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A Senior
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67 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a question....
When selecting tires, one should select based on type of riding and terrain. But how do we determine which tire goes on the front of the bike and which one goes on the rear?
I see some tires are reversible in direction (for braking and/or drive traction).

For example some XC riders put a very small tire on the rear of the bieka and a larger more agressive tire up front. Obviously for cornering prowness. But isn't it more or just as important to get a better grip on the rear of the bike?

So if I were to run a combination of tires say Maxxis Ignitor and a Maxxis Crossmark, as some have suggested... which one would go up front? I mounted the Ignitor in the rear to provide some drive traction but am now questioning this decision.

Any combination suggestions?
 

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Is that Bill rated?
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440 Posts
Traction where it matters

You are far more likely to crash because your front tire didn't hook up in a corner or on a downhill than because your rear tire slipped while climbing. If I had those two tires I would mount the Ignitor in the front and the Crossmark in the rear. If you are concerned about your rear traction then a low profile tire like the Crossmark may not be the tire for you, although I have found that it works quite well as a rear tire.
From a rolling resistance standpoint, your rear tire makes a bigger difference than your front so if you will have just one low profile tire most people would prefer it to be the rear tire.
 

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No good in rock gardens..
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4,450 Posts
Bigger goes on the front - the reverse of what motorbikes do. FWIW you may find that your 2.1 Crossmark actually looks fatter than a 2.1 Ignitor, if that's what you are running.

It can come down to what sort of profile you like up front, too - I prefer a squarer profile up front for carving the corners.

Best bet is to play with what you have and see what feels right for you and your terrain - but experiment with pressuers too as they can make a big difference to how a tyre feels and performs.
 
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