Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Even though the folks at Trek took their time and correctly sized my Marlin 5 to me, it's never fit quite the way I wanted it to. As I've mentioned several times before, it was like I was welded in place and couldn't move around on the bike the way I wanted to.

Well after many hours of reading through the forums and thinking about my body build (short legs with a long torso and arms) I decided to take a chance and buy a few parts that my reading seemed to point to. I first bought an adjustable 110mm, 0-60 degree stem.


This helped get my arms extended some more, but put even more weight over the front wheel, and I still couldn't mover around as much as I wanted to.

Back to reading threads.

Ah-ha, at last I found a thread discussing handlebar rise on a downhill/free ride bike. In the thread the consensus was evenly split between "go for it" and "you're wasting your money for a DH bike.

Hmmm more research ensued.

Found a few more threads, and buried in one of them was advice for using handlebars with a moderate rise to fit the bike to the rider better.

Well nothing ventured..

So I order a Deity 80mm rise 760mm wide handlebar.

I spent the last hour or so installing and adjusting the bars and stem riser to the bike, then went for a ride.

HOLY SMOKES what a difference! :yikes:

After a few tweaks, it's like a whole new bike! :eekster: I'm in a much more comfortable position, My weight is almost centered on the saddle, I can move around like I want to, and standing on the pedals for power doesn't result in nearly as much squish from the front suspension as before. Shoot, I was able to ride a wheelie for about 15', something that I've never been able to do before. :eekster:

I had almost given up on getting this bike to fit the way I want it to, and I can't believe how much just a few parts has changed to feel of the bike.

I can't wait to hit Iron Hill Friday!







 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,872 Posts
whatever it takes! that beach cruiser position is definitely not my cup o' tea, but if it makes riding confident and fun, go for it. you might need to replace the shifter cable/ housing with a longer one.

I have concerns for the long-term durability of that stem for trail use though. you might want to look for a stem that will get you in the same position but without the flimsy hinge.

serious question- have you asked a doctor about your mobility? I worked in bike shops for six years and the only time I saw anyone with a handlebar that high were older folks with severe back issues.
 

·
Bikesexual
Joined
·
7,568 Posts
Well, big kudos for doing research!

Saddles are very personal, but that one doesn't look that comfy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I worked in bike shops for six years and the only time I saw anyone with a handlebar that high were older folks with severe back issues.
That's me.I would love to trade my back for a 25year old model but unfortunately I'm stuck with my OEM equipment.

Also once I get everything worked out, I'll probably replace the stem with a fixed version.
 

·
Thinking about riding.
Joined
·
2,169 Posts
That's me.I would love to trade my back for a 25year old model but unfortunately I'm stuck with my OEM equipment.
Those changes should suit you well then, you've essentially turned it into a comfort bike like a Trek Verve - but of course with MTB capabilities. You'll definitely need to do something about that brake hose though, it's way too tight.
 

·
g=9.764m/s2
Joined
·
808 Posts
Hell No, I wouldn’t trust that adjustable stem at Iron Hill or any trail unless you are just doin slow-roll. I’m all for those 80mm Deity Highside bars...just put them on a ‘14 Stache I built for my wife. It has a Thudbuster LT seat-post which resulted is long reach so did a 35mm stem with the Highside and she can ride in a comfortable upright position. Works great for me as well.
 

Attachments

·
Advanced Slacker
Joined
·
15,323 Posts
That's me.I would love to trade my back for a 25year old model but unfortunately I'm stuck with my OEM equipment.
I hear you. I wish I were 25 just so I would take better care of mine than I did.

Also once I get everything worked out, I'll probably replace the stem with a fixed version.
Probably a wise thing to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Even though the folks at Trek took their time and correctly sized my Marlin 5 to me, it's never fit quite the way I wanted it to. As I've mentioned several times before, it was like I was welded in place and couldn't move around on the bike the way I wanted to.

Well after many hours of reading through the forums and thinking about my body build (short legs with a long torso and arms) I decided to take a chance and buy a few parts that my reading seemed to point to. I first bought an adjustable 110mm, 0-60 degree stem.

This helped get my arms extended some more, but put even more weight over the front wheel, and I still couldn't mover around as much as I wanted to.

Back to reading threads.

Ah-ha, at last I found a thread discussing handlebar rise on a downhill/free ride bike. In the thread the consensus was evenly split between "go for it" and "you're wasting your money for a DH bike.

Hmmm more research ensued.

Found a few more threads, and buried in one of them was advice for using handlebars with a moderate rise to fit the bike to the rider better.

Well nothing ventured..

So I order a Deity 80mm rise 760mm wide handlebar.

I spent the last hour or so installing and adjusting the bars and stem riser to the bike, then went for a ride.

HOLY SMOKES what a difference! :yikes:

After a few tweaks, it's like a whole new bike! :eekster: I'm in a much more comfortable position, My weight is almost centered on the saddle, I can move around like I want to, and standing on the pedals for power doesn't result in nearly as much squish from the front suspension as before. Shoot, I was able to ride a wheelie for about 15', something that I've never been able to do before. :eekster:

I had almost given up on getting this bike to fit the way I want it to, and I can't believe how much just a few parts has changed to feel of the bike.

