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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Anyone here ever done this monster? Well I'm training for the little bro, the (Silver Rush 50 miler) and had a few questions because its 8000K of vertical hell, gaining most of it over 10,000 feet of elevation and its twice that I have ever rode in a day.

I would say I'm a nutrition nut but don't really know how to prepare for climbing 8 hours in the saddle. :thumbsup:
 

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Some friends and I are doing the 50 as well. Don't know how well it will work, but we've just been riding 3 to 4 days a week with a big climb ride at least once a week. The last climb was Hermit Road in the Sangres on Friday. Hopefully that will have us somewhat ready for the beatdown at the LT50.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not familiar with the rides down there, but I just did the Argentine Pass ride this weekend and plan on doing the Wheeler trail over Peak 8/9 from Breck into Copper on Thursday. It might be too early for this one because of snow!!!

Anyone with any suggestions of a few long, high altitude rides within at least within a couple of hours drive from Denver thats not holding any snow?? Prefer a good mix of single track!
 

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Elbert, south trail. out and back. You might be good to go without snow.

3 of my neighbors have done the Leadville 100. One thing they did was to see what they needed to do (food and pace wise) on Chimney gulch. I think one of them did it 4 times up and down, with the goal of 5. They learned the food think pretty quickly. one of them ran 100 oz of Accelerade with powder to make more. Along with packs of goo and apple slices.

Bergen Peak would be good training. Although not as high, its close and it does top out at 9000+ something.

The other trick one of my neighbors did was stay in Leadville 5 days prior to the race. Besides being in good shape and eating right, the largest and remaining variable is purely being at that altitude.... unless you dope.
 

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rubber side down
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The LT100 is largely not very technical. If I had it all over to do again, I'd spend lots more time on my road bike. If you don't have one, just go do laps of Centennial Cone, or something. You could also head up to Breckenridge, get some high altitude training in, and ride the Firecracker 50 course.

R
 

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Ride as often as possible and include plenty of good climbs. You'll be in shape but the most important thing during the race is to keep fueled and hydrated - it sucks to bonk at mile 85. :sad: I try to drink regularly - at least a bottle an hour. One bottle I have is plain water, the other is Accelerade. I eat Clif bars and Gu and a peanut butter and honey sandwich. For the Gu, I load up a flask and suck on that regularly. Banana bread is good too as is a potato. Put yourself on an eating and drinking schedule for the race and try to stick with it. What saved me the year I bonked was salt tablets. The endurance forum has plenty of tips too.
 

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I ran a pretty heavy mix of accelerade in my camelback for the firecracker and pounded some water at every aid station to clean my mouth out because it felt sticky. I rode consistently and never got the cramps in my legs that I had gotten before on other races.

As for training, I liked riding the colorado trail through summit county. Plenty of elevation, climbing and lots of time to just spin.
 

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my $0.02

i've ridden Leadville, the former Vail Ultra 100, and done 24-hour races solo, 2-man and four-man. my $0.02:

- whatever food you find works in training - stick to it. put it in your drop bags and use it. i like real food, but the energy stuff is getting better and better. wheat thins are good and salty.
- if you've got a watch with a countdown-repeat timer, set if for say 15- or 20-minute intervals and use that to get out of the saddle, stretch, hydrate, etc. it really helps over the course of the ride. having the timer remind you gives your mind one less thing to think about.
- don't get caught up in the initial sprint. these guys are crazy. stick to your plan. you'll catch the bozos that get caught up in the initial adrenaline rush and start out too fast.
- put some chain lube in your drop bags. having chain suck, sucks...
- don't at all get discouraged when the leaders pass you coming the other way. you'll think they must have cheated, but they didn't. they're just freaks.
- have fun and don't put too much pressure on yourself. you're paying to do this, not getting paid to do this (i presume anyway...) though gold is nice, there's no shame in getting the silver buckle.

:thumbsup:
 

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enduroslrider said:
- don't at all get discouraged when the leaders pass you coming the other way. you'll think they must have cheated, but they didn't. they're just freaks.
The leaders will be Levi and Lance who will be blowing the doors off the whole race, so DON"T pay attention to them.
 

