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renaissance cyclist
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309 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this in tool time before realizing that this might be a more appropriate forum:

I recently bought a Jamis Dakar XC. So far, I love it other than the constant chattering of the derailed banging against the chain stay. At first I thought about trying to move the derailer to a position where it won’t be so close to the oddly shaped chain stay of my bike. When I looked at the picture on the Jamis website, however, the Derailer sits very close to the chain stay on that bike too. I’m a little hesitant to change things because the bike really does shift beautifully and I don’t want to mess that up. I’ve had other full suspension bikes and although the derailer did hit at times, but this is totally different. Should I just learn to live with the chattering sound when I ride down a bumpy trail, or will this eventually ruin my derailer? http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/thebik...karxc_sl.html#
 

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Meh.
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17,508 Posts
Zip-tie a small rubber bumper to the knuckle of the derailleur.

You may also want to use a chainstay wrap to protect the frame from chainslap.

You can try to dial in the b-limit screw a bit... but don't overdo it.
 

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Vaginatarian
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5,685 Posts
if its the deraillier and not just the chain, switch to a shadow deraillier. they dont have that pivot so they cant hit
 

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1,498 Posts
debusama said:
I

So far, I love it other than the constant chattering of the derailed banging against the chain stay.
Experiment with chain tension, (without cutting the chain) by leading it off the chainrings and test whether shortening or lengthening the chain moves the derailleur down and back enough to make a difference, Also, try adjusting the derailleur postioning screw to bring the derailleur back.

If shortening the chain seems to help, be sure that you don't cut it too short. It needs to run on the large front/largest rear rear combination without damaging the derailleur. Even if you plan never to run this crossed over combination, you need to provide for it in case of an accidental mis-shift.

On some derailleurs, there is a means to adjust the idler cage tension, either by a tension screw, or multiple positions for the spring leg on the cage. Sometimes changing this moves the derailleur down and back.

If all else fails, and you're willing to live with it, improvise a bumper with some scrap neoprene or soft PVC taped in the appropriate location under the chainstay with a few turns of electrical tape. It isn't elegant, but will protect both the frame and the derailleur, and also make for a quieter bump. Good luck.
 
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