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Hello new member here
what is the process to lace a set of spokes and make them properly tensioned and true?
Is this something that anyone can do or is there special tools needed?
 

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1. Buy a book (my choice), get one from a library or go on the Internet- Jobst Brandt's book is excellent but might be too much info. I also like Zinn's general books.
2. buy all the parts you need
3. buy beer
4. find some time away from wife and kids
5. lay out all your parts
6. open a beer and enjoy a sip
7. open the book and read the wheel building chapter two times
8. start lacing (don't forget to enjoy the beer from time to time)
9. finish lacing
10. enjoy the rest of the beer

I always take a break between lacing and tensioning but that's a personal decision. Remember, it's not rocket science. As for special tools...no, you don't need them but they do help speed things up. I use boiled linseed oil instead of spoke prep and I have used a screwdriver for the nipples but since getting a nipple driver will never go back.

J
 

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As above, read up about it.

Best done with an old wheel in your hands, strip it and rebuild it a few times. You'll probably need some spare nipples.

Get a good quality spoke tool - they're cheap.

Save the beer for when you've finished. :)
 

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is it a one beer process?
Depends how fast you work and drink. I'm good for a beer per wheel :D

I forgot to add that counting the turns on each nipple will get it very close to round and true without a huge hassle later on- that's why the nipple driver is a good idea. When truing and tensioning I save the beer until I'm done.
 

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Lacing a wheel and truing a wheel are two different animals. If this first wheel your building is a fat bike wheel I would recommend having someone else get the calculations/spoke lengths for you, these are not just a standard calc. Things that need to be taken into account: rim offset, spoke hole offset from center line of rim, and single wall rims need the lengths to be spot on. Too short and you can collapse the shoulder of the nipple too long and you are popping your tube on the excess spoke. Fat bike wheel building is not something that I would hand to a beginner. the other thing I would not do is send some one off with a set of spokes,nipples, rim, and hub and expect to visit them the next day with a properly laced, tensioned, and dished wheel.
 

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I laced mine, got them till there was a little tension starting and then paid the local shop $30-40ish to finish/true the pair. The problem is the offset wheel, it's really tough to get it right without a wheel stand and the spacer. Even though it would have been my third set of wheels built, I still wasn't going to chance it due to the odd nature of fatbike wheels.
 

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Lacing a wheel and truing a wheel are two different animals. If this first wheel your building is a fat bike wheel I would recommend having someone else get the calculations/spoke lengths for you, these are not just a standard calc. Things that need to be taken into account: rim offset, spoke hole offset from center line of rim, and single wall rims need the lengths to be spot on. Too short and you can collapse the shoulder of the nipple too long and you are popping your tube on the excess spoke. Fat bike wheel building is not something that I would hand to a beginner. the other thing I would not do is send some one off with a set of spokes,nipples, rim, and hub and expect to visit them the next day with a properly laced, tensioned, and dished wheel.
Agree - lacing is the easy part :)

Also second the motion to not have a pair of fat bike wheels be your first. I built a pair of more standard 26" wheels for another bike first, then the wheels for my fattie second (including offset rear on Rohloff).

It is possible to get past the expense of wheelbuilding kit (stand, dishing tool, tensionometer etc) - have a look here too (google wheelpro or Roger Mussen). I basically followed his line without too many problems.

Beers help (in moderation, of course;)) I'm happy keeping lacing and truing/destressing separate, but once I've gone beyond lacing, I try to finish the wheel in one hit.

It is possible to manage an offset wheel without a spacer - see here (bicycle nomad>bicycles>fat bike build).

I'm sure this and the wheel building forum would happily check your spoke calculations if you post them up - I'd suggest you use Freespoke (google Freespoke if you've not already found it).

Have fun - it's great to ride your own wheels :D

Tom

(as soon as I get another post I'll add the proper links....)
 

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Agree - lacing is the easy part :)

Also second the motion to not have a pair of fat bike wheels be your first. I built a pair of more standard 26" wheels for another bike first, then the wheels for my fattie second (including offset rear on Rohloff).

It is possible to get past the expense of wheelbuilding kit (stand, dishing tool, tensionometer etc) - have a look here too (google wheelpro or Roger Mussen). I basically followed his line without too many problems.

Beers help (in moderation, of course;)) I'm happy keeping lacing and truing/destressing separate, but once I've gone beyond lacing, I try to finish the wheel in one hit.

It is possible to manage an offset wheel without a spacer - see here (bicycle nomad>bicycles>fat bike build).

I'm sure this and the wheel building forum would happily check your spoke calculations if you post them up - I'd suggest you use Freespoke (google Freespoke if you've not already found it).

Have fun - it's great to ride your own wheels :D

Tom

(as soon as I get another post I'll add the proper links....)
RIght!

The links are (in order):

Wheelbuilding book for wheel building
Fat bike build « bicyclenomad
Freespoke

Enjoy
 

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I laced mine, got them till there was a little tension starting and then paid the local shop $30-40ish to finish/true the pair. The problem is the offset wheel, it's really tough to get it right without a wheel stand and the spacer. Even though it would have been my third set of wheels built, I still wasn't going to chance it due to the odd nature of fatbike wheels.
Man My LBS only charges $30 to build a wheel from scratch.
 
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I built my first 2 wheels yesterday, they were both fat bike wheels, wasn't terribly hard, of course my buddy from the LBS guided me for the first one and I was able to do the second one myself. I'm proud of myself! :thumbsup:
xcellent job and rep worthy. :)
 

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Good job tracerprix. I built my first fat front this weekend using Roger Musson's book. No beer though, wanted to be as clear headed as possible. I just posted pictures of my crude nipple driver in the 47mm rim stability post. It helped tremendously. Getting even tension before tightening things down helped keep everything straight. I tried to eyeball it, but no dice. The tool made all the difference.
 

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I built my first 2 wheels yesterday, they were both fat bike wheels, wasn't terribly hard, of course my buddy from the LBS guided me for the first one and I was able to do the second one myself. I'm proud of myself! :thumbsup:
Great job, you are lucky to have a budy who could help you. I stopped into a lbs the other day and they told me they wouldn't touch a wheel (for tensioning/trueing) if they didn't build it from the start. He said they only charge 40 to build it up though. I'm toying with the idea of doing it anyway.
 

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Good job tracerprix. I built my first fat front this weekend using Roger Musson's book. No beer though, wanted to be as clear headed as possible. I just posted pictures of my crude nipple driver in the 47mm rim stability post. It helped tremendously. Getting even tension before tightening things down helped keep everything straight. I tried to eyeball it, but no dice. The tool made all the difference.
The nipple driver looks pretty close to the real thing, I ended up using just a screw driver. That tool would have been easier, the shop had one but I was already pushing my luck!
 

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Great job, you are lucky to have a budy who could help you. I stopped into a lbs the other day and they told me they wouldn't touch a wheel (for tensioning/trueing) if they didn't build it from the start. He said they only charge 40 to build it up though. I'm toying with the idea of doing it anyway.
It helps that I spent lots of money there, plus they begged me to work for them part time, which I have, so they kind of owe me, HA HA! It took away from my riding time!:madman:

I actually really enjoy working there. Good people and I love seeing the joy in people's faces when they ride a bike they love, just like me and my bikes..

Mike
 

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Any shop with a decent wheel builder will usually tell you to bring the wheel in without it being built.

It's super annoying to fix someones else out of round/wobbly/uneven mess of a wheel.
 
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