Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 58 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ride a polygon siskui n7. I bought it as my first dual sus, as at the time i didn't have a whole lot to spend (bike cost $3500AUD) for what it was, it was great value machine and I thought i could just upgrade it overtime to make it how i want it as my skills progressed. Fast forward to today about 8 months later, pretty much nothing is stock on the bike and i would have spent an easy $3000 AUD ish on upgrades. Everything is top of the line, Fox x2, spank wheels etc, xt. Just a few days ago i bought a fox 38 as i didnt like my lyrik ultimate. After i bought the fork which cost $2000AUD (I know.... Sold my lyrik for $800 though to cover some costs) i started having some regrets as i could of just sold the bike and bought something "better" its just been a bit of money trap upgrading as $500 here an there doesn't seem like to much compared to a whole new bike but i could have easily have bought a "high end" bike by now with the money i have spent. But then i think i wouldnt of had the bike untill now etc.

I know at the end of the day its what i want to do and what i enjoy but i'm starting to wonder if i'm "pouring" money into a bad foundation. The bike rides awesome but i know a bike "can" ride better. Just from riding friends carbon bikes etc.

When does upgrading become completely worthless? im not expecting to get my money back when i sell the bike i just thought i could swap the parts over to another bike or i could buy a new frame and swap the parts over etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The frame is solid foundation. Honestly it tough to get truly top end parts that you like for cheap even buying complete also most of the part can probably transfer to new frame assuming the new frame has the same wheel size/axles sizes.
Yeah that is very true, i think i need to stop worrying about Cost to benefit ratio. Of course buying a high end bike at once would be a better option but i never had the money to spend in first place. The bike is a blast to ride and i think that should be the main point at the end of the day. yeah i thought i could just transfer the parts over to another frame one day but in the end it will cost me more than if i had just saved and bought the more expensive bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Part of the fun for me is building the bike the way you want. I’d be really bored buying a sworks or equivalent where all the upgrades are done already!
I do really enjoy that part as well. Seeing how new parts affect the experience is quite cool to do. Just feeling a bit sick with how much the new fox 38's cost me lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Definitely don’t do a cost benefit analysis. That would take the fun right out of it. Unless you’re chasing Olympic gold, or a big fat pay day as a pro, being able to go 3% faster will never make financial sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Buying a less expensive aluminum oem built bike and upgrading as needed is cost effective
Stock wheels at most build levels suck anyways, so that’s automatic. Just don’t go crazy on crap like stems, cranks etc.
In my opinion they don’t matter very much. Hub/Wheels, brakes, suspension and maybe a nice carbon bar.

Now, I would have had the fork custom tuned/upgraded vs buying a new stock fork.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,730 Posts
Keep all the old parts, when you have upgraded everything, buy a new frame, reassemble the old bike and sell it. I have done this multiple times over the years as have others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
I understand where you are coming from, I have a couple of Santa Cruz bike's that I keep upgrading, changing out parts just because I feel the need to try something new or different.

Sent from my moto g(7) supra using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
The bike rides awesome but i know a bike "can" ride better. Just from riding friends carbon bikes etc.
See this is your problem. Just stop ridding your friends carbon dentist bike and you’ll never know any different. ;)

I’m doing the same thing you are, although not as crazy. I bought a wheel set that cost half as much as my whole bike did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
See this is your problem. Just stop ridding your friends carbon dentist bike and you’ll never know any different. ;)

I’m doing the same thing you are, although not as crazy. I bought a wheel set that cost half as much as my whole bike did.
Haha yep, granted that bike was $9000k new..... im generally the fastest to with the least expensive bike not that it matters but shows you dont need the most expensive bike at all. I have fun so i guess that should be the main thing and i do love upgrading parts and seeing what performance i get from it. Yeah wheels are a given by the sounds of it so you made the right choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I do the same thing. Upgrade an alloy frame. I’ve done it now to a Ripmo AF, YT Tues, and Meta Am 29. I don’t have any regrets. I have ridden Yetis and dont feel like I am missing out. But truthfully I probably will go carbon frame when Im over 40 just because I feel like it dampens the impacts on the body more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
829 Posts
It's not black and white I guess. Most cost effective is to buy the bike/spec you need as a complete, don't change a thing and sell it when the time comes to fund the next purchase.

Least cost effective is buying a bike you don't like the specs of and start upgrading immediately.

