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Discussion Starter #1
My LBS doesn't want to cut my steerer tube of my XC fork, they said "not advisable". I wanted my HB to at least level with my seat for better climbing and control but I don't want those spacers piling up high over my stem. What do you all think about this?
 

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Im confused

But then again, I usually am. If I'm reading your post correctly, you have a few spacers under your stem, and would like to remove some (or all) of them and then cut the steerer tube. The end result will be a lowering of the front end of the bike so that the handlebars are somewhat level with your seat. Is this the scenario you describe?

If this is correct, then I don't know wht the LBS said not to cut the steerer tube. So long as there is plenty of tube up into the stem to facilitiate clamping, there shouldn't be a problem. If you remove the spacers and DON'T cut the steerer tube, it will likely protrued up through the stem and you won't be able to put the headset top cap on.

Perhaps there was some miscommunication between you and the LBS. perhaps I've misread your post. It's one or the other. Which one is it?
 

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prime said:
My LBS doesn't want to cut my steerer tube of my XC fork, they said "not advisable". I wanted my HB to at least level with my seat for better climbing and control but I don't want those spacers piling up high over my stem. What do you all think about this?
I've always cut mine if they were too long and never had a problem. Usually I'll leave enough to throw one small spacer in there, but that's it. Just make sure that you get a nice, straight cut. The only issue I could see is if you wanted to put the fork on another frame in the future, and the steerer tube might be too short.
 

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Just a guess - but I think what they were trying to say was try it in that position using spacers to fill the gap above the stem before you cut it. Once it's cut there is no going back.
 

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No it's not wrong to cut the steerer tube to the....

length that you want or need. But, as a previous poster stated, once it's cut there is no going back. So what I think is being recommended here is that you try it first. You can always remove spacers from under the stem and place them on top of the stem. This moves the handle bars to a different height without permanently altering the steerer tube. You can then try the new handle bar position without making the change permanent. If it turns out that the change doesn't work for you, you can change it again, go a little taller or shorter and see what works best. Then once you have your bar height set the way you want it, you can cut the steerer and make it permanent if you want. But to just cut the steerer without testing through spacer arangement can lead to problems if it turns out that you need your bar a little higher than what you initially thought.

Anyway, I would recommend that you do some spacer shuffling before you make any permanent changes. It might save some grief. Perhaps that is what your LBS was trying to convey to you and you misunderstood or they communicated it poorly. If not then it's time to find a new LBS, cause they are full of shite! At least on the matter of cutting steerer tubes! :D

Good Dirt
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you and therefore I could insist to cut it.

oddestfellow said:
I've always cut mine if they were too long and never had a problem. Usually I'll leave enough to throw one small spacer in there, but that's it. Just make sure that you get a nice, straight cut. The only issue I could see is if you wanted to put the fork on another frame in the future, and the steerer tube might be too short.
Your reply now gave me confidence to insist from my lbs to cut my steerer tube or I will cut it myself instead. Thank you.
 

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Listen to Squash and ssingga.

How do you know where you want the bars? Is this a new bike? Do you have exact geometry/ measurements/handling in mind?

We are not saying "do not cut the steer tube." We are, however, saying "wait, be sure that you want to do that, and where."

If this is a new bike, leave the steer alone for now. Play around with flopping the stem, and the spacers for a while. Be sure that you know EXACTLY what you are trying to do, prior to making the cut. There is NO GOING BACK.
 

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MattSavage
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Absolutely do not cut it yourself. You'll just fudge it up. Unless you have a saw guide.
 

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I've always trimmed the steer tube myself. It's really easy to do.

I prefer using a pipe cutter rather than a saw because it is easy to get a square cut with a pipe cutter. The only drawback is that the blade does "bulge" the edge some so you need to file it down in order for the stem to fit over the steer tube. It's no big deal since you need to deburr the freshly cut edge with a file anyways. If you increase the pressure on the cutter very gradually you'll get less of a bulge. Do becareful and take your time while rotating the cutter because sometimes it can "wander off" the cut to become a spiral.

If you want to use a hack saw, put a circle of masking tape around the steer tube and use that as a visual guide so you can get a straight cut.

Make sure the steer tube is 1/8" below the top of the stem (or the top spacer if you have spacers on top). If the steer tube is flush or longer than the top of the stem or spacer you will not be able to set the stem and headset to the right tension before you tighten the stem bolts.

And like everyone said, don't cut the steer tube until you are sure of the height you want.
 

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We don need no steenking saw guide...

mattsavage said:
Absolutely do not cut it yourself. You'll just fudge it up. Unless you have a saw guide.
I've always used a pipe/tubing cutter to scribe a line where I want the finished cut to be and cut with a hacksaw about 1/16 above that line. I then used a bench grinder to finish down to the scribed line. Afterwards I clean up the burrs with a dremel tool and file and finally emery cloth.

On the last steer tube I cut, I intentionally left room for about 3/4" of extra spacers. After I found my desired ride height I lopped a little more off the steer tube to eliminate spacers above the stem.
 

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mattsavage said:
Absolutely do not cut it yourself. You'll just fudge it up. Unless you have a saw guide.
I agree the guide is ideal, but if you cut slowly and pay attention to what you are doing there is no problem using masking tape or a pipe cutter.

Also, you can use an old stem for a guide if you have trouble cutting a straight line.

Like the other guy said, deburr the inside of the steerer when you are done - chainsaw file works fine. Also make sure to chamfer the outside edge of the cut and you are set.
 

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carpe mañana
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I've always used heavy duty pipe cutters and they work like a charm. Deburr the inside of the tube with the attachment on the cutter then take a file and deburr the otuside. Cuts better than the saw.

_MK
 

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I absolutely love my park saw guide.

It guarantees a straight cut, and, should it be necessary,
it can be used to cut only millimeters of the steerer tube length
if it needs to be shortened (that would be hard to do with a pipe cutter).

Very cool tool.
 

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"El Whatever"
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prime said:
My LBS doesn't want to cut my steerer tube of my XC fork, they said "not advisable". I wanted my HB to at least level with my seat for better climbing and control but I don't want those spacers piling up high over my stem. What do you all think about this?
It's only not advisable when it's cut too short..... :D

Serioulsy, measure the height of the headset, head tube and stem and add to it like 1.5 inches... use spacers as needed until you find comfortable with the bike (read: fit of the handlebars as recommended before) and then trim as necessary.

All of us ride with the steerer cut short to our proper lenght... but only after being sure where we want the handlebar at.
 

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Do it......

But be aware that even though it wont affect your current set up... it might affect you if you decide to sell it or move it to another bike, cause it miht not fit it.
It happened to me once with a marzocchi that didnt fit the buyers bike cause he had a very long-o head tube.
It wont affect you in any other way in fact it will look better and it will also be safer.. i dont think that you`ll be happy if you bang into that thing on a crash.
 
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