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Anyone know anything about the CPSC law about lead that is going into effect? I've been looking on Google and it seems any bike with 24 inch or smaller wheels is considered a toy and going to have to conform to the same Laws as Toys. Looks like the cost of a kids bike is going to get a lot higher if a company has to test every model in every size and color and one from each batch built.

Will kids cycling go the way of LawnDarts???
 

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ballbuster
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Seriously

Razorfish said:
Why would any bike have lead paint.
I mean, lead makes for some really great colors, and durable paint.... that is, if you can live with the whole toxic thing... which I can't. I'll take dull colors over nervous system damage.

That said, aren't most bikes powder coated these days anyway? Somehow I thought powder coating makes a better finish with less labor, and cheaper than cheap paint anyway.

The high end hand built stuff is typically painted, cause it gives a better candy-like finish, not to mention two or more tones and special stuff like that.
 

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i call it a kaiser blade
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pimpbot said:
I mean, lead makes for some really great colors, and durable paint.... that is, if you can live with the whole toxic thing... which I can't. I'll take dull colors over nervous system damage.

That said, aren't most bikes powder coated these days anyway? Somehow I thought powder coating makes a better finish with less labor, and cheaper than cheap paint anyway.

The high end hand built stuff is typically painted, cause it gives a better candy-like finish, not to mention two or more tones and special stuff like that.
powder coating is still more expensive.

it's more durable.

my three year old cove handjob has no scratches on it.

my near new el santo is scratched to hell.
 

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Bikemonkeys said:
Spoke nipples are made with lead in the metal. And all companies will have to prove that their product doesn't have any lead.
It's actually not elimination of all lead. The criterion is
'100 ppm as of August 14, 2011, if technologically feasible.
. That's 100 ppm by total weight, so 1 g of lead in a 22# bike if technologically feasible. 600ppm by this coming Feb, 6g of lead in a 22# bike. What does a kid's bike weigh anyway?

http://www.cpsc.gov/ABOUT/Cpsia/101rfc.pdf

They are taking through Aug 09 to evaluate 'inaccessable' parts of a toy. You can look here, the toy biz on p. 39 specifies interest in bicycles: http://www.cpsc.gov/ABOUT/Cpsia/comments/101comments.pdf

The WA toxic toy bill that the fed one was based on specifically exempted bicycles. The fed one does not in the text of the law but they would be expected to be addressed in the rules that are determined to enforce the law.

The tricky part is how to define alloyed lead as inaccessable without also including the lead-y jewelry that is one of the initial targets of the law. A kid is not going to gnaw on alloyed brass spoke nipples the way they might a necklace or ring. I don't know where copper rivets on Levi's sort out on the gnaw-ability scale.

As far as disposable IQ points and neurotoxins, I'm fine paying extra for low-lead spoke nipples if it does come to that.
 

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I live to bike
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pimpbot said:
I mean, lead makes for some really great colors, and durable paint.... that is, if you can live with the whole toxic thing... which I can't.
Quick question. Isn't the whole toxic thing only if you ingest it? Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you only get lead poisoning from the paint if you're eating the paint chips? I've never been one to lick my bike. My son has never taken to licking his, either. Wouldn't have been very difficult to stop him from licking it when he was younger and may have actually thought to do so.
 

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Enthusiast
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Jwiffle said:
Quick question. Isn't the whole toxic thing only if you ingest it? Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you only get lead poisoning from the paint if you're eating the paint chips?
There is the dust-factor too. People used to worry only about chipped paint in houses, but then researchers discovered that simple things like opening and closing your window sash would generate lead-contaminated dust that would build up over time and cause problems for kids.

I'm sometimes dumbfounded over lead. We've known it's toxic for what, 2000 years or so now? Yet we still use it in a surprising number of places. I had no idea until now that I had to worry about it being in my bikes. Sheesh.
 

