Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi people,
I would love some advice on what to do with my bike. I bought a 2013 trek superfly comp carbon with upgrades. This is my first mountain bike and was just hoping to use it to get into the sport.
I'm new to bike tech and what can be upgraded and what can't. Realizing this bike is a bit long in the tooth, I'm needing to replace a couple parts.
Namely the rear shifter, the rear brake, and fork.
Whoever had this bike before me replaced the drivetrain with sram 1x11 xx1, avid brakes, and a fox f29 32 with 110 mm of travel. Note that it seems all of these upgrades are from or around the year of the bike. So kinda old.
So, the questions are many. Is the bike worth putting money into to replace a bunch of expensive parts, or should I sell as is.
Also, can newer xx1, x01, or lower even be put on the bike?
What fork would be best on this bike?

Whew. I know this is a lot, but I would love to hear what you all think.

Thanks in advance.
 

·
monster member
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
It's going to be a question of passion. Are you one to get familiar with something, feel like it's "your baby" and keep it going? Or do you like to have the latest?

I had a 2001 bike that I loved until both ends of suspension died during a 35F ride around 2017. Because some nuts and bolts were rusty, I had just bought some titanium nyloc nuts and bolts with blue-anodized aluminum washers to dress it up but when the suspension died, it just didn't seem worth it to replace everything. I was curious about bigger-wheel bikes, and you can't just walk up to that... had to get a new bike. Spent $5k on a 29'er and not sure about it... maybe should'a gotten a 27.5'er. I still have that '01 26'er and still think about getting new suspension for it. (Like $1300 probably.)

No one can answer your question for you. YOu have to try out some bikes or think about the likes/dislikes of your old bike.
 

·
well mannered lout
Joined
·
3,100 Posts
A 2nd hand Superfly is an excellent choice for a first bike, so well done there.

Have you confirmed that you need to replace parts or can a lot of it be done by servicing the brakes and fork? If you're lucky you could have the bike freshened up for $300 or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A 2nd hand Superfly is an excellent choice for a first bike, so well done there.

Have you confirmed that you need to replace parts or can a lot of it be done by servicing the brakes and fork? If you're lucky you could have the bike freshened up for $300 or so.
I took it to the lbs and they told me the sram avid brakes were prone to issues and mine were exhibiting these certain issues.
The forks have kind of a shiny spot low on the station that apparently means that the seals or something have gone bad and it could fail/ collapse on any ride.
And the shifter, well, it's not shifting great. They took the shifter apart and tried to get it working better, but couldn't get it any better.

So, this is the info I'm working from.

Part of my issue is I dropped 1k on the bike just last fall. So it's all fairly recent.
I feel like that was a pretty decent price.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,847 Posts
Part of my issue is I dropped 1k on the bike just last fall. So it's all fairly recent.
If you see yourself being a sort of cross-country kind of rider, this has nice bones.

I think if you go with used stuff, you'd be okay, but if you are going to hire-out all the work and buy new parts, I think you'd be better off selling it.

Maybe go over to the pinkbike buy/sell page and see what you can find for a SRAM 11-speed shifter (GX or better), a decent fork with a tapered steerer (Edit: that uses whatever kind of front axle you have already), and some shimano brakes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: stripes

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
For the average riders, most upgrades by going to the next level up the chain of the product line, XTR vs SLX , or Pike fork over Sektor and so on, they are minimial on the performance gains but 200% on their inner demand. That being said, I've started seriously biking on a 2012 Cannondale Jekyll 26" wheels. (upgraded everything then sold it) . Then replaced it with a 27.5 2016 Capra PRO (was top spec for that time) which I've upgraded a few parts , rode it for a few years then sold it in 2019. Bought a DH bike and recently I've purchased a trail bike on 29 inch wheels. While upgrading on some certain parts helps the difference between the bikes based on geometry and different wheel size is increadible, even if they don't fall in the same ridding purpose. I would say, if something is broken, you can change it, otherwise, keep it as backup bike and hold money for a newer bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
My recommendation would be to get a second opinion on the fork. I've never heard that a worn out seal means the fork is prone to sudden catastrophic failure. You can find a replacement shifter and brake for very little money. It's aftermarket forks that are high dollar items, even used, so that's what I'd base the decision on.

