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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm 6'6" 230# riding a GF Sugar 2+ XL. I have noticed that my knees are bothering me after long rides with steep climbs. I figured it was due to the slight impact you may get from mt biking. However, since the birth of my son in January, I have been running 2-3 times a week, as I do not have as much time to ride as I used to (only ride 1/week or 1 every 2 weeks). Granted, I only run for about a half an hour whereas I usually ride 2 hours +, but it seems odd to me that I do not experience any knee pain running or after running, but I do feel it after a ride. Maybe it is just the infrequency of my riding. Anyone else experience this or have suggestions on how I may need to change my riding geometry?
 

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I bet you have tendonitis. You might need to let that thing heal for up to six weeks. Advil before and after the ride also helps stop the inflamation. Us big guys can have he combination of very strong legs, overweight bodies and tendons that can' take it.
 

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I would x-post

this over on the riding and training forum. There could be correlations between setup that are contributing to your problems. For me if my seat is to far back it causes some knee discomfort. There are some very knowledgable peeps on the other forum that may be able to help you. Regards Jim S.
 

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Yeah, double check your setup.

Particularly your seat height. Make sure you have proper leg extension. Your body's requirement for proper leg extension can just occur overnite it seems. I never had to worry about exact height until one day my knees started to hurt. Odd? Raise the seat 1 inch and problem went away.

So double check that seat height and experiment with it as one possible factor that may have caused your knee pain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the advice.

I think it is probably my seat height. At 6'6" I like to drop my seat as low as possible during technical descents, then I usually end up pedaling through some flat sections while seated very low. I'll try a few rides where I don't drop the seat and see how they feel.
 

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Yeah, that could be the problem right there. Not being able to straighten your knees out all the way can lead to... issues. I understand the desire to have the seat down in technical stuff, but the ability to get a proper spin going can help with knee pain soooooooooo much.

That, and the bent knee means the end of your power stroke goes into the joint, instead of your pedal, where it belongs.
 

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I have a sugar 3 and I gound that with the genesis geometry you sit way back ofver the rear tire. This puts your knee in a position that causes knee pain. To compensate, move your seat forward so that your knee is over the pedal spindle when the crank is in the 3 o'clock position. Another cause is that your cleats are wore out and gives you shoe a lot of lateral play when riding, thus throwing your knee to the outside or inside....it doesn't take much. Hope this helps, I went through the same thing.
 

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ummm... no

IdahoBiker said:
I have a sugar 3 and I gound that with the genesis geometry you sit way back ofver the rear tire. This puts your knee in a position that causes knee pain...
Actually, if you look at the Gary Fisher website, you'll see that the seat tube angle (the angle that affects your position over the pedals) is between a pretty standard 73 degrees and slightly steeper 74 degrees - steeper (further forward) than most non GG bikes.
 

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IdahoBiker said:
I have a sugar 3 and I gound that with the genesis geometry you sit way back ofver the rear tire. This puts your knee in a position that causes knee pain. To compensate, move your seat forward so that your knee is over the pedal spindle when the crank is in the 3 o'clock position. Another cause is that your cleats are wore out and gives you shoe a lot of lateral play when riding, thus throwing your knee to the outside or inside....it doesn't take much. Hope this helps, I went through the same thing.
Interesting point about the 'play' in the pedals. My old pedals had zero float, but the Shimanos on my new rig have about 5 degrees or so. I haven't noticed an issue yet, but it has taken some getting used to. I have bad knees as it is, and riding is one of the physical activities that gives me the least pain.

Jim
 

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Spinning and seat height ...

uber-stupid said:
Yeah, that could be the problem right there. Not being able to straighten your knees out all the way can lead to... issues. I understand the desire to have the seat down in technical stuff, but the ability to get a proper spin going can help with knee pain soooooooooo much.

That, and the bent knee means the end of your power stroke goes into the joint, instead of your pedal, where it belongs.
I've found that leaving a little knee bend at the bottom of your stroke actually helps with spinning. If you're leg is fully extended at the bottom, it cannot effectively deliver any spin there.
 

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Wait, lets think about this ...