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If you are restoring the bike, sanding/scraping the paint, or welding on painted metal then you should definitely find out if the paint has lead. If you are riding it, there is really no cause for concern. I am a certified lead inspector/assessor and project monitor in CA and trust me lead in your intact bike paint is an almost immeasurably small risk compared with the many other risks of bike riding.
 

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rancherbiker
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Thanks ukemike, I was about to jump in and and scold the absurdity of some folks. So many of these toxic hazards that have been defined by our regulatory agencies were defined based on certain exposure conditions and then they get misconstrued and taken out of context. I don't see kid's bikes being bygone like lawn darts over required lead testing. As one reasonable person mentioned, neither he nor his son lick their bikes let alone chew on them.
Look at your parents and your grandparents, there is no mass epidemic due to long time exposure due to lead poisoning from all the consumed gasoline and consequent exhaust produced when gasoline had lead in it. Just use common sense and don't worry yourselves into a sick state of existence. And all the houses that had lead paint in them. Honestly, I don't hear ANY cases of it in SW Colorado. Your risk if being hit by an irresponsible phone texting car driver while you are on your bicycle is far greater than your or your kid getting any residual effects of lead poisoning in our day and age. The levels that the EPA and other regulatory agencies place in law aren't just right on the lethal edge, they have a safety factor built in. So if a regulation says that the lead content hypothetically can't exceed 30ppm and the product has 31ppm, it's rejected. If it has 30ppm it's okay. Something to compare that to? 30 sips of coffee, 31 sips of coffee, 30 M&M's, 31 M&M's...I can't claim the same credentials as ukemike, but I do work in a field where I am exposed to hazards on a regular basis.
sorry if I offended anybody. but Lead paint and bikes?
J
 

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Well now see, I have to disagree here as well. Lead is a real poison, and it is a real threat, but just not in bicycle paint. Nearly every building has lead in paint. Renovations are routinely conducted where the lead regulations are simply ignored. The problem is that low blood lead levels tend to have very subtle long term consequences that we often don't notice. More extreme exposures can have effects that are hard to distinguish from the symptoms of the flu or getting old. In children the effects can be much more profound, and still hard to distinguish. If your toddler has high blood lead and ends up with an adult IQ of 100 (when she might have been 120 w/out the lead) how would you know?

In industry where there are lead exposures (construction, radiator repair, car battery recycling) in homes with deteriorating paint, and in home renovations lead is a real, present, and serious hazard. In toys that get put in mouths (especially that crappy gumball machine jewelry) it is a crime and sometime kills. On a bike in good condition, I'm not worried.

Keep on Bikin'
 

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This lead law for bicycles & motorcycles [50,65,85,105cc] is just such a joke.It really hit the motorcycle industry really bad for the first part of 2009 as no motorcycle dealer could sell minibikes, parts etc.I mean there was little kids protesting with T-shirts on that read "I just want to ride, I promise I won't eat it"
 

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rancherbiker
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You're right ukemike, there are lot of old houses/housing out there with some considerably higher concentrations of lead paint potential. I did notice in my reading that a blood test can be performed to test for high concentrations. I gutted my house and refinished the interior before we had our kids, 10 and 12. They are both excelling well in school. I probably exposed myself to much more when I renovated. Looking back, I wish I would have just covered the original walls/paint with sheetrock. Unfortunately, all in all it sounds as though it is nearly impossible to quantify the effects of lead paint as a whole in the world when there are so many other sources of similar symptoms. In any case, me and my kids will still keep cycling! :)
 

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jalopy jockey
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HardyWeinberg said:
It's actually not elimination of all lead. The criterion is . That's 100 ppm by total weight, so 1 g of lead in a 22# bike if technologically feasible. 600ppm by this coming Feb, 6g of lead in a 22# bike. What does a kid's bike weigh anyway?
Most are in the 20s. My son's is 23 or 24 I think. Trek MT60 with no mods. Soon to get new rubber.
 
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