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Well, your post sure is confusing. Are you racing the Silver Rush 50? The LT100? Both?

You title the thread LT100, you say you're training for the SR50, you say 8 hours (very slow SR or very fast LT) and then you put up a picture of the LT100.

Ok, having ridden the SR50 and the LT100 I can give some suggestions.

LT100 - A lot of road training, get used to a long steady effort, which is also a great way to sort out nutrition. Take a ride up Mount Evans from Idaho Springs, who cares if you don't have a road bike, use the MTB.

SR50 - Definitely more technical than the LT100. Practice some technical descents and be ready to bust out a hike-a-bike. The Firecracker 50 from the French Creek climb on is a good simulator of tough technical climbing (though it isn't quite steep enough to drive you to a hike-a-bike) and then there is a pretty technical downhill thrown in there too.

There are plenty of mining roads up in Leadville that are now clear of snow, go up there and do some rides, check out the course as much as you can. Last year at this time there was only one 20 foot snowfield left on the SR 50 course at the high point.
 

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enduroslrider said:
i've ridden Leadville, the former Vail Ultra 100, and done 24-hour races solo, 2-man and four-man. my $0.02:

- whatever food you find works in training - stick to it. put it in your drop bags and use it. i like real food, but the energy stuff is getting better and better. wheat thins are good and salty.
- if you've got a watch with a countdown-repeat timer, set if for say 15- or 20-minute intervals and use that to get out of the saddle, stretch, hydrate, etc. it really helps over the course of the ride. having the timer remind you gives your mind one less thing to think about.
- don't get caught up in the initial sprint. these guys are crazy. stick to your plan. you'll catch the bozos that get caught up in the initial adrenaline rush and start out too fast.
- put some chain lube in your drop bags. having chain suck, sucks...
- don't at all get discouraged when the leaders pass you coming the other way. you'll think they must have cheated, but they didn't. they're just freaks.
- have fun and don't put too much pressure on yourself. you're paying to do this, not getting paid to do this (i presume anyway...) though gold is nice, there's no shame in getting the silver buckle.

:thumbsup:
I'll say +1 on everything that enduroslrider said. I've only done the 100 once. I hear that the 50 is "mile for mile, a harder race).

LT100 (or any other LONG race) is as much mental as it is physical. You need to remind yourself to eat and drink, you will forget and if you do, you will bonk. Timers are great reminders. You will go through highs and lows. Figure out how to work through the lows (mentally).

As far as training goes - just get out and ride. If you have to do laps :eek: on White Ranch or any other front range trails, or even road rides, DO IT. And practice eating on the long rides. If you finish a 5-7 hour ride and you are STARVING, you are not getting the right nourishment.

That's my .02 cents. My wife and I will be there this year (on the big green bike). Good luck and have some fun!!!! :thumbsup:
 

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50 vs. 100

The Silver Rush *is* mile-for-mile more difficult than the LT100. A lot of people do both races, so you can look at their Silver Rush time and their LT100 time a few weeks later. The Silver Rush always takes more than half the amount of time as the LT100.

More technical and more jarring. Bring your FS rig.
 

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Silver Rush 50

I rode parts of the Silver Rush course about a week and a half ago, most of which was clear of snow, except for some of the area around Ball Mountain. I imagine it is good to go by now.

Pre-ride the course so you know where you can push it and where you need to just keep the pedals turning. Also, unless you can spin up about anything, get your mind ready for a few sustained hike-a-bike sections, and wear your most comfortable shoes.
 

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holding back the darkness
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I know the OP said they were doing the 50 miler, but here's what I know about the whole enchilada..... I hope some gems can be mined.