If you can sort the fork with a service and overhaul kit, keep the bike and get the shifter and brake. If not, well, that's a hard choice. Factor in that you will probably have to take a pretty big loss when selling it (personally I would not want to pay $1000 for a bike that needs a new fork right off the bat).
 

·
well mannered lout
Joined
·
3,100 Posts
My recommendation would be to get a second opinion on the fork. I've never heard that a worn out seal means the fork is prone to sudden catastrophic failure. You can find a replacement shifter and brake for very little money. It's aftermarket forks that are high dollar items, even used, so that's what I'd base the decision on.

If you can sort the fork with a service and overhaul kit, keep the bike and get the shifter and brake. If not, well, that's a hard choice. Factor in that you will probably have to take a pretty big loss when selling it (personally I would not want to pay $1000 for a bike that needs a new fork right off the bat).
Sounds to me like it’s worn to the point it’s taking the finish off the stanchions. I understand why a shop wouldn’t want to gamble with a repair that might not work. I’m interested to see a picture of what’s going on with it .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,812 Posts
I ride older bikes and don't see any reason yet to get something new. However you reach a point where it isn't worth spending money to keep it going. When that happens I dump the old bike and buy a new one.
 

·
furker
Joined
·
200 Posts
This is a conundrum. It is a nice ride that in normal times an experienced home mechanic could whip into shape, and it would work great as a blue/green trail bike.

The fork is the wildcard. Burnished (shiny) stanchions can be a sign dry seals are rubbing, where there isn't any lube between the rubber and the metal. It doesn't automatically mean you need a new fork. It might be rebuildable. But dry seals mean the rest of the fork wasn't serviced, and nobody will know what is going on inside until it is torn down. The mechanic is right that if the fork service is just ignored, it is just a matter of time before it fails.

That's where being an experienced home mechanic with N+1 bikes saves the day. Tear the fork down, then order a rebuild kit if the insides looked good. Same with the brakes. That vintage Avid brakes had problems, but a home mechanic could fix or replace with SLX. Ebay replacement rear shifter also wouldn't be a big deal in normal times. With multiple bikes the downtime would be no big deal. Most the home mechanics here are doing the math in their head, and thinking how they could normally make this work.

But for a first bike for someone new to mountain biking, who would have to pay full price for new parts + shop labor fees, the math doesn't work the same. Doing the math, and it starts to make sense to sell it at Covid prices to an experienced home mechanic, and put the money that would be needed for repairs towards a new hardtail. One with modern geometry and gearing and a warranty since it is going to be your only bike.

On the other hand, buying a brand new bike is tough these days too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I just upgraded from a Rekon RL to Pike RCT3s and though the Pikes are plusher I think the Recons didn't really hold me back. You can find take-off Rekon RLs for maybe $150 on Pinkbike. I've had both a Reba and Rekon and I like the Rekon more - those steel stanchions are money!
Other than that I'd focus on geometry. If the bars are narrower than 720 or stem is longer than 60 go for wider bars and shorter stem. I'd also get a works components 1.5 degree or 2.0 degree angle adjustment headset. I've used them on two bikes now and I notice better handling at speed and down steeps, and no drawbacks when climbing.
That frame's got somewhat dated geometry but I think it has long chainstays which enhance comfort on hardtails, a 2-degree angle set and bar/stem would go a long way.
I had a similar problem and went a different route. Sold my 2014 hardtail for $600, picked up a 2019 hardtail on clearance for $950, then slapped on better tires/forks. Couldn't be happier!
 

