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Installed a King on a faced headtube. I have a bigger gap in the rear than the front below the compresion part of the headset. It looks like it is evenly inserted all the way around. It binds about 1/3 of its full rotation. Any ideas?
Gonna take it out and try again tonight.
 

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teamdicky said:
Installed a King on a faced headtube. I have a bigger gap in the rear than the front below the compresion part of the headset. It looks like it is evenly inserted all the way around. It binds about 1/3 of its full rotation. Any ideas?
Gonna take it out and try again tonight.
Well, it doesn't sound like you pressed it in straight to me. What tool did you use to install it? Also make sure the base plate is properly seated on the fork.
 

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frank n. beans said:
Well, it doesn't sound like you pressed it in straight to me. What tool did you use to install it? Also make sure the base plate is properly seated on the fork.
Used a headset press. Base plate is secure and happy. I spoke with King and they said that the previous user (it was used) might have ran it on an unfaced headtube.
crap.
 

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teamdicky said:
Used a headset press. Base plate is secure and happy. I spoke with King and they said that the previous user (it was used) might have ran it on an unfaced headtube.
crap.
That is a bummer.

All of you "facing a head tube is not necessary" and "just pound it in with a block of wood" home mechanics take note.
 

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frank n. beans said:
That is a bummer.

All of you "facing a head tube is not necessary" and "just pound it in with a block of wood" home mechanics take note.
Facing a HT is always necessary, it's just usually done by the manufacturer before the frame leaves the factory. At least with the better brands. I always check mine to be sure before I build.

This guy's problem has nothing to do with the method of installation. I'd rather have a competent mechanic use the block of wood method than a minimum wage novice touch my frame with a park headset press.
 

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fonseca said:
This guy's problem has nothing to do with the method of installation. I'd rather have a competent mechanic use the block of wood method than a minimum wage novice touch my frame with a park headset press.
Clap-clap-clap! 10-4 on all that fons!
 

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teamdicky said:
Installed a King on a faced headtube. I have a bigger gap in the rear than the front below the compresion part of the headset. It looks like it is evenly inserted all the way around. It binds about 1/3 of its full rotation. Any ideas?
Gonna take it out and try again tonight.
I'd love to have a go at that headset with my 2x4 and hammer.
 

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ka pow

fonseca said:
This guy's problem has nothing to do with the method of installation. I'd rather have a competent mechanic use the block of wood method than a minimum wage novice touch my frame with a park headset press.
Good point. It still makes me cringe when I think about pounding in a King headset though, regardless of who is operating the hammer.
 

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frank n. beans said:
Good point. It still makes me cringe when I think about pounding in a King headset though, regardless of who is operating the hammer.
Why would you cringe? How many have you wrecked by this method? I've installed maybe a couple of dozen (Kings that is, many dozens of other makes) and haven't come close to damaging one. I once stopped a frame maker (who'd just made my frame) from installing mine cock-eyed with a fancy press and I finished it off easily with my block of wood and hammer that I'd taken along in anticipation of such an occurence.
 

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frank n. beans said:
Good point. It still makes me cringe when I think about pounding in a King headset though, regardless of who is operating the hammer.
You don't need to resort to a hammer to install a headset at home. This setup has round pieces of wood glued to the square pieces, that just fit inside the headset to keep everything nice and square. It cost less than $5, and I've done five headset installs with it with no problems.
 

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whatever works I guess

Mike T. said:
Why would you cringe? How many have you wrecked by this method? I've installed maybe a couple of dozen and haven't come close to damaging one. I once stopped a frame maker (who'd just made my frame) from installing mine cock-eyed with a fancy press and I finished it off easily with my block of wood and hammer that I'd taken along in anticipation of such an occurence.
I know it works - I have done it myself (block of wood method). Of course using a headset press does not guarantee success. You have to pay attention to what you are doing with either method. I just think that the linear application of pressure that you get from a headset press is a better method than pounding. Same thing for hub bearings or suspension frame bearings. I'm sure I could tap them in with a hammer, but I have a feeling it is much quicker / accurate / more consistent to press them in. I don't know. It is just smoother. I like smoothness.
 

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Nice

VT Mike said:
You don't need to resort to a hammer to install a headset at home. This setup has round pieces of wood glued to the square pieces, that just fit inside the headset to keep everything nice and square. It cost less than $5, and I've done five headset installs with it with no problems.
Very nice. The "round pieces of wood glued to the square pieces" is very smart - keep everything pointed nice and straight. I like it. How did you cut the round pieces of wood, and how far do they extend into the cups?
 
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