I have sung the praises of the deli sammich as the ultimate ride-food in the past.
Racing is different from riding.
I have done the LT100 twice.
I went for no solid foods and a constant input of simple sugars. GU/Gel and some sort of liquid sugar drink at about 15 min intervals (GU on the hour, squirt of sugardrink on the quarter-hour, GU on the half-hour). The biggest problem I encountered was electrolyte loss. Using a basic model of sodium loss for the average person, I found that I would have to eat a super-sodium PowerGel every 10-15 minutes to remain sodium neutral. Yikes!
I combated this by downing a can of regular sodium tomato soup for breakfast and I stashed one at my Columbine drop bag.
Do not hang out at the top of any major climbs. In the 100 lots of folks just sort of hang out at the top of Columbine, chillin' , eating boiled potatoes, sorting through their drop bags. This is a stupid practice. At that elevation it is very difficult to recover. You'll cavitate your lungs and burn your blood hanging out. Get to the top and turn around immediately. Recover on the way down.
 

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IndecentExposure said:
Elbert, south trail. out and back. You might be good to go without snow.

3 of my neighbors have done the Leadville 100. One thing they did was to see what they needed to do (food and pace wise) on Chimney gulch. I think one of them did it 4 times up and down, with the goal of 5. They learned the food think pretty quickly. one of them ran 100 oz of Accelerade with powder to make more. Along with packs of goo and apple slices.

Bergen Peak would be good training. Although not as high, its close and it does top out at 9000+ something.

The other trick one of my neighbors did was stay in Leadville 5 days prior to the race. Besides being in good shape and eating right, the largest and remaining variable is purely being at that altitude.... unless you dope.
I was playing on youtube yesterday and I think i saw your video on elbert. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Thanks for all of your reply's

Wow, all of the feedback was a nice surprise. To put to rest any confusion, I am doing the SR 50. I felt that more people would be familiar with the Leadville 100 so I posted hoping to get information from present and past participants and thanks for all of the info. It is definatey helping me to prepare.

I will be riding my stumpy and also wondered what tires I should use? My beefy knobs or something that rolls better. I am running 2.4 dual compound on front and 2.1 on rear currently. I do have a few smaller "less aggressive" for the rear but I'm hearing that there is a lot of steep areas that may require the knobs.

Love your opinions on whether to carry a backpack or seatpost mounted saddle bag for supplies? I've done both on longer trips but have never done anything this long before and am afraid the backpack may become too cumbersome and hot. The Seatpost bag puts a lot of weight back and makes it tough to keep the front wheel down on steep climbs. :madman:

I live at 6300' so I just booked a cabin in the Camp Hale area a couple days prior to the event and I think its 9100' (Should help some eh?)
 

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CR-MtnBiker said:
I will be riding my stumpy and also wondered what tires I should use?
Something skinny and efficient. I rode continental explorers both years and they did fine. Their mountain king might be a good choice. I don't know what the terrain will be like for your race, but the 100 was mostly doubletrack with 1 sketchy descent/climb. Not worth dragging the big lugs around for the rest of the race. Go with something 2.1ish. CrossMarks might also work well.
Wear the backpack. Weather changes fast and you'll need some sort of raingear JIC, and everything else you need to be somewhat self-supported in the backcountry. On a race of this distance a minor mechanical like a flat tire or broken chain might not just ruin your race, but could leave you out in the cold, wet for an extended period. Plus having enough water with you is not only important for health, but can save you time. Just because there is an aid station doesn't mean you have to waste a whole bunch of time stopping for it, and if you've got enough water you won't have to. Plus that free up your water bottles to hold something with electrolytes in addition to your plain water. You definitely don't want to only have the option of syrupy sweetness while you're out there. There may come a point where your sweet sports drinks become unpalatable and you just really want some cool clean refreshing water.
Something minimal, light. If you've been training with one then you shouldn't have any problems with comfort come race day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Could someone tell me where to access the Firecracker 50 trailhead and would you have a link to any more info like a map and vertical feet traveled etc... I am doing a high altitude training ride in the morning and just called the Dillon Ranger district and they said my ride I was planning still held a lot of snow on top of peak 8/9 as of last thursday. I was planning the Miners trail to Wheeler and up and over and down into Copper. They assumed that Wise Mountain/Co Trail off of tiger rd was snowed up as well! Anyone know any different?

Thanx
 
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