike that heavy is bobbing. It's not a light bike, and a little bobbing doesn't really do much, and also realize that if you eliminate the bobbing you decrease the traction significantly, so it could make those climbs even harder. Don't try to adjust the rear and front suspension to "not bob" unless you're riding up on hard roads, otherwise it's not going to help, and the real reason it's tough is because it's heavy, and that's it.

Front-end bobbing is usually NOT an issue with full-suspension bikes, the rear end deals with a lot of that energy, but with a hardtail the only thing that can compress is the fork, and it does so readily due to the weight transfer and forces. Once again, lockout on the front end does not help you climb a bike like this. They don't really "bob" on the front end.

Now, the RC2 may be a good fork from the tunability standpoint, in fact it doesn't have the ability to easily change the progressiveness as you can with other forks, so some riders feel that the talas fork tends to "blow through the travel" more than others, adding some compresion damping can help with that effect, as well as help out with brake dive, although in both of these situations it will ride a little harsher, that's simply the reality of the adjustment.

In any case, the RC2 can help you get a good compramise as far as these factors are concerned, but you really shouldn't be buying it to engage the lockout on climbs, that's simply not the issue with long-travel bikes. You're not going to get front-end bob to any noticable extent, and the real problem is the axle-to-crown height, and on real steep climbs you gotta lower it down so you can keep the front wheel on the ground during those steep climbs.
"noticeable" bob. what is noticeable bob is different for each person. coming from a pike with a lockout, going to a fork w/o lockout (the talas) bob will be noticeable for me. i guess i just have to decide is it worth the extra $100 for compression adjustments. and am i really going to mind adjusting it every time i crest a hill. hmm, not sure about that one. the poplock switch on the bars sure is nice to have. however, there is the u-turn to deal with.

that's one reason i'm going with a talas from the pike or u-turn fork. tired of turning knobs.
 

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myitch said:
"noticeable" bob. what is noticeable bob is different for each person. coming from a pike with a lockout, going to a fork w/o lockout (the talas) bob will be noticeable for me. i guess i just have to decide is it worth the extra $100 for compression adjustments. and am i really going to mind adjusting it every time i crest a hill. hmm, not sure about that one. the poplock switch on the bars sure is nice to have. however, there is the u-turn to deal with.

that's one reason i'm going with a talas from the pike or u-turn fork. tired of turning knobs.
Well good luck with that, but again, on a bike like you're talking about, that "bob" doesn't keep you from climbing or really have any impact on the climbing. It's in your head. You should have far greater concerns about the weight and being able to drop the front end. The bike is going to be heavy enough that you aren't going to care about a slight amount of bob, and eliminating it would not have any noticable positive effect. Ive ridden these bikes with and without forks that lockout. It doesn't help.
 

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fsrxc said:
Yeah, dropping the travel firms up the fork too.
Not at all. The TALAS system is designed to keep a fairly level feel regardless of what suspension travel you're setting the fork at. So drop it down from 160 to any lower setting and it will feel the same, just lower.

What is the problem in this? You're first biasing weight more forward, and in the case of my 06 RFX, the fork does bob way more. It will also bottom out. One can also attach a pump to the air valve and see that through the way the TALAS system works, the air pressure stays relatively constant through the different travel settings.

So again, the fork doesn't feel stiffer. It doesn't work like Zoke's TAS.
 

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I have ridden a talas 36 RC2, and have a Fox 40 RC2 with the same damping adjustments.The RC2 has low and high speed compression adjustments, so you can raise the low speed damping, and give yourself a little more efficient ride, raising the low speed damping also helps keep your bike from quickly diving forward when you hit the brakes. you can keep the high speed compression open, or with low damping to get a nice smooth ride over fast rough trails. you will not loose much traction, if you do loose any from raising your low speed compression, but it will be rougher, especially over braking bumps, and you could loose some traction on those, and other similar terrains.
 

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myitch said:
Does the slowest compression setting on the 36RC2 really bob noticeably less than the R when climbing?
myitch, a few things:
1. The compression on the RC2 is hidden away and at the bottom of the fork. Its not something you would easily maximize for a climb.
2. The max compression would ride pretty awful anyway. The changes there are pretty noticeable.
3. I really agree with Jayem. Especially about the travel adjust being a must for the RFX.
4. I do suggest that you borrow/steal :) a similar bike and get a feel for it. Perhaps one with a Rc2?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
tald said:
myitch, a few things:
1. The compression on the RC2 is hidden away and at the bottom of the fork. Its not something you would easily maximize for a climb.
2. The max compression would ride pretty awful anyway. The changes there are pretty noticeable.
3. I really agree with Jayem. Especially about the travel adjust being a must for the RFX.
4. I do suggest that you borrow/steal :) a similar bike and get a feel for it. Perhaps one with a Rc2?
Thanks, tald.

you sure about that one about the compression knobs being on the bottom? i thought the rebound was on the bottom and the right knob was the compression. i've never seen a fork with the compression bottom side. if it is on the bottom, well thats useless than during a ride.

no matter anyhow. i pulled the trigger on a 36R since i'm really a set 'n forget rider. the less knobs to adjust while riding the better. i figured the bobbing won't be less really while climbing, just slower. then like you said, it'd have to open it again after cresting the hill or i'll have a harsh ride going downhill on those small stutter bumps or braking bumps. that would mean more turning of knobs....again. which is what i'm tired of doing.

as for weight of the bike. i'm figuring it'll weigh about what my current x5/6 does now...about 33# give or take. not a fast climbing bike but minimal bob with the poplock locked on my pike and compression closed on my vanilla rc.
 

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myitch said:
Thanks, tald.

you sure about that one about the compression knobs being on the bottom? i thought the rebound was on the bottom and the right knob was the compression. i've never seen a fork with the compression bottom side. if it is on the bottom, well thats useless than during a ride.
My 66 with RC2 (same name but nothing to do with the fox fork) has the compression knob on the bottom, it's set-and-forget like you say. The rebound and ETA lever are on top, and the ETA lever is the thing that gets used during the steep climbs.
 

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Jerk_Chicken said:
Not at all. The TALAS system is designed to keep a fairly level feel regardless of what suspension travel you're setting the fork at. So drop it down from 160 to any lower setting and it will feel the same, just lower.

What is the problem in this? You're first biasing weight more forward, and in the case of my 06 RFX, the fork does bob way more. It will also bottom out. One can also attach a pump to the air valve and see that through the way the TALAS system works, the air pressure stays relatively constant through the different travel settings.

So again, the fork doesn't feel stiffer. It doesn't work like Zoke's TAS.
Oops, I was speaking from experience with other forks, and wrongly assumed the Talas was the same. Even my Minute 3 with IT seems firmer when it's dropped (and I've devolved it so it's not the SPV effect).
 
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