Generally if you keep a bike a while things get worn or damaged and that's a chance to replace said part wth something of better quality. For me it's key not to go over the top and make reasonable and functional choices. If you simply want extra bling just admit it to yourself and keep in mind that it may not improve your riding or how the bike feels. But it's your bike, your cash and you don't have to justify all this to anyone but yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
If your frame serves your needs then it's never a problem putting parts on it that will benefit your riding.

I do think a lot of people buy expensive new forks or shocks because XXX shock or fork is "higher end" than what they have. But if you don't understand the deficiencies in your current suspension setup then you don't know if whatever new shock/fork can overcome those deficiencies. An anecdote that illustrates this is a local rider who "upgraded" his Fox 34 Performance to a Fox 36 Factory because the 36 Factory is a "better" fork. He didn't push the bike that hard so chassis flex was never an issue. The 34 was set up great for him the Fit Grip damper worked well for the riding he did. Once he got the Grip2 damper he didn't understand all of the adjustments and never got the fork dialed in to ride as good as his old Fox 34. I see people replace Rockshox rear shocks all the time for a Fox shock and say how the fox shock performs better, but can't really say what was wrong with the stock Rockshox and what actually performs better on the Fox replacement. In these instances I would say the upgrades are a waste of money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I upgraded all my bikes to fox factory way cheaper than buying the full bike already with fox factory. I think most fox factory spec builds are over priced especially if you sell off the oem suspension.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
724 Posts
In one sense, you are right. Upgrades in general are more expensive post bike purchase vs buying the bike with the best components level you can afford brand new since manufacturers get bulk discounts. To get an X2 optioned on your new bike, is only going to cost a fraction of it retails around $600-$700.

Even then, any upgrades that puts a smile on your face has got to be worth something.
It’s only “not worth it” when you stop riding, then all that upgrades sit and collect dust.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
I need glasses.
Joined
·
48 Posts
It depends. With Shimano SLX and even Deore are great. You can upgrade to an XT trigger and get the double upshift and fast release features. I got new OEM XT cranks from Germany pretty cheap and dropped an LB off the bike over the Deore cranks for around $200. There are lots of OEM Shimano parts around the world for short money because the frames and parts are poorly distributed. If you can wait weeks for a part then you can do OK.

You can turn a Rockshox Reba into a last generation Sid with Charger damper and Debonair for pretty short money.

If you understand what you're getting into with used parts you can do well there. It's weird but I've found people selling high end parts usually change or upgrade with little or no wear on them. I just bought a basically new XTR cassette for around $250.

You can go from Deore single piston calipers to Deore double pistons for short money. A bigger rotor is cheap and Chinese ones are generally fine. It's not magic, it's just a flat piece of round metal.

Tires and touch points are always worth thinking about.

You can upgrade strategically and it's worth it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,730 Posts
I do think a lot of people buy expensive new forks or shocks because XXX shock or fork is "higher end" than what they have. But if you don't understand the deficiencies in your current suspension setup then you don't know if whatever new shock/fork can overcome those deficiencies. An anecdote that illustrates this is a local rider who "upgraded" his Fox 34 Performance to a Fox 36 Factory because the 36 Factory is a "better" fork. He didn't push the bike that hard so chassis flex was never an issue. The 34 was set up great for him the Fit Grip damper worked well for the riding he did. Once he got the Grip2 damper he didn't understand all of the adjustments and never got the fork dialed in to ride as good as his old Fox 34. I see people replace Rockshox rear shocks all the time for a Fox shock and say how the fox shock performs better, but can't really say what was wrong with the stock Rockshox and what actually performs better on the Fox replacement. In these instances I would say the upgrades are a waste of money.
I think many riders believe that equipment will make them better, when their efforts would be far better spent on dialing in the setup they have and practicing skills and/or paying for some coaching. I have watched a friend's riding buddy spend literally tens of thousands of dollars jumping bikes, which he refuses to allow any adjustment to the setup (my friend is 230 pounds, this guy about 170, and my friend says the suspension is so stiff, he only gets about 1/2 travel when he tried his riding buddy's bike). No amount of money will fix poor setup and a lack of riding skills.

I am not a big fan of Fox stuff, but I am absolutely floored with how well the Rhythm 34 fork that came on my Son's Ibis DV9 works. Does it have the adjustability and plushness of the Mattoc Pro on my hardtail? Nope. Is it 95% as good with only needing to add air, set the low speed open, and set the rebound. Yes. For riders that aren't willing to spend time methodically going through setup, it is likely better than a more adjustable fork. All that said, none of this changes the fact that my son smokes my ass on every downhill, even when I am on my FS trail bike and him on his hardtail.
 
1 - 20 of 58 Posts
Top