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I think of an AM bike like an XC bike but a little more heavy duty. Something that you can attack rock gardens with without having to "tip toe" down, something you can hit a several drop or jumps that are a few feet tall. Something with 5-6" of travel and preferably coil over suspension. Basically a bike that you can come up to a curb on your street and almost beable to roll right over it, or just pull up slightly on the front to roll over it, in a completely seated position.

This is where things can get tricky, some prefer to save weight using air shocks, others prefer to save weight in other areas.

I have always preferred to use light weight wheels since rotational wt makes a huge difference, I have done this ever since I was racing BMX and even as a teenager was running 1 3/8" rims compared to everyone elses 20x2.0+ rims. Alloy nipples, butted spokes, and XC rims. I also prefer to be clipped in (opposed to platforms). I also care about the weight of practically every other component of my bike (Ti bolt kits all over the place, old school XTR everywhere, Alloy chainring bolts, etc... I know 95% of the people out there that ride AM bikes couldn't careless about Weight, but I am not the greatest climber in the 1st place so I figure I still need something light, but also strong. But Like I said, I really prefer coilovers compared to air shocks.

My bike is approaching 30 pounds (not sure the exact weight, with several of the new parts that will be going on it when I get back from Christmas vacation, but it was between 27-28 pounds before, but before that it was a 25.5# bike, but only got 4.5" travel and no rear disc brakes (V-brakes) etc.... So going basically a 25# bike to a 30# bike is not something I like.

Since AM bikes are made to go up and down equally as well, am I crazy to care that my bike is approaching 30#?
 

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Don't be hasty.
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Depends, because AM is a very wide category. I consider my 575 AM and it's right about 26lbs, with solid wheels, 20mm fork, and Fox DHX. I have no problem with rough terrain or drops, but I'm sure lots of people in this forum would think it's dumb or too XC. In the end you should just not worry what the 'norm' is and go with what you want.
 

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I guess I'm in the 95% then, I've added a pound or two to my bike. I cased a landing and tacoed my back wheel; my bike comes with XC rims, essentially, so I needed to upgrade to a heavier-duty wheelset since I leave the ground whenever I can. I don't race uphill so if I take a few minutes longer than before then so be it, and to be honest if I do take longer I don't notice it. I climb for the cardio workout and so that I get my adrenaline fix bombing down the hill as fast as I can afterward. Doing so takes strong parts so I'm not very concerned about trying to shave a pound here and there, and I'm not inclined to spend a bunch of cash parting things out to TI or carbon. I dab my feet way too much to consider clipping in.

I guess it depends on your perspective on riding. Some AM riders will lean toward XC and others toward DH; I'm in the latter group. The XC ones will be more concerned about weight I suppose.
 

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soya- what wheel set are you running on your 575 ? what fork ? full carbon rear or the alloy/ carbon ?

i ask because i just picked up a 575 with the enduro build kit and am wondering about its capability when it comes to the gnarlier stuff, and because you classified your 575 as AM
 

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wuss
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I don't think there is any question on weight affecting the bike, especially for climbing. It's really up to you to find the right balance. I did a lot of weight weenying on my previous bike, and definitely noticed a difference while climbing. Now I'm trying to build on my descending confidence and my bike weights a few pounds more. However I have wider rims, a coil fork with 36mm stanchions and a coil shock. I'm thinking of starting to go to the gym to get more strength to make climbing feel the same. :D
 

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Maybe, probably the most important weight saving of any component is your wheels. On AM bikes this is hard cause you have to consider durability versus weight. Having a fairly light weight set will make for a less grueling ride cause it takes a lots of effort to to clear obstacles if you have get big wheels up to speed. I personally run Mavic SX wheels, which, at about 1800 grams, are pretty tough.
 

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You wanna go ridin?
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Depends. I like a heavier bike for the rough stuff for the usual reasons like durability etc but when I get on my road or XC bike after the AM rig they feel light and I can fly on them. So for me I like the heavier bike for training in a way.
 

