Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
it will change the handling characteristics of the bike. the higher front end will create a more slack head tube angle. the front end will wander more easily on climbs, and steering will be a little less precise.

I went from80mm to 100mm on my XC bike and it took some time to get used to.
 

·
Time is not a road.
Joined
·
4,150 Posts
Ruskyi121 said:
I own a norco wolverine and i am upgrading the fork and i was wondering whether i can go with 105 mm fork since it had 75 mm before. Will it mess up my frame. (The head tube angle is 70 if that helps at all)

http://www.norco.com/bikes/2004bikes/wolverine.htm

Thank you :)
I'd go for it. 70 seems like a slack head angle for a hardtail though. For every 10mm of travel, I think you're adjusting a degree, so you'll end up with a 68 degree HA. You'll notice a diff, but you can adjust. I went from 100mm to 130mm and it wasn't that bad.

You could change to a 0 degree stem to help, if you're still using the riser stem that listed in specs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yea i thougt so too so it should be 72 now!! ahh i put on the fork and i didnt feel any difference if so it got better. Maybe this bike was built for 100 mm but they were too cheap and lapped the damn suntour 75 mm fork one (damn i hated it :mad: ) but now im happy :p .

k thanks for help guys
 

·
Time is not a road.
Joined
·
4,150 Posts
frank n. beans said:
Huh? No. If you lengthen the fork, the head tube angle will decrease.
Right! A shorter fork would bring the angle closer to perpendicular to the ground, thus increase the angle. A taller fork slackens the front end. That's why XC bikes have a HA of 70-71 degrees and freeride/DH bikes have a HA of 68-67 degrees - well, that's not just why, there's more to it than that, but that's the general way of things.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top