·
Registered
Santa Cruz Hightower C XXL
Joined
·
60 Posts
Are you looking to trail ride / XC, or bomb down steep single tracks and hit jumps? If flowy trails / XC is what you will be riding then see if someone will rebuild the forks or get new ones. I've had luck with CL used buys. The adjustable anglesets will update the frame geometry some and are relatively cheap. A 120mm fork will improve the geometry as well. As was said the other shifter parts are fairly cheap online as long as you stick with the mid level Sram gear.
I you're thinking about bombing down hills and hitting jumps, then you might want to just fix what really needs to be fixed and ride it while you save up for an enduro bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
1928100
1928101
Sounds to me like it’s worn to the point it’s taking the finish off the stanchions. I understand why a shop wouldn’t want to gamble with a repair that might not work. I’m interested to see a picture of what’s going on with it .
Ya. I believe that's the case.
I'll try to get a photo up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Are you looking to trail ride / XC, or bomb down steep single tracks and hit jumps? If flowy trails / XC is what you will be riding then see if someone will rebuild the forks or get new ones. I've had luck with CL used buys. The adjustable anglesets will update the frame geometry some and are relatively cheap. A 120mm fork will improve the geometry as well. As was said the other shifter parts are fairly cheap online as long as you stick with the mid level Sram gear.
I you're thinking about bombing down hills and hitting jumps, then you might want to just fix what really needs to be fixed and ride it while you save up for an enduro bike.
I'm mostly looking for xc rides.
I'm signed up for the leadville 100 this August and didn't realize there were issues with the fork when I bought the bike specifically for this race.
This is my first mtb so suspension is new to me.
 

·
Registered
Santa Cruz Hightower C XXL
Joined
·
60 Posts
Metal on metal there. I would buy a new fork. Leadville 100 is quite a grind but definitely an XC event. Your bike is a non-boost so the hubs are a little narrower than the current standard. You can buy any tapered steerer tube fork and it will fit, but you'll have to buy a boost adapter kit to make it work with your narrower hub. It's some spacers to fill the gap on the axel and line up the rotor. Here's a decent FOX XC 110mm fork that's currently "in stock":) You can get the boost adapter kits cheap.
Fox Suspension Rythym 34 140 29 15QRx110 - OE
 

·
well mannered lout
Joined
·
3,100 Posts
That fork is pretty much used up. If you’re handy enough you could polish it up and try new seals as a Hail Mary try but I wouldn’t spend any more money than that. It’s not suitable for a race bike. Sorry for your loss
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This is a conundrum. It is a nice ride that in normal times an experienced home mechanic could whip into shape, and it would work great as a blue/green trail bike.

The fork is the wildcard. Burnished (shiny) stanchions can be a sign dry seals are rubbing, where there isn't any lube between the rubber and the metal. It doesn't automatically mean you need a new fork. It might be rebuildable. But dry seals mean the rest of the fork wasn't serviced, and nobody will know what is going on inside until it is torn down. The mechanic is right that if the fork service is just ignored, it is just a matter of time before it fails.

That's where being an experienced home mechanic with N+1 bikes saves the day. Tear the fork down, then order a rebuild kit if the insides looked good. Same with the brakes. That vintage Avid brakes had problems, but a home mechanic could fix or replace with SLX. Ebay replacement rear shifter also wouldn't be a big deal in normal times. With multiple bikes the downtime would be no big deal. Most the home mechanics here are doing the math in their head, and thinking how they could normally make this work.

But for a first bike for someone new to mountain biking, who would have to pay full price for new parts + shop labor fees, the math doesn't work the same. Doing the math, and it starts to make sense to sell it at Covid prices to an experienced home mechanic, and put the money that would be needed for repairs towards a new hardtail. One with modern geometry and gearing and a warranty since it is going to be your only bike.

On the other hand, buying a brand new bike is tough these days too.
Thanks. That's good advice.
I found a barely used xx1 shifter 11 speed that I put on myself. Easy peezy.
I very well may take a wack at the fork rebuild.
Like @MOJO K and @Tall BMX'r say. What do I have to loose?

A brake change is also something I can handle.
Thanks!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Metal on metal there. I would buy a new fork. Leadville 100 is quite a grind but definitely an XC event. Your bike is a non-boost so the hubs are a little narrower than the current standard. You can buy any tapered steerer tube fork and it will fit, but you'll have to buy a boost adapter kit to make it work with your narrower hub. It's some spacers to fill the gap on the axel and line up the rotor. Here's a decent FOX XC 110mm fork that's currently "in stock":) You can get the boost adapter kits cheap.
Fox Suspension Rythym 34 140 29 15QRx110 - OE
Is a 34 over forked for my bike? Or does it really matter over a fox 32
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top