IdahoBiker said:
I have a sugar 3 and I gound that with the genesis geometry you sit way back ofver the rear tire. This puts your knee in a position that causes knee pain. To compensate, move your seat forward so that your knee is over the pedal spindle when the crank is in the 3 o'clock position. Another cause is that your cleats are wore out and gives you shoe a lot of lateral play when riding, thus throwing your knee to the outside or inside....it doesn't take much. Hope this helps, I went through the same thing.
OK, think about this for a second. You would contend that the farther you place your seat back, the more knee pain you will experience. Yet, a recumbant bike is the ultimate in not being over the crank. Those are the bikes they push old folks onto to minimize knee discomfort.

I don't buy you're argument. Knee pain is caused by an unusual and sudden stresses somewhere in your stroke. If you've got pain, I would examine if your feet are perpendicular to the pedals. If your cranking in a duck footed position, you'll effectively be twisting your knees and that can definitely cause pain.
 

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It all makes sense but...

Sure, straightening your cleats, centering your knees over the pedals, and all those other things are important, but if you're like me you still hurt, no matter what you do. In my case, sometimes it's just a little ache; other days it's tough to get out of bed. I can't even put my finger on what causes it. I do have a great treatment, though. I don't want to be advertising here, so check out my web site or contact me directly if you want to hear about this stuff. Good luck!
 

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BigG said:
I'm 6'6" 230# riding a GF Sugar 2+ XL. I have noticed that my knees are bothering me after long rides with steep climbs. I figured it was due to the slight impact you may get from mt biking. However, since the birth of my son in January, I have been running 2-3 times a week, as I do not have as much time to ride as I used to (only ride 1/week or 1 every 2 weeks). Granted, I only run for about a half an hour whereas I usually ride 2 hours +, but it seems odd to me that I do not experience any knee pain running or after running, but I do feel it after a ride. Maybe it is just the infrequency of my riding. Anyone else experience this or have suggestions on how I may need to change my riding geometry?
I am surprised nobody has mentioned some other obvious things. Do you warm up and warm down on your rides with some very light and easy spinning? What about your gearing choices? Are you mashing and pushing a big gear to monster climb up those steep hills at slower rpm's - or do you spin a high revolution cadence like around 85 - 95 rpm's using an easier gear?

Pushing and mashing big gears will have those knees tender and aching - especially if you are running that saddle low. I don't know your age, but knee problems for athletes are much more prevalent in society now with all of the running, jogging and cycling we do. I had arthroscopic knee surgery on my right knee a few years ago and now spend most of my time cycling over running - always making sure to spin easier gears at higher rpm's to save the knees from any pain.

Nice bike by the way. I've got the Sugar 293 XL because I traded in my kids wheels last year and I'm loving the bike and the adult sized wheels.

BB
 

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SeamusCA said:
Interesting point about the 'play' in the pedals. My old pedals had zero float, but the Shimanos on my new rig have about 5 degrees or so. I haven't noticed an issue yet, but it has taken some getting used to. I have bad knees as it is, and riding is one of the physical activities that gives me the least pain.

Jim
My original knees were total junk. My Orthopedic Surgeon and Physical Terrorist are both avid riders. The PT is a former Cat-II Roadie(freak) so I tend to follow thier advice. Whne I started seeing them they both advised me that WRT float more is better, and that I should be on Speedplay Frogs. They reccomend them for all thier knee clients. Luckily I already was on Frogs so it was no big deal for me.

The single most important factor however is a BIKE FIT from a qualified person.. and I don;t mean the sales dude or wrench at the LBS. thay can get you close, but it takes someone with a medical background to dial you in perfectly. BTDT, trust me!

Find a local Sports Medicine Doc or Phsical Terrorist that does bike fits and pay to have it done. Insurance will NOT cover it so expect to shell out $75-100 for your fit, but it will be the best $$$ you ever spend if you are "serious" about cycling. a few mm of adjustment fore/aft, up/down of the bars and seat position can make ALL the difference in the world.

I though my raod bike was adjusted correctly from the LBS, but I could not walk the day after a 50 mile ride. After some _very_minute_ adjustments I though would have no effect at all, I was amazed I could do a Century and actually walk the next day.
 

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well your first problem is, your seekin medical advice from people that have the slightest idea whats going on, before serious injury occurs go to THE PLACE WHERE THEY HAVE TRAINED PROFESSIONALS THAT CAN HELP YOU.......why play around and wait? I no in the states you have for medical treatment, if your feeling pain and its deep then you have problems.... and you want to walk with your family in the future i suggest you find out for peace of mind......


screw these guys, :eek:
 
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