I can't wait to hit Iron Hill Friday!
Referred here from a thread that I started myself.

Sounds similar to my findings. 6' tall with 32" inseam. Rode a 2019 marlin 6 size L around the block a few times. Ordered a Marlin 7 L. The Marlin 7 comes with round grips where the 6 had contour type. Riding the 7 is OK, but I feel it in the wrists and between the shoulder blades and neck. It feels like a bit more backsweep is what my wrists want and either up, back, or both with the bars. First time out I wore a ball cap. I found that I had to cock my head quite far back as expected in order to see out ahead under the bill.

I was looking at the Deity black label bars in 38mm rise. Not sure I will go so far as 80mm though. No shifter or brake hose issues with that much bar?

One thing I should add is I plan to do a PNW Coast dropper/suspension seat post which I'm guessing adds a bit of offset and shifts me back a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
I've used a post like that before to help with adjusting my bikepacking rig. Since I use a Jones H-Bar, getting the height of the bar and the angle set to where I can ride 10+ hours takes some tweaking. Although not sitting upright, I am not down on the bars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Hoping I can get some good guidance from my LBS and avoid a lot of trial and error. I see now how the adjustable stem would be a great tool for testing to help get the bar height figured out.
 

·
since 4/10/2009
Joined
·
34,575 Posts
I was looking at the Deity black label bars in 38mm rise. Not sure I will go so far as 80mm though. No shifter or brake hose issues with that much bar?
It depends. Both adding rise AND adding width to handlebars will require extra length for cables and hoses. What matters is how much extra there is on the bike (they're not all the same) and what the difference is from your current handlebar configuration to the new one. I've made changes before that required replacing shift cable/housing because it was too short to accommodate the extra required length, but I have yet to need to replace hydro hose for the same reason. I also haven't made such large changes in handlebar rise before. Usually, I'm only changing about 20mm at most to fine tune fit.

Adjustable stems like that are great for helping to identify what needs to happen for fit purposes, but they're terrible for actually riding. They even creak and wobble on comfort bikes. Not only that, but I have a feeling that OP isn't going to be able to find a fixed stem that'll be able to put the bars in that position. Certainly nothing I can think of that's mtb-worthy.

I have a feeling that the bike is going to have some weight distribution issues for mtb riding. Regardless of comfort, riding a mtb sorta demands your body weight be centered between the wheels, and intentionally biasing it onto the saddle is going to introduce some undesirable handling effects from lessening the weight on the front. Traction issues with cornering. Difficulties with climbing. That kinda stuff.

I have a friend who developed major back issues. He bought a recumbent and spends the vast majority of his time on that bike. He simply can't tolerate an upright bike very well anymore. He pulls out his mtb occasionally, but never for very long or technical rides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,872 Posts
I have a feeling that the bike is going to have some weight distribution issues for mtb riding.
That's what I was thinking, but I didn't want to be that direct and risk discouraging him. Riding trails with any amount of difficulty is going to be a struggle, but based on what little I know about OP, he'll probably get by OK. With any luck, strength, endurance, and flexibility will improve over the miles and his bike can evolve to keep up. If not, at least the bike is comfortable enough to be fun so he can go explore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I've got some back issues from a severely pinched nerve a couple of months ago. I have a Marlin and riding it was not really possible, back was very painful and hands numb after an hour ride with the 90mm stem and stock bars so I put on a 30mm stem and 50mm riser Deity for a more upright riding position and it is way more comfortable. It also made the bike way more trail worthy for me but mainly use it as my sidewalk bomber around town. I also have a Stache that is my fun bike. My legs are back to around 80% and my back is around 40% of pre-injury. I was having trouble getting my front wheel up, my back just wouldn't participate. I put a 80mm riser from Deity on it and manuals and bunny hops are possible again and it is a really comfortable bike. Here is a very helpful video I found while try to figure out why my hands were going numb.
In trying to protect my back I had changed my riding position and was bending my wrists more than you should. After seeing the video I went on an hour ride with proper hand and wrist placement, no wrist pain but was not a good time on my back. With the riser bars, wrist position is proper and back pain is reduced to reasonable levels. I think both riser bars are on to stay.

The 80mm riser bar is not a cable issue with the Stache. I just put on the brakes, shifter, dropper before mounting the bar to the stem.

Weight distribution for me is fine. I'm biased weight forward naturally, thick through chest and shoulders. I'm not an aggressive speed rider, I'm more of a fun rider always looking for something to bump jump and live in Texas. Descents are limited to riding down a creek channel and climbs are just back up the other side, neither are very steep but both have some chunk, roots, and erosion holes that require a light front wheel to get through on trails that are windy and tree gated so speed is not really an option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
701 Posts
I did similar parts upgrade (?) to my old bike before I gave it to my GF. She preferred a "cruiser" type ride for now until she feels more confident before deciding to hit the trails with me. Works well for urban trails/cycle paths or non-technical rides.

Unfortunately I pinched my sciatic nerve last week along with pulling my lower back muscles. The GF's ride looks more inviting to ride than my bike. Oy ve!! Cruel biking gods!!!
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top