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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing a 40 mile ride along a creek and was wondering how to keep my feet warm during the ride. The temp is predicted to between 30 and 40. If any has a good solution please let me know.
 

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I have 2006 Lake MXZ300s. I only where normal summer socks in them, and they are good to 30°F for about 2hours. When I gets colder, I use chemical toe warmers.
 

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I have the Sidi winter boots, with them, a set of good Smart Wool socks, a neoprene booty my feet do pretty good for 4+ hours in anything down to about 20 deg. If it's colder or wetter I will bring the chemical warmers with me and when they start to get cold put them under the booty on top of the shoe above my toes. This usually warms my feet back up.

The key is not to have things super tight, it cuts off the circulation to the feet and that's where your warmth comes from. I used to pack my shoes with thicker socks, only to get colder.

Another option is the Gore windstopper socks, they work for breaking the wind and keeping water off the feet.

Hope that helps.

Get your shoes at least a size larger than normal, I take what I normally wear with me to try shoes on to make sure they are big enough.
 

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I found that getting water in the boot was a diaster for cold.

So, I put a bunch of silicone seal around the openings created by the cleats in the sole.

This keeps the water out really good, and the silicone just gets pushed out of the way, by the pedal clasps.

While it is only water proof for say a month, it is pretty easy to do.

I have the mesh uppers and I use toe covers to keep the water out. Buddy uses the neaporene full shoe covers, as do alot of brits (see some threads), but he finds that he sweats to much for the neoprene style, maybe some gortex shoe covers.

I just bought some shimano winter shoes, and they are good down to at least -20 C for an hour, and I haven't even started with heavy soaks and insoles etc.
 

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Use the hand warmers for skiers, they work well. Also, use a plastic bag over your sock, that works well for the budget minded.:thumbsup:
 

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The really hard question is....

....What do you do when the ride starts off at around 35F and then climbs up to 70-80F? I'm curious since recon has provided me with these sort of figures for the LT100 and in no way am I even remotely accustomed to that low a temp or such a significant temp change in a day.
 

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Really 35F, 2C should pose no problem at all especially in a race setting.

Warmup your shoes, with a heater, don't get wet with a plastic bag.

You might get a twinge of cold if it is really fast say some downhill at the start, with practise you can wiggle your toes to stay quite warm.

All that said your in bermuda?? put your shoes on, get an cooler fill it with ice and go sit in the shade for an hour. Shouldn't be to bad, i'll bet your feet get cold where the cleat is.
 

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Hubby and I have had the same problem lately with the low temps here. Wool socks definitely helped. We went from our Sidi shoes back to the thicker soled Shimano's that are cloth material (not as much wind gets through). We both tried booties over the Sidi's, and that didn't help a whole lot. Haven't tried the plastic bags yet, but that's next on the list!

I also read someone say to put duct tape (or similar) underneath the sole in your shoes so no air gets in from under the cleat area.
 

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ride hard- let the toes breath

I have the Lake Winter Shoes and they are comfortable over a wide range of temps. Previously I swore by Sealskinz kayak socks, they work like the plastic bag but help with the warmth. for 35+ degrees riding hard should be all the warmth you need and when that doesn't work jump off the bike and run.
Whatever method you use just makes sure you don't squeeze too much into the shoe and end up with circulation issues. Feet can generate a lot of heat as long as there aren't three layers of socks strangling them.
 

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LyNx said:
....What do you do when the ride starts off at around 35F and then climbs up to 70-80F? I'm curious since recon has provided me with these sort of figures for the LT100 and in no way am I even remotely accustomed to that low a temp or such a significant temp change in a day.
Drink lots and lots of coffee before the start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the all the helpful tips.

I tried Seal Skinz in 30 degrees and near froze my toes off. The seal skinz sock did not let water or wind in nor did it let my sweat out. So by the end of a 2 hour ride my feet were soaking wet and cold. I hope one of these Ideas work. Again thanks
 

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The single biggest improvement, to modify summer boots was to put in a nice thick insole, that insulated the cleat from the foot.

After all the cleat is attached to a big aluminium radiator.
 

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I have horrible circulation problems in my toes, especially my right foot. I have tried everything. This what I have come up with, and it has worked at less than 18F with 20+ winds, and I was roasty toasty.

Lake winter boots, mtb version. The roads have too much surface area on the bottom. The Lakes are also superior to all the others because there is a neoprene sock sewn in, and it breaths well. It has a heavier upper and a second neoprene wrap around the ankle. The insole is compressed wool. Before you put the cleats on, put duct tape over the entire area. They are not waterproof, but you can pick up some beeswax and fix 'em right up. The other good thing is you won't wear the boots as often so they will last years. I've had mine for three.

Chemical warmers stuck to the top of your socks, over your toes. Careful when you put on the shoe as you can bunch up the warmer.

Wick Wear socks. (www.wickwearsports.com) The company is 1.5 years old. They make Smartwool feel like sandpaper and are way warmer. I used to have issues below 40 degrees with my toes going numb. With the Wick Wear, I can wear the socks and Sidi's, no problems. I road home from work in 35 degrees with Wick Wear wool, toe warmers, and Sidi's with happy feet.
 

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Frozen Feet on the start to Columbine

LyNx
The really hard question is....

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

....What do you do when the ride starts off at around 35F and then climbs up to 70-80F? I'm curious since recon has provided me with these sort of figures for the LT100 and in no way am I even remotely accustomed to that low a temp or such a significant temp change in a day.
I might be off base here but I don't think many of the LT100 racers have major cold/issues at the start line with their feet. I know I haven't (so of course that means no one else does right, ha ha) Yes its cold at the start but if your feet can stand it for 20-30 min you will soon be warm. I have a "raining hard at the start" plan but have yet to need it.

Waiting at the start you will see the FULL range of outer-wear--- long sleeve jerseys, light to heavy jackets, windbreakers, leg & arm warmers ect etc. I have never really looked to see if any/many were wearing something "extra" on there feet at a dry/start line. If it's raining during the start I am sure most would show up with a little something extra for the feet, I will.

IMO you should carry at least an wp outer layer, one that works for YOU, to keep at min your TORSO/CORE warm/dry during potential bad weather/rain. (Some riders seem to skip this; I guess they are relying on the race organization to play hypothermia catch for them:eekster: ) The start can be dry/cold, later might get a little light cold/snow on a climb to columbine and later in the afternoon rain on the plain etc etc

All most all riders have some type of reasonable add/subtract layering scheme for at least their torso/arms. Many, if not most, also include something for their lower legs. Some, but certainly not all, for all the above plus their feet, like some type of extra layer/bag/thicker wool/gore-tex sock etc for their feet.

I know it might not be as easy for you if you fly in but many of the riders show up with a fairly wide range of clothing choices and pick their final "race day" layers based on a few test/trial pre-rides plus the expected conditions per that night's forecast.

Good Luck on the lotto, won't be long now
 

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LyndaW said:
Drink lots and lots of coffee before the start.
lol......that's been my routine this winter. Get up and have a nice early start time for the ride, but quickly bail to local coffee shop and drink coffee until it warms up. :blush:
 
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