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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,

My daughter's bike was in storage for five years, while she was away. This Yeti 575 bike was bought new in 2010, and she probably rode it twice before leaving.

Now she's back, and the shock will just not work -- the controlled rebound is broken. It will compress normally, but then it rebounds uncontrollably.

So the bottom line is: is it normal that a shock will not last unused in storage?
 

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That's not normal. Cycle it a few times by riding around the block bouncing up and down on the rear suspension. Add rebound after this and ride it around the block again to see if it slows down the rebound at all. If it doesn't, it might be time for a complete rebuild.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks you for reading and replying. I already did. Then took it to my trusted LBS and Yeti dealer. Shock is broken.
 

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The joy of ski is Yours
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Thanks you for reading and replying. I already did. Then took it to my trusted LBS and Yeti dealer. Shock is broken.
Compression and Rebound are both paths within the cycling of the total Oil volume - there are rubber parts which need to remain bathed, part the design is with the slight swelling oil-to-rubber (o-ring) provide.

Likely something is deteriorated and has clogged the passages for oil. If you daughters car has been sitting for the past 5 years also with this Yeti - check the tires for cracks, de-varnish the gasoline, checks for mice or a banana in the tailpipe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So is it normal for Fox shocks to deteriorate to the point of them needing replacement just by not using the bike??? :confused::confused:
 

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Yes it's normal. It's a tiny can with 500psi of pressure in it, with cheesy rubber seals holding it all together. One tiny little slip of pressure means the damper malfunctions.

It's amazing they last as long as they do, really.

It's not broken either, it just needs service.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes it's normal. It's a tiny can with 500psi of pressure in it, with cheesy rubber seals holding it all together. One tiny little slip of pressure means the damper malfunctions.

It's amazing they last as long as they do, really.

It's not broken either, it just needs service.
So how do you go about replacing a shock for an older frame, when the exact same shock is not manufactured any more?
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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If you let your car sit for a decade and then started it up, you'd have the same problems, especially with things that are sealed and pressurized, like shocks, but with any rubber part. These are meant to be lubricated through use, so if you stop using them, it dries them out, they degrade, pressure leaks out, oil mixes with air, damping is lost, sometimes dissimilar parts corrode. This can also happen with use, but most complex parts like this are not designed to "sit on the shelf" that long and then go, they likely need at least a service and probably some new seals.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok. Thanks for all your comments. I guess I will get a new shock for her bike. I'm mechanically inclined and will try to change it myself --- I assume I can do it with my Park Tool starter's kit?

My most important concern/ question: how do I know which replacement shock I should get? The one that came with the bike is not made anymore. Besides the obvious of having the right measurements, how do I select a new shock that is compatible with the frame's geometry and the manufacturer's original design and intentions?

Thanks!!
 

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The shock is not broken, the replaceable parts just need to be replaced and the internals cleaned out. You don't need a new shock, you just need a bike shop to do a rebuild. Shouldn't be that expensive to perform.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The shock is not broken, the replaceable parts just need to be replaced and the internals cleaned out. You don't need a new shock, you just need a bike shop to do a rebuild. Shouldn't be that expensive to perform.
Thanks for your reply. Unfortunately, I'm not located in the US. The local Fox dealer tells me they can't (or won't) overhaul that shock. So I have 3 choices:
a) Take it with me to the US in one of my trips, and personally send it to be serviced (where do I send it and how long does it take?)
b) Have the local Fox dealer send it to the US to have it serviced, but by the time I pay all the shipping and overhead, probably option (c) is less expensive.
c) Buy a new one.

I'm inclined for going (a) or (c). If I go (c), how do I go about selecting a replacement, compatible but better (?) shock?

I think I'm going to enjoy this bike mechanic thing. Please, you're comments are more than welcome.
 

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You need to know the eye-to-eye and stroke of your shock to get one that fits and you need to have some idea of the leverage ratio (rear wheel travel divided by shock stroke) of the frame to get the correct damping tune.



I'd guess that a Fox CTD or DPS, Rockshox Monarch or Manitou McLeod built in the last few years will be better than a 2010 RP23, just avoid the "Evolution" level Fox stuff.
 

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Three of the more well known places that could replace the internals for a good price would be Push, Avalanche, and Vorsprung.
 

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How much do you plan in spending for a new shock?

I've shipped bikes across the world for $70, I assume sending a shock to the US for a repair would be relatively inexpensive. Push or Avalanche can custom tune your existing shock and have it back and better than ever.

And no, fox shocks don't normally have issues after sitting for a while. I've had quite a few and never have failed like that. Does your rebound knob turn? I have had those seize before and a little chain oil and small rotations get em working right in no time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Three of the more well known places that could replace the internals for a good price would be Push, Avalanche, and Vorsprung.
Thank you so much for the info.

And no, fox shocks don't normally have issues after sitting for a while. I've had quite a few and never have failed like that. Does your rebound knob turn? I have had those seize before and a little chain oil and small rotations get em working right in no time.
Thank you for your feedback. So maybe/hopefully this an isolated incident? I was planning on spending about $250-300. Does that sound right? How much would a professional overhaul from the shops mentioned run for?
 

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In case it's not clear, the IFP nitrogen leaked out. He needs a few bucks in seals, oil, and a nitrogen (or just air) charge.

You should expect to have to service your IFP at least once in 5 years. Once a year is totally acceptable. Most shocks can be serviced at home now because that IFP chamber just isn't going to stay charged forever.

I believe more people are riding around on leaked out shocks than we realize.
 

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Where are you located OP? Any motorbike shop that does suspension can work on bike suspension. Having them want to work on bike suspension can be another matter!

Most countries worldwide have independent bike suspension centres (like mine) who will do this work.
 

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I believe more people are riding around on leaked out shocks than we realize.
Oh you'd love to see the stuff we get rolling in the door!

No gas pressure.
No oil.
Broken shims or lockout plates that get crunched inside.
Seals and o-rings that turn to crumbling goo.
A box of oily parts with a note asking if we can please re-assemble?

Slurpy shocks are as routine as it gets.
 
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