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I try to maintain a respectable rate of RPM's when I ride, but at times will ramp it up to about 110 RPM's depending on my training schedule. Of course, gearing (resistance) is the game changer.

You?
 

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The interval thing works.
 

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Intervals of ski lift and downhill eh Meat LMAO.....
 
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What ever keeps my heart rate pegged at 190bpm. Usually that is about 69rpm. You know, gets the blood pumping.
:alien:
 

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I used to pedal slowwwww until I got into road cycling. I eventually developed liking a cadance of about 90. I think it takes a certain amount of cardio training to make it doable. A higher cadance definitely has my heart rate a bit higher even at roughly the same speed/power.

It's tough to keep cadence high on a mtb. Fat tires and low pressures can get bouncy unless your technique is nothing short of perfection. Also a lot of sections are to rough to keep fast cadence. Sometimes you need some extra leverage that you can't get spinning a high cadence.
 

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Yeah, take a avid flat lander roadie mtbing and you figure that out quick.


Not all of them, some of the best racers and climbers grew up training in the flatlands. A big gear can make anywhere an interval.

I'm doing some low cadence-high power riding for awhile. Like 50-60rpm.
 

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I confess, I am a masher. Probably why I enjoy singlespeed. I think I do pretty well spinning when I'm on the road bike, though. But on the mtb, I just prefer a higher ratio of forward movement to my pedal pushing and feel I have more control with a lower cadence as it's easier to accelerate to get over an obstacle.
 
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I confess, I am a masher. Probably why I enjoy singlespeed. I think I do pretty well spinning when I'm on the road bike, though. But on the mtb, I just prefer a higher ratio of forward movement to my pedal pushing and feel I have more control with a lower cadence as it's easier to accelerate to get over an obstacle.
Absolutely. On road I’m looking to use gears for rpm. On mtb looking for pedal/leg power more
 

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Out spokin'
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I try to maintain a respectable rate of RPM's when I ride, but at times will ramp it up to about 110 RPM's depending on my training schedule. Of course, gearing (resistance) is the game changer.

You?
Please define "respectable." :unsure:
As for me, I typically feel lucky just to be able to successfully respond to whatever the terrain deals.
=sParty
 

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I used to pedal slowwwww until I got into road cycling. I eventually developed liking a cadance of about 90. I think it takes a certain amount of cardio training to make it doable. A higher cadance definitely has my heart rate a bit higher even at roughly the same speed/power.

It's tough to keep cadence high on a mtb. Fat tires and low pressures can get bouncy unless your technique is nothing short of perfection. Also a lot of sections are to rough to keep fast cadence. Sometimes you need some extra leverage that you can't get spinning a high cadence.
I've been trying to keep around 90 during climbs as well. I find this keeps my legs fresher for the downhills.
 

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If I was going to "train" for mtbiking again, I'd buy another fixie. Power, cadence, and form...riding a fixed gear bike through rolling hills will iron out all manner of inefficiencies for you. It also teaches you new things about conserving momentum. I miss it.
 

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I've been trying to keep around 90 during climbs as well. I find this keeps my legs fresher for the downhills.
Definitely! Same power but less force exerted on the legs!

I'd love to upgrade to 12 speed for that but still on 11 speed with 46t cassette for now.
 

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If I was going to "train" for mtbiking again, I'd buy another fixie. Power, cadence, and form...riding a fixed gear bike through rolling hills will iron out all manner of inefficiencies for you. It also teaches you new things about conserving momentum. I miss it.
I thought about that shortly after getting my SS, but figured I'd maim myself in the process.
 

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So brutal on the knees though. Then again, maybe I should have installed a brake.
👽
I kept both brakes on mine as I had no intension of learning any fixie rider tricks. I only rode it so I could ride my mountain bike better. I still think anyone who wants to work on their mtb game should get one. It put me on another level.
 

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I rode fixed for a few seasons, not all the time but off and on. I wanted to get more comfortable riding at varying cadences and I just thought it was fun. I did a century (paved, mostly) on one once just to see if I could. Once I had the rear wheel slip out of the track ends and jam against my chainstays, sprinting through a turning traffic light at nearly 30mph. That was exciting. Folded the wheel right in half. I also met a guy in the late 90's who rode trail on a fixed gear Slingshot 29er with dirtdrop bars. That was the first Slingshot, first fixie and first 29er I ever saw. Left an impression.
 

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I tend to run lower RPM. It just works better for me at a given speed. Climbing at 5 mph at low RPM seems to get me a lower HR than higher RPM at the same speed. Doesn't really make sense, though. It's the same amount of work.
 

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I tend to run lower RPM. It just works better for me at a given speed. Climbing at 5 mph at low RPM seems to get me a lower HR than higher RPM at the same speed. Doesn't really make sense, though. It's the same amount of work.


I think that's true, lower cadence means lower heartrate but on the flipside low cadence also produces more lactate acid buildup, so generally a higher cadence is better for endurance. I've seen a few studies suggesting that within reason self selected cadence is usually best.
 
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