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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i've been hearing some kind of "knocking" or clicking sound on my ss. It's difficult to tell where it is...bottom bracket or freewheel. The LBS that built up my ss took a look at it and it does not seem that the bb is loose. One of the tech guys there said that it might be the freewheel and that his ss makes the same noise. Seems to happen at a higher cadence.

Same tech said that an upgraded freewheel might solve the problem.

Anyone else have this same type of noise?
 

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Are you sure its not the front or rear rotor rubbing funny? That is if you are running disk brakes. As I had I clicking/knocking sound that was caused by a loose wheel bearing. Which was mostly heard while turning and or picking up the cadence
 

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SSOD
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When my ACS freewheel gets really dry it will do this. Take off the center cap with a spanner tool and clean/ relube your bearings and pawls in there. If you don't have a spanner tool you can just put lube around the space where the cog and freewheel meet and rotate the cog. You will slowly work the lube into the innards. It's a pain in the a$$ but it will stop the knocks. When it is full you will notice the grease coming out of the backside of the freewheel and then it should take 10-15 miles for it to loosen back up and work in the new grease.

Edit: Before I got a spanner tool it would take me about 15-20 mins of applying lube, rotating cog, and repeating process to get it properly lubed.
 

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Monkey Junkie
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Crosstown Stew said:
When my ACS freewheel gets really dry it will do this. Take off the center cap with a spanner tool and clean/ relube your bearings and pawls in there. If you don't have a spanner tool you can just put lube around the space where the cog and freewheel meet and rotate the cog. You will slowly work the lube into the innards. It's a pain in the a$$ but it will stop the knocks. When it is full you will notice the grease coming out of the backside of the freewheel and then it should take 10-15 miles for it to loosen back up and work in the new grease.

Edit: Before I got a spanner tool it would take me about 15-20 mins of applying lube, rotating cog, and repeating process to get it properly lubed.
This.

Used to have the same issue with my old Shimano and ACS freewheels. Some people soak them in oil overnight at some point to keep them lubed and quite.
 

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Crosstown Stew said:
When my ACS freewheel gets really dry it will do this. Take off the center cap with a spanner tool and clean/ relube your bearings and pawls in there. If you don't have a spanner tool you can just put lube around the space where the cog and freewheel meet and rotate the cog. You will slowly work the lube into the innards. It's a pain in the a$$ but it will stop the knocks. When it is full you will notice the grease coming out of the backside of the freewheel and then it should take 10-15 miles for it to loosen back up and work in the new grease.

Edit: Before I got a spanner tool it would take me about 15-20 mins of applying lube, rotating cog, and repeating process to get it properly lubed.
Just out of curiousity, how long were you able to go between servicing?
 

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SSOD
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amishscum said:
Just out of curiousity, how long were you able to go between servicing?
Depends on if I ride in the rain or not but for reference I live in Central AL and don't ride in the mud too often. In the last year I serviced it 3 times over about 800 miles on mostly dusty dry conditions. One of those times was after 4 hours riding in really sloppy mud but it was due for a lube anyway.

Similar to 1SPD, I got a WIFW last fall thinking after several years the ACS would soon give out but haven't put it own yet. Got a spanner tool over the winter and took apart the ACS freewheel couple weeks ago. Gave it a good cleaning and lube and the thing I like about the ACS is that the bearings are loose and serviceable, where as the WI freewheel is a sealed cartridge bearing and must be replaced instead of just cleaning it and relubing. I haven't done it yet but for their name and price I would hope they last a long time.

Good luck and if you do decide to get a spanner and clean the bearings, watch out when lifting the cog over the pawls, do it over a clean table with a with napkins or something because there are I think like 30 or so loose ball bearings on each side. They should have grease on them and will be fairly sticky so they won't go bouncing off anywhere but they are small and could get easily lost. Hope this helps
 

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My Shimano freewheel did the same thing. I thought about servicing it, but I just bought a White freewheel instead. In nearly two years of service, it hasn't given me any issues, and hasn't needed a service yet. It's worth every penny.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
hmmmm - i would have to change out my chain ring too...if i go white bros in the back, I might as well go white bros chainring too, eh? right now i'm running a 34 / 17 set up and i don't see a 17t white bros free wheel
 

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Shimano and ACS will knock...

Eventually, pony up for the White Industries and your knocking will cease.
Went through a few cheapo freewheels until I got that, especially if you ride in rain/winter.
Even if you clean/drown them in oil they will knock.
 
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