Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When a LBS trues wheels, should they be just about perfectly straight? I think I've now been to two LBSs that do half-azz jobs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
there is a point where you cant get a wheel back to what you would consider "just about perfectly staight". it could also be a crap mechanic. your call
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,906 Posts
Especially with disc brake wheels, there are two camps: perfectly true, or perfectly tensioned. I personally fall into the first camp, and haven't had a rim that is (mostly) true fail yet. Talk to the people who actually work on your wheel--if they don't have a good reason for not making the wheel perfectly round, then, yeah, they're lazy.
 

·
Picture Unrelated
Joined
·
5,123 Posts
There comes a point where a wheel can not be returned to "perfectly" true or perfectly round without causing a major imbalance in tension. Maybe your wheel is suffering from this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the input. the rims were just a little out of true and when i picked it up,the rear one was good but the front one looked like it wasn't even looked at. he might have just done a poor job. the rims are less than a year old on my el mariachi (stan's arch) so wouldn't think they wouldn't be able to be perfectly trued.
 

·
Old Punk
Joined
·
530 Posts
This is one of those mechanical skills that every bike enthusiast should learn, as there is no lbs 20mi into the ride. Once you realize how simple of a task it is, you will never waist your $ on a true job.

Just search wheel truing instruction and pick one of the many sights that explain step by step. Most also have step by step instruction on building wheels as well as a huge array of bike maintenance and build instruction. This is my favorite Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information. Long live this sight, r.i.p. Sheldon.

It's the old adage "If you want it done right, do it yourself".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
This is one of those mechanical skills that every bike enthusiast should learn, as there is no lbs 20mi into the ride. Once you realize how simple of a task it is, you will never waist your $ on a true job.

Just search wheel truing instruction and pick one of the many sights that explain step by step. Most also have step by step instruction on building wheels as well as a huge array of bike maintenance and build instruction. This is my favorite Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information. Long live this sight, r.i.p. Sheldon.

It's the old adage "If you want it done right, do it yourself".
I wholeheartedly agree. A bike mechanic at the local shop might be able to spend 10 minutes truing a wheel, if that much, due to other duties/bikes/customers calling for his/her attention. I, on the other hand, can spend much more time (essentially limited only by my need for sleep) truing wheels and balancing the tension in the spokes; I can take the additional time to make sure that the spokes are not winding up, to relieve twist-torque on the spokes, and to generally give my wheels much more TLC than a store mechanic ever could. The same also applies to any repair and maintenance on my bikes...my attention is only on my bike without needing to worry about the other responsibilities in a bike shop.
 

·
T.W.O
Joined
·
1,730 Posts
There comes a point where a wheel can not be returned to "perfectly" true or perfectly round without causing a major imbalance in tension. Maybe your wheel is suffering from this.
This. Especially if you're only being charged for a true, not a total reworking which is an undertaking. Hell, half the time they don't come perfectly true from a manufacture.
 

·
Probably drunk right now
Joined
·
6,753 Posts
Age doesn't matter

thanks for the input. the rims were just a little out of true and when i picked it up,the rear one was good but the front one looked like it wasn't even looked at. he might have just done a poor job. the rims are less than a year old on my el mariachi (stan's arch) so wouldn't think they wouldn't be able to be perfectly trued.
The age of a rim doesn't matter. What matters is whether they've been tweaked too much and won't hold tension or stay true. I have a set of wheels that I've been riding for 7 years that are as true as the day I received them. They've ever seen a spoke wrench.

I have other sets of wheels that I screwed up and they couldn't be trued or wouldn't stay true.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is one of those mechanical skills that every bike enthusiast should learn, as there is no lbs 20mi into the ride. Once you realize how simple of a task it is, you will never waist your $ on a true job.

Just search wheel truing instruction and pick one of the many sights that explain step by step. Most also have step by step instruction on building wheels as well as a huge array of bike maintenance and build instruction. This is my favorite Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information. Long live this sight, r.i.p. Sheldon.

It's the old adage "If you want it done right, do it yourself".
i totally agree. i feel i'm a pretty handy guy but for whatever reason some bike maintenance just intimidates me. i know i have to learn it- the few times i needed work on my bike, it never came out as i wanted it. the latest was a brake bleed because my pistons were stuck- now the rear brake is soft and needs another bleed. i'm sick of going to shops that do half-azz work.

this help motivates me. thank you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,980 Posts
Definitely.
Spray some lube on the nipples and put a wrench/key to it. Keep in mind to spread out the tension to keep it even, and make small adjustments a little bit at a time spread out around each bent area.
You'll get it. Easy peeze and cool.
 

·
R.I.P. DogFriend
Joined
·
6,889 Posts
There comes a point where a wheel can not be returned to "perfectly" true or perfectly round without causing a major imbalance in tension. Maybe your wheel is suffering from this.
True. You never know by just looking at a wheel, but sometimes you end up chasing 'true' at the expense of uniform tension. Every once in a while you have to sacrifice a little bit of 'true' to keep tension in check.

Sometimes you get a wheel that just isn't going to cooperate for any number of reasons. The rim can be twisted or bent in ways you can't necessarily see. A spoke, or spokes, could be damaged or of poor quality, nipples could be suspect too.

If you want it perfectly true and perfectly tensioned, you can't give someone a sow's ear and expect them to return a silk purse. That said, they should communicate to you, the reasons why your wheel isn't 'wonderful' and then let you make a decision on how to move forward.

This is one of those mechanical skills that every bike enthusiast should learn, as there is no lbs 20mi into the ride. Once you realize how simple of a task it is, you will never waist your $ on a true job.

Just search wheel truing instruction and pick one of the many sights that explain step by step. Most also have step by step instruction on building wheels as well as a huge array of bike maintenance and build instruction. This is my favorite Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information. Long live this sight, r.i.p. Sheldon.

It's the old adage "If you want it done right, do it yourself".
Agreed. It's not terribly difficult, but you do need some discipline and concentration. There is some art to it, but mostly the discipline and concentration.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top