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I got two Manitou coil spring folks and wondering if it is essential to use their M prep lube for regular maintainance. any suggestion?
 

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BigBull said:
I got two Manitou coil spring folks and wondering if it is essential to use their M prep lube for regular maintainance. any suggestion?
I don't think the folks over at Manitou would appreciate you trying to squirt lube all over them. However, you will find that their forks work a whole lot better if properly lubed.

-Dave
 

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BigBull said:
I got two Manitou coil spring folks and wondering if it is