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biking is fun
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since i already have a dedicated DH bike that i use for shuttle rides i like to have a light AM bike. My current nomad weighs 31 lbs but it will soon be replaced with the new banshee spitfire and hopefully i can get it down to sub 30 lbs.

I think alot has to do with geometry. The reason XC bikes are soo sketchy when it gets rough is because they have steep head angles (sure being really light doesn't help either). There are alot of new bikes coming out (like the spitfire) that will make light builds feel alot better when going fast and over rocks.
 

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think
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other aardvark said:
"GOSH!!!":D

Still got to ride the dam thing up hill to go down.
All bikes are a compromise between durability, cost, and weight. If he has managed to build a bike at low weight that has the durability he needs at a manageable cost then he's good to go.

Edit: i should clarify. I was saying it should be renamed because defining "all mountain", which is by nature a nonsense term, seems to perplex people so much and yet matter so little.
 

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I guess it depends if you're a "horse for the course" guy "or run what ya brung". I would like to be able to pedal up but i don't care to go up xc race pace either. Then look for a few features to hit on the way down. My Covert is @ a sexy/sturdy 32lbs with all of Tr.s available parts. I've never found away to grin about a climb ever so a little meat on the ride down is so much more confidence inspiring = more grin. ofcourse the geo has to be right always.
 

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Since I'm starting with a FR/DH bike, I make it AM by:

Whistler -> Local trails
Totem -> Fox36 TALAS
2.5 DH tires -> 2.35 AM tires tubeless
DHX Coil -> RP23
38lbs -> 33.5 lbs

Instant AM! Still have 6+" of travel. Can lighten up a bunch more with simple changes like stem, bash, etc, but I'm satisfied with those quick changes I can make in snap.

For pure XC, I just grab one of the hardtails.
 

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To me an AM bike is a trail bike that's biased a little towards FR/DH, but its not a FR/DH bike. By definition there are strength compromises made to gain the ability to climb and basically ride anywhere you want to ride. Otherwise it wouldn't be 'all mountain'. So if you're building an AM bike, you're SUPPOSED TO think about weight.

What you build depends on your riding style and body type, and maybe what other bikes you have. I can get away with lighter components for AM because I weigh 140 lbs. Plus, for me a heavy bike makes a bigger difference for climbing, percentage-wise, than it would for a clyde.

Another factor, though, is that I have a light XC bike already, so to me there's no point in building up a trail bike that only weighs 2 or 3 pounds more, they'd be too much alike. My AM bike is 31.5 and my xc bike is 24.3 lbs. If I was to have only one bike I'd want something that was in the 26-28 lb range so I could have fun on the DH but still stand a chance of keeping up with my hammerhead XC buddies.
 

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Don't be hasty.
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nightofthefleming said:
soya- what wheel set are you running on your 575 ? what fork ? full carbon rear or the alloy/ carbon ?

i ask because i just picked up a 575 with the enduro build kit and am wondering about its capability when it comes to the gnarlier stuff, and because you classified your 575 as AM
Hope Pro 2 with Mavic 719's, fork is a Manitou minute elite absolute TA. The Yeti is an 07 so it's an all aluminum rear.
 

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bad news said:
All bikes are a compromise between durability, cost, and weight. If he has managed to build a bike at low weight that has the durability he needs at a manageable cost then he's good to go.

Edit: i should clarify. I was saying it should be renamed because defining "all mountain", which is by nature a nonsense term, seems to perplex people so much and yet matter so little.
Fair enough ...

Its kind interesting that in the USA an AM bike is what we in Australia would call a light free ride rig.

Yep, money is an issue re. strength versus weight and so called "AM" bikes have every bell and whistle in the mtb tech book with gadgets trickling down from both XC and DH. Re 'AM' bikes in general, there kind of the frankensteins monster of the bicycle world.
 

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wuss
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bad news said:
All bikes are a compromise between durability, cost, and weight. If he has managed to build a bike at low weight that has the durability he needs at a manageable cost then he's good to go.

Edit: i should clarify. I was saying it should be renamed because defining "all mountain", which is by nature a nonsense term, seems to perplex people so much and yet matter so little.
You need to add performance into your compromise.
 
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