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Not to take anything away from those kids, they certainly have some crazy skills, but this is actually made possible by three bike factors.

1. Light bike. Those Cults are pretty fantastic bikes. A friend's kid has one. They are both legit BMX bikes, and very light. Weight matters when you are 35lb.

2. Small wheels. The parents have not moved their kid up in wheel size, despite the fact that those kids could easily handle a bigger bike. The fact is, they can handle smaller wheels better than larger wheels. Most parents get their kids a bike that they can "grow into". Huge mistake. Get them a bike that they can grow out of. They will ride it more, enjoy it more, be able to handle it better, and ultimately become better bikers.

3. The bikes are simple. No shifters, no suspension, no extra crap. In most cases, shifting is not important for little kids, and only distracts from learning true bike handling skills. In most cases it is just extra weight that the kid never uses. They usually put it into the gear that they like, and then never touch it again. Worse is when they put it into a gear that they don't like, then never touch it again, and ride it less because of it. As for suspension, most suspension forks for bikes less than 26" are junk or crazy expensive. White Bros are good, Spinner can be made OK, everything else is junk. The compression weights on most forks are so high that it may as well be rigid, and they often weigh 5+ lb. Proportionally, think about putting a 20+ lb fork on your bike that needs 600lb of force to compress it, and then only gets 1" of travel. You can get a rigid fork that has effectively as much travel and have it weigh a fraction of that. The only tech I like on kids bikes are hydro disc brakes. Little hands need short pull brakes that are easy to pull and have good modulation. They are a little overkill for most bikes, but at least the kid gets some benefit, as opposed to all drawback.

Anyway, your kid's bike actually matters more than your bike as far as what it will do for their riding ability, and choosing well can make your kid a rider, or make the bike an expensive garage obstacle without a rider. With some forethought, any kid will ride better. Maybe not all will have the natural aptitude of these two, but you can at least decide not to limit them by what they ride.
 

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Those kids are killing it - any of you guys ride a spine lately? Personally, I find 'em pretty intimidating. And that step up at the end was sweet. Totally awesome vid, brought me back 4 or 5 years to when my kid was the littlest shredder at the park.

:thumbsup:

Though I strongly agree with much of what Lee says, specially re: smaller wheels, for whatever reason, bike weight is one thing that has never been an issue for my kid (or me for that matter). Braking for park riding isn't all that important either (though for trail riding, it's obvisouly a different story). Off the shelf Haro 116's have served us well. YMMV of course.

Mine at 5, soon as he figured out that BMX wasn't just about racing.
 

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Rye Airfield, NH seacoast. Place is awesome.





 

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Great video! Wehave a little skate park here in town, and I ought to get a small BMX bike for my daughter. She likes taking the scooter over there.
I especially like the little bit at the end with the boysjust starting out on the wood ramp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
They certainly are good bikes. Why are they so pricey in the UK though - £349.99 ($585!!!!) compared to $339.99 in the US!?

My 3 year old does ride a 16" bike that is probably harder for him to handle than a 12" BMX, but the huge positives of the larger wheels for longer distances and bumpier/rootier trails suits the type of riding we mostly do.

However if a very cheap Cult 12 popped up I wouldn't say no ;)
 
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