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Spidermonkey on wheels
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought my bike in July and I have been having a mechanic check the wear of my chain seeing as I don't have a tool. I just now has gotten to 1.0% wear so I replaced the chain. The new chain bucks about once a pass when I put pressure on it. The guy at the LBS insists that my cassette is worn too bad but I think he just wants me to buy another from him. :rolleyes: What do you think/suggest?
 

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all day long
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Maybe, maybe not. It's possible that it is worn already. I have gone through chains and cogs in that short of a time (if not shorter) and I've also had chains and cogs last me for over years. If your drivetrain isn't dialed and you've got everything correctly adjusted, then that's a good sign you have something that needs replacing.

If you think your mechanic isn't being honest with you, go to another shop and go a 2nd opinion. OR as Natalie has mentioned, get the tools and do the work yourself. Personally, I prefer to do my own wrenching.
 

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Chains and cogs wear together. Depending on your riding style, components, conditions and whatnot, you can typically run 2 chains to 1 cassette. When you replace a chain on a worn cassette it might skip/ghostshift which is why a lot of mechanics replace them both at the same time.
 

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simpsonna said:
I just bought my bike in July and I have been having a mechanic check the wear of my chain seeing as I don't have a tool. I just now has gotten to 1.0% wear so I replaced the chain. The new chain bucks about once a pass when I put pressure on it. The guy at the LBS insists that my cassette is worn too bad but I think he just wants me to buy another from him. :rolleyes: What do you think/suggest?
There is a tool to check your cassette for wear too, have a mechanic do the check in front of you.
 

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How much do you ride?

I got my new bike in March, have put at least 1200 miles on it, and am having to replace the chain, rear cassette, and even the chain rings. The shop said I was long overdue on the chain and cassette and even pointed out for me where my chain rings were worn out. I was missing a tooth on the small ring, a couple of teeth on the big ring were slightly bent, and some of the indentations on the middle ring that help when shifting were clearly worn.

If you ride a lot, and especially if you ride hard and do a lot of shifting, getting 6 months out of your chain and cassette may be excellent.
 

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Derailleurless
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simpsonna said:
...I have been having a mechanic check the wear of my chain seeing as I don't have a tool.
Of course you do! It's a ruler.



Measure 12" (24 links) from the edge of a rivet. If the corresponding edge of the 25th rivet is 1/16" past the 12" mark, install a new chain (~0.5% wear).

If you get to the 12-1/8" mark (~1% wear), you're in for a new cassette, and maybe new chainrings.

For more info than you care to read, check out this thread:

https://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=215824

FWIW, the Rohloff, Park and apparently the Spin Doctor tool pictured above, all have a mojor shortcoming that renders false "worn" readings (more about that in the thread I linked to). The only go/no-go gauge I'd trust is Shimano's $60 TL-CN40, but the ruler method is going to be just as accurate.
 

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wyrd bið ful ãræd
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Why dont you take a picture of the cassette?

I have been using mine for more than 1000 miles and still going ok ...

I do tend to clean my chain quite often ... I use the SRAM power link on my Shimano chain just so that I can completely remove the chain to clean it ...

Clean chain and gear changing techniques do tend to keep cassette/chainring going a lot longer ...
 

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Two things

A new chain has packing lube on it. the lube is very sticky and thick, try cleaning this off it should help somewhat.

I get 3 to 4 chains to a cassette, Remember that a new chain will skip an an old cassette until it wears in to that cassette.

I have a chain checkker the first chain will wear fairly evenly from about .25% streach to 1 %.

The second chain will wear quickly to say .5% streach and then normally to 1% streach.

The third chain will wear quickly to say .75% streach and then normally to 1% streach.

Then it's time for a new casstte and chain.

If the cassette and chain havn't come to "agreement" the chain will tend to skip under hard pressure.
 

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simpsonna said:
I just bought my bike in July and I have been having a mechanic check the wear of my chain seeing as I don't have a tool. I just now has gotten to 1.0% wear so I replaced the chain. The new chain bucks about once a pass when I put pressure on it. The guy at the LBS insists that my cassette is worn too bad but I think he just wants me to buy another from him. :rolleyes: What do you think/suggest?
Sounds like the cassette is worn, too. The first time I replaced the chain on my bike, I had to come in a few days later for a new cassette, too, very similar to your situation. 1.0% chain wear is more than what the LBS here recommends. They say replace at 0.75%. I've got the Park tool go/no go checker that is 0.75% on one side and 1.0% on the other. I'm on the third chain for this cassette and I'll replace the cassette next season along with the chain. It is not at the 0.75% wear yet, but I assume it will be by spring. When I put the last new chain on, some gears skipped a bit and I was worried the cassette was due, too. But then I guess the new chain wore down or something and the skipping stopped. I had replaced the chain at 0.75% stretch.
It has not been that long on your chain/cassette, but sometimes things wear fast. Could be that the stock components are on the low end as far as durability. Replace with as high end as you are comfortable with without being silly (XTR...)

Another thought, check for a stiff link in the new chain. Once per revolution sounds like it could be a stiff link.
 

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If your going to ride you better know how to wrench,I spent most of my teen years wrenching on my moto cross bikes so bicycles are a breeze.The bike biz is tough and just getting tougher,you have to do a lot of repairs and sales to make it.
My call,unless you have major miles 2000 plus,you cass. is fine,you may just need a rear del.adjustment or a new chain break in period.:thumbsup:
 

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Spidermonkey on wheels
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well I was rough on it when I first got the bike but maybe the new chain just hasn't "come to an agreement" yet. I had put my old chain back on but I'll try the new one again (It's a SRAM just like my cassette by the way) and see if it gets any better. If not I'll have to break down and buy another cassette. Thanks for the help. :thumbsup: And I do prefer to do my own work that's why I came to the mechanics for help. I have to learn somehow. :rolleyes:

P.S. Any tips for removing SRAM powerlinks? I have a hard time getting them to snap back apart.
 

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wyrd bið ful ãræd
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1,725 Posts
You just need to push the 2 pins towards each other (such that the pins will move towards 'B') and they will come loose ... use WD40 to help ... and remove any soil or grime ... but before you reinstall your chain on your bike ... I use a dish washing liquid to clean the chain and dry immediately and re-grease with chain lube ...

They lock when you click them in place and pull on the chain ... if that makes any sense ...

Bicycle part Font Auto part Musical instrument accessory Bicycle accessory


to lock you need to push the pins through B which has a larger circumference then you pull on the chain such that the pin moves to A which has a smaller circumference, which is the same size as the "slot"

to unlock will be the reverse

sorry it was easier for me to explain the locking mechanism ...
 
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