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Discussion Starter #1
Completely disassembled for cleaning and re-greasing. Feel really good about it. I have always done my own minor adjustments but now starting to take a more hands on approach to my bike. Like everything else in this world, there is a real sense of accomplishment and security when doing things yourself. It is really nice to know everything was cleaned and re-greased properly. Going to do my hubs next. My bike is a 2012 so it's been about 4 years since it was built. It is due for an overhaul. For those who are thinking about it or are anxious just go for it and take it slow. Lay everything out as it comes off so you know the order it goes back. YouTube is an invaluable resource.
 

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ACHOO
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Nicely done. I agree about the DIY. I'm very slow, and constantly have to read up on new service bits. Oh, and sometimes I don't have the right tool. But at the end of the day, I've done as good a job as anyone else - and probably saved some cash - even with random tool purchases.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nicely done. I agree about the DIY. I'm very slow, and constantly have to read up on new service bits. Oh, and sometimes I don't have the right tool. But at the end of the day, I've done as good a job as anyone else - and probably saved some cash - even with random tool purchases.
Saving money was the main reason I'm trying my hand at servicing. I am feeling the economic crunch right now and don't have a lot of money to burn. I am lucky that I've accumulated tools over the years so I have much of what I need for most jobs. Just needed a cone wrench for the hubs and am trying to find a lockring wrench locally so I can do the rear hub.
 

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ACHOO
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Seems like if you buy a tool, and use it twice, you've saved money, right? I also enjoy working on my bike.

As a real life example, I bought a new bike for my son, and changed a few bits on it. I found the chain was routed incorrectly through the rear derailleur, and some moron had bashed on the splines for the cranks. I guess my point is that you can get pretty good yourself, and in some cases do better than *some* bike shops.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Agreed. There is a real sense of accomplishment and security when you do things yourself. You know how things look and know it's done right. Like I said, I feel real good about it. Should have tried my hand at it long ago.
 

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For me, its not even about saving money. I just love to work on my bikes. I work on my brother's bike and my friends drop their bikes off to have me work on them as well. Something about going to my little corner of the garage, where I have my workstation set up. I turn up the music, pop open a brew, have my dog sleeping nearby on the cold concrete floor and it just relaxing time for me. Its my alone time and the longer I'm down there, the more relaxed I am. I've had friends bring their bikes to me for a simple adjustment and I end up tearing down their whole bike to lean all their parts, re-grease, lube up their pivots and chain. Have even serviced their forks without them asking since I do all their forks anyways. A man and his tools is an awesome time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I totally get where you are coming from. I felt pretty nervous doing it because it was the first time, but I definitely feel a sense of satisfaction when I'm working with my tools. It's almost zen like.
 
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