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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I just purchased a set of Mavic Crossmax ST wheels and have read that they are prone to having spokes pop out. I have read that it is recommended to increase the tension on the spokes by a 1/2 turn. Is there a certain pattern that should be followed while doing this? The rear rim has straight lacing on one side and a cross pattern on the other while the front rim is all straight lace. I dont want to get these things out of alignment. Any help is appreciated.
 

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If you go through....

and start at a given point, say at the valve stem hole, and add exactly 1/2 turn to each spoke around the wheel in sucession you shouldn't have any problems. If you are not comfortable with doing this, take the wheels to an LBS and have them do it.

Good Dirt
 

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~Disc~Golf~
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remember too, that when you are tightening the nipples, it's not the standard 'righty-tighty / lefty-loosey' as you look toward the inside of the rim - It will seem backwards as the 'nut' (nipple) is actually driven from the outside of the rim.

Also, do one side at a time.(every other nipple)
And 'over drive' the nipple say by a quarter turn then back off by a quarter (1/2 turn+1/4 turn-1/4 turn=1/2 turn) - this helps eliminate any spoke twist.

Excellent Soil
 

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highdelll said:
remember too, that when you are tightening the nipples, it's not the standard 'righty-tighty / lefty-loosey' as you look toward the inside of the rim ...
It is when I am working on wheels. With the wheel in the truing stand the nipple end of the spoke I am working on points at me. Turning the wrench to the right tightens it,
 

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shiggy said:
It is when I am working on wheels. With the wheel in the truing stand the nipple end of the spoke I am working on points at me. Turning the wrench to the right tightens it,
right, I was just pointing out something that's easy to brain-fart on - especially when first learning to true/ tighten spokes - if you happen to be looking in that direction.

I agree, that having the outside of the rim facing you is the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for the responses. I would have messed this up. I was thinking that I would have to tighten every spoke 180 degrees out to keep the hub centered. I also was unaware of the thread direction and to overtighten than back off on the nipple an extra 1/4 turn. Thank you!
 

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FireLikeIYA said:
I also was unaware of the thread direction and to overtighten than back off on the nipple an extra 1/4 turn.
What he meant by that was a way of preventing/removing spoke windup where the spoke partially twists instead of the nipple turning on its threads due to friction. The thinner the spoke, the greater the chance of windup. Some spokes - 14g plain gauge - twist very little. Others - like DT Revolution - twist a lot.

Some of us never use this "turn further & back off a bit" method of removing windup. We prefer to use other techniques to remove it after it has occurred. Or maybe it never occurred in the first place and I don't want to back off a nipple that doesn't need it!

You mentioned that "I would have messed this up". You really should read up on wheelbuilding before you put wrench to spoke. The finest source of this info is Roger Musson's wheelbuilding e-book. Many tips are in my wheelbuilding info in my sig.
 

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meh....
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Also watch the dish when doing this. For the rear I'd 1/2 turn on the drive side spokes only first, then check the dish, it might be pulled toward the drive side a little. Go 1/4 turn on the non-drive side spokes first time around, check the dish.
 

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Mike T. said:
...Some of us never use this "turn further & back off a bit" method of removing windup. We prefer to use other techniques to remove it after it has occurred. Or maybe it never occurred in the first place and I don't want to back off a nipple that doesn't need it!...
I've found that wheels that have been sittin for a bit especially benefit from this - maybe tho it is all in my head.
It may be a waste of time, but it doesn't 'hurt' anyways :thumbsup:
(It's still good to do all the spoke tension/twist release methods too - grabbing pairs, rim/hub flexin etc)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Monte said:
Also watch the dish when doing this. For the rear I'd 1/2 turn on the drive side spokes only first, then check the dish, it might be pulled toward the drive side a little. Go 1/4 turn on the non-drive side spokes first time around, check the dish.
Is this due to the rear wheel having cross lacing on one side and zero lacing on the other?
 

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FireLikeIYA said:
Is this due to the rear wheel having cross lacing on one side and zero lacing on the other?
No, it's because of the dish, or spoke angle. Look at the spokes on the drive side and non-drive side, they are at different angles because of the cassette. The drive side spokes are going almost straight up so to speak from the flange to the rim. The non-drive side have more of an angle. Because of that angle they can pull the rim over way easier than the drive side spokes can.

So basically if you are going to tighten all of your rear spokes 1/2 turn, the non-drive side rear spokes will pull the rim over toward that side and your rim will not be centered. What I would do is tighten the drive side spokes the 1/2 turn you want, then do the non-drive side 1/4 turn and check that the rim is centered. If it's too far, loosen the non-drive side a little. If it wasn't enough, tighten the non-drive side some more.
 

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give me two chickens and half a goat and I'll do it for you



...



plus your daughter....







NO!!.,.





not the ugly one - sheesh!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Monte said:
No, it's because of the dish, or spoke angle. Look at the spokes on the drive side and non-drive side, they are at different angles because of the cassette. The drive side spokes are going almost straight up so to speak from the flange to the rim. The non-drive side have more of an angle. Because of that angle they can pull the rim over way easier than the drive side spokes can.

So basically if you are going to tighten all of your rear spokes 1/2 turn, the non-drive side rear spokes will pull the rim over toward that side and your rim will not be centered. What I would do is tighten the drive side spokes the 1/2 turn you want, then do the non-drive side 1/4 turn and check that the rim is centered. If it's too far, loosen the non-drive side a little. If it wasn't enough, tighten the non-drive side some more.
Great! Thanks for the response.
 
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