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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A bunch of my friends want to start trail riding together and progressively work into harder and harder stuff. I am not sure the year but I have a well taken care of Klein Pulse Comp. I ride it on some easy trails but haven't done anything actually hard. Is it capable of keeping up with modern day mountain bikes? They used to retail over a $1000, so I figure it should be decent. Should I upgrade anything on it? If so, what? I don't have squat for money right now so I can't really buy a modern bike or I would. What's the difficulty of trails this bike could handle?
 

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It could handle whatever you can. Rider 90% bike 10% . I did a ride last year with my bike from 88 ,I was ahead of my friend on the uphills and down. He was on a new bike,
 

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Klein Pulse Comp is a great starter MTB. With all the modern-day parts - it still has the potential to be quite a fairly lightweight trail beast.
 
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Yeah.. bikes have gotten better, sure.. Technology is great.. But it's not the bike that's going to prevent you from riding it. Don't upgrade unless something isn't working for you. People always ask what should they upgrade... If you have to upgrade, you already know what.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the responses everyone. I appreciate it! I don't really know what to upgrade though haha. I am kind of a noob to what is a good component and a bad component.
 

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Thanks for all the responses everyone. I appreciate it! I don't really know what to upgrade though haha. I am kind of a noob to what is a good component and a bad component.
Given that you've said money is tight... if everything is in working order, then I wouldn't do any upgrades. Replace/update as things break.

If you have a little bit of cash and you absolutely must upgrade something, you will often get the most 'bang for your buck' by upgrading your wheelset (but good wheelsets aren't inexpensive). If you are on a super tight budget, you could always add some cheap "bling" with colored/anondized accent-type items (seatpost clamp, grips, handlebars, colored skewers, etc). If you are using the stock pedals, a nice upgrade would be a new set of pedals (either clipless or a nice flat with pins and some 5.10s or skate type shoes).

You could also spend some money on upgrading accessories - new helmet, maybe a camelback, some new gloves, some new bicycle shorts, cyclometer to track your mileage, etc.

Sometimes when I get an "itch" to upgrade, just something small and inexpensive will quench the need (at least temporarily, lol).
 

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Our son still has a 2001 Schwinn Moab that he has taken on trails all over Orange County. A year ago he took it to Snow Summit. He is the first to say that the bike isn't the right one for going down ski runs, but he used it anyway. He would like to upgrade to a new bike, but with working a lot of odd hours, he doesn't ride as much. When he does he takes out the old Schwinn.

The only parts that have been changed are derailleurs and the shifters. I think your Klein will be fine for what you are doing.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you have a little bit of cash and you absolutely must upgrade something, you will often get the most 'bang for your buck' by upgrading your wheelset (but good wheelsets aren't inexpensive). If you are on a super tight budget, you could always add some cheap "bling" with colored/anondized accent-type items (seatpost clamp, grips, handlebars, colored skewers, etc). If you are using the stock pedals, a nice upgrade would be a new set of pedals (either clipless or a nice flat with pins and some 5.10s or skate type shoes).
I mean, money is tight to the point where I can't go spend a grand on a new bike. Although I would like to make this bike more mountain comfortable if possible. But I do need a new wheel set. Do you have any recommendations? The current tires on it are pretty warped and oxidized. And I'll probably get new pedals. The ones on it now have stupid straps that seem so flawed to me.
 

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If your game plan is to ride this and then get a new bike, I would fix it and ride it into the ground. Even if you got new wheels, you might want a new bike with different size wheels so you won't be able to even carry them over. Why not straighten out the wheels you have and ride those, and start a bike fund with the money you save. All wheels need to be tuned, new and old.. No reason to throw them out.

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Some good stuff here. You can normally remove the strap and toe clips from most pedals. Take a close look at yours and see.

Does the Klien have a suspension fork or rigid?

Have the wheels tried up. If the tires are dry rotted. You can mail order tires for $25 a piece all over the internet. Grab some grips if they are dry rotted while your at it.

The spend money on comfort stuff is a great idea. Helmet, shorts, hydration pack.

A spare tube, pump, co2, multi tool is nice to have.

Focus more on riding. As you get into better shape. You can start thinking about upgrades or a new bike.

Btw..... Always drooled over Klien frames in the '90s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Some good stuff here. You can normally remove the strap and toe clips from most pedals. Take a close look at yours and see.

Does the Klien have a suspension fork or rigid?

Have the wheels tried up. If the tires are dry rotted. You can mail order tires for $25 a piece all over the internet. Grab some grips if they are dry rotted while your at it.

The spend money on comfort stuff is a great idea. Helmet, shorts, hydration pack.

A spare tube, pump, co2, multi tool is nice to have.

Focus more on riding. As you get into better shape. You can start thinking about upgrades or a new bike.

Btw..... Always drooled over Klien frames in the '90s.
Yeah, it looks like the toe straps are removable.

It has a Rock Shox suspension fork.

The bike is pretty pristine and also pre trek, I know that much. But I will need new tires and maybe grips. And have most of that other gear.
 

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Why do you think you need new wheels? You can get tires alone. And tires often have cosmetic problems due to age that don't really affect function. I think if the bike landed in my lap, I'd just air 'em up and go before planning to spend any money.

Purpose-built platform pedals are much better than the ones designed to work with clips and straps. I picked up a set for $10 the other day - you really don't have to spend much to see a big improvement. More expensive ones can have some nicer aspects, so it depends some on what you're comfortable spending.

If your grips are twisting, locking grips are a big improvement. That's another part that I usually don't touch until it's worn out or I manage to tear them or something.
 

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I think if the bike landed in my lap, I'd just air 'em up and go before planning to spend any money.
Andrew's got the right idea. IMHO, buy a new helmet. Maybe some tires as I know from experience they can become brittle. But, you are close to ready to go and should not feel a bit outclassed by riders with newer bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Andrew's got the right idea. IMHO, buy a new helmet. Maybe some tires as I know from experience they can become brittle. But, you are close to ready to go and should not feel a bit outclassed by riders with newer bikes.
Definitely a new helmet is on the list. Yeah, I'm just worried about full suspension guys showing me up. But hey, I'll learn a lot riding a hard tail. And I will for sure post picture of the bike in the morning for those of you who want to see it!
 

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I bought a FS last year. It's that year's Kona Hei Hei DL. That's one step down from Kona's take on the fastest possible XC bike. I like the bike a lot, and it is faster than my '07 Specialized Hardrock. But only a little bit. It doesn't make as much of a difference as my fitness, or practicing certain trails that give me trouble. To be fair, I've upgradeitised that bike. Maybe to the level of your Klein.

When I go on lunch rides at work, I still use my hardtail. I leave it at work now. I don't like my Kona enough better to shuttle it back and forth. The fastest two guys in our group are on a long-travel 26" FS and a short-travel 26" hardtail respectively.

I may "fork" my Hardrock. It has an aging 80 mm Marzocchi right now. I don't expect it to change where I fit in with my coworkers that much. My times in that spot aren't that different when I ride my Hei Hei there.
 

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I have only recently started mountain biking, long time roadie, and my advice is to make sure that the bike shifts when you want it to and stops when you want it to and has the right tires for where you are riding and then go ride.

Since you have had it on easy trails, you should know how solid the bike is and how smooth it rides. If you don't want other guys on FS bikes from showing you up, make sure your not riding along with a clickity-clack because things are not adjusted or squealing down the mountain because your brakes are old or not setup properly.

On a long term basis, learn to work on your bike. It was quite a shock, coming from a road bike how much more attention you have to give to a mountain bike. Just the cleaning alone is night and day.

John
 

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Fs bikes have their place, as do ht. Buying an fs isn't the natural progression of mountain biking or anything. If I ever did buy an fs I would certainly keep my ht. Anyways, don't worry about what you think others are thinking lol

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