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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went to local shop guy that has worked there for 8 years but doesnt ride said I should get a specialized rockhopper hardtail it was 745 and I have seen all these deals on the net with better components or at least forks and brakes it had a Dart 2 fork and disc brakes Iam wanting to get a good bike for 700-900 Hardtail is what I am getting I am really leaning toward a 29er on bikesdirect for Windsor cliff 29er pro any suggestions?
 

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I am a pathetic rider...
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what he said, seriously, I can't tell what you are talking about. And we need more info. Type of riding you are going to be doing? body weight? height? Any previous riding experience? The rockhopper is a solid bike, albeit a little over priced. from the way you were talking though I think you will need all the help you can get in an LBS, so buy something from them, not online.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I apologize for the poor grammer and lack of punctuation! I do alot of texting so my writing is jumbled and not complete most of the time. What I was trying to say is that I am really trying to find a decent bike at a good price with decent components. I went to my LBS and spoke the their salesman and he tried to get me to purchase a 19" rockhopper specialized. I am overweight and new to MBR but I truly enjoy it and I am hooked. I am mechanically inclined but not gramitically so I can handle the upkeep of a bike I believe. So should I by this bike although a little over priced or go with the 29er I located on bikesdirect any help would be appreciated Thanks gentleman cheers.....
 

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To summarize, I believe you want to compare a Rockhopper Comp Disc with a Windsor Cliff 29er Pro.

Without doing a complete part-by-part analysis, I will say the Windsor will probably have better parts with the sole exception of the frame, which is an assumption on my part since I am biased towards Specialized.

Ok, now that you know the parts are better on the Windsor, let me ask you this question:

How can you tell the correct length of the rear derailleur cable housing?

Now this seems like a very simple question, but if you can't answer it, your shifting will not be professional standard. BTW, the answer is the housing should extend from the rear derailleur about an inch before bending.

You see, there are probably 50 details exactly like that one which shops will handle. Some of them is quite easy to figure out, some of them if you screw up, you destroy your bike (like "how to adjust the low-limit derailleur stop" or "does my bottom bracket shell needs to be tapped").

Bikes Direct recommends you bring your bike to a professional shop, which adds another $60-80 to the cost of the bike. After you ride your bike a month, you will need to bring it back to the shop for minor adjustments, another $60-80, then every 6 months after that.

When buying a bike from a dealer, you have more of a guarantee of a perfect assembled and adjusted bike, and you get the advice and friendship of the staff there.

When you buy a bike online, all you get is a bike and a deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for your reply. I think your right I dont have a clue maybe I will look for a shop that will make me feel a little more comfortable dealing with them. Does anyone know of a good shop around Austin Tx?
 

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sanjuro said:
Bikes Direct recommends you bring your bike to a professional shop, which adds another $60-80 to the cost of the bike. After you ride your bike a month, you will need to bring it back to the shop for minor adjustments, another $60-80, then every 6 months after that.

When buying a bike from a dealer, you have more of a guarantee of a perfect assembled and adjusted bike, and you get the advice and friendship of the staff there.

When you buy a bike online, all you get is a bike and a deal.
I know...I'm beating a dead horse here, but...

Why is that when buying bikes online, folks come out of the wood-work adding all these phantom costs of ownership? Your scenario presents a conservative cost of about $240 all the way to $320 for the first year(ish) and $120 to $160 / year after that to keep a bike in riding tune? I built an online bike from frame up and my bike works great, and I don't find myself needing to tinker with it over and over.

He said he was mechanically inclined...and it's *not* the space shuttle. All of those "details" are exactly what this board is for. Besides, would it not be possible to buy a service contract from an LBS and develop a relationship with them through parts and service? Of course it is.

My highly recommended LBS in OKC (I bought a GF Big Sur from them) just could not tune a bike to my liking. Why? Because I was just one more bike that they needed to tune...no special friendship or consideration...business is business. When I decided that I was going to start tuning the bike myself for my specific desire, I hit the internet and learned a ton, bought a basic bike-specific tool kit and had at it. I can tune my bikes exactly how I like, test ride and fine-tune if needed.

Sorry, I guess I just don't totally buy into the panacea of the LBS especially if your intent is to do your own work anyway.

To the OP: IMHO spend your money where you perceive the most value can be had...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks everyone for your replies I am still on the fence. Myself only having limited resources to spend 700-900 on a bike I still want to get the best bike for the money Internet seems to have it without the "middle man". Still I am just a new fish in this pond just trying to get the tools to eat with.
 

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Compare the Windsor to the Fuji Tahoe 29er Pro because they are 95% the same bike. In fact, the Windsor even comes with its parts kit in a Fuji box. The only difference is the Windsor frame does not have the "power diamond" downtube. Its not a low-end frame, its actually quite well built and reasonable weight.

Take some of that money you save and buy a bicycle tool set and a good manual (I recommend Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance) and you should have no problem if your reasonably mechanically inclined.
 

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It all depends on your lbs. If they're good guys it would be worth buying the bike from them just to establish a relationship. If you don't get a good feeling then I would do business at another shop if possible or buy it online. You can usually tell the difference in the shops by asking a few questions and comparing their responses. Some shops actually ride and enjoy their customers and the others view it as a business at all times. By this I mean you won't get shop discounts on parts you buy after you've done business with them for 2 years, know you by name, and you've spent a fortune with them. After a few bad experiences with my shop I now only consult them when I absolutely need to. If you can find a good shop it's well worth it though.
 

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Konish said:
I know...I'm beating a dead horse here, but...

Why is that when buying bikes online, folks come out of the wood-work adding all these phantom costs of ownership? Your scenario presents a conservative cost of about $240 all the way to $320 for the first year(ish) and $120 to $160 / year after that to keep a bike in riding tune? I built an online bike from frame up and my bike works great, and I don't find myself needing to tinker with it over and over.

He said he was mechanically inclined...and it's *not* the space shuttle. All of those "details" are exactly what this board is for. Besides, would it not be possible to buy a service contract from an LBS and develop a relationship with them through parts and service? Of course it is.

My highly recommended LBS in OKC (I bought a GF Big Sur from them) just could not tune a bike to my liking. Why? Because I was just one more bike that they needed to tune...no special friendship or consideration...business is business. When I decided that I was going to start tuning the bike myself for my specific desire, I hit the internet and learned a ton, bought a basic bike-specific tool kit and had at it. I can tune my bikes exactly how I like, test ride and fine-tune if needed.

Sorry, I guess I just don't totally buy into the panacea of the LBS especially if your intent is to do your own work anyway.

To the OP: IMHO spend your money where you perceive the most value can be had...
Frankly, this does not apply to every one. A lot of people service their own bikes without assistance of a bike shop.

However, your opinion, while valid, is simply your own. My opinion is the hundreds of bikes I have sold and serviced. And I will say majority of them go well. But I focus on the ones that needed more than just a little aftermarket service.

If this person is has decent mechanical skills and can invest some time in looking over repair manuals, he should be able to take care of most of the problems. But I have seen issues which had to be handled by a professional, which a Specialized dealer would be glad to take of but I doubt Bikes Direct will do.
 

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sanjuro said:
Frankly, this does not apply to every one. A lot of people service their own bikes without assistance of a bike shop.

However, your opinion, while valid, is simply your own. My opinion is the hundreds of bikes I have sold and serviced. And I will say majority of them go well. But I focus on the ones that needed more than just a little aftermarket service.

If this person is has decent mechanical skills and can invest some time in looking over repair manuals, he should be able to take care of most of the problems. But I have seen issues which had to be handled by a professional, which a Specialized dealer would be glad to take of but I doubt Bikes Direct will do.
I'm sorry, but I'm not following you...exactly *what* does not apply to everyone?

Umm, I don't think I stated anything other than it was my opinion. So yes, it is clearly my opinion. I don't see how your opinion of BD is any more valid since it seems as though you haven't actually had to deal with them and yet you assume the worst.

Also, you present a common argument based solely on your *personal* experience selling and building bikes (which I'm guessing that the majority of which are the brands your store carries). Your anecdotal experience while real, is simply that, anecdotal.

I have not purchased a bike through BD, so I'm no "fanboy", but I have purchased from another online retailer and was happy with the transaction...as are many others.

Again, I'm not here to argue one way or the other, but it always just seems like the LBS fans pull the 'ol scare tactic "boy-good-luck-with-that-heap-that'll-end-up-costing-you-MUCH-more-than-if-you-just-bought-from-an-LBS-because-everyone-just-knows-that-online-bike-retailers-suck" routine.

Again, I say assign value to what is most important to the buyer and move in that direction, and accept the ups and downs that come along with either decision.
 

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Stewmander said:
I borrowed this maintenance and repair book from my local library and found it very detailed and easy to follow. It would be a good resource for a beginner (like myself). If you decide to do some of your own work, check out your library or buy this book (its only $15).
There's better, try Zinn's Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance if you're going to buy one IMHO; parktool.com on line is quite good as well. Just curious, do you return it to the library with greasy fingerprints after working on your bike? :D
 

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Mr. DiCenso said:
use sentences!
Not everyones first language is english. The sooner you learn that, the better you'll be in the world.
 

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local trails rider
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When you buy a bike online, it probably comes assembled so that you do not need any of the expensive tools to put it together: especially BB/cranks and headset/fork installed.

On the other hand...
The Rockhopper is a decent bike and it is upgradable: you can replace parts when you break them, or find that they are not good enough.

Buying from a LBS has advantages: you can make sure the bike fits and handles, before you spend your money. Fit and handling are the important things in a bike, followed by durability and reliability.

Test ride every single suitable bike you can find locally ...and a few that are above your price range too, for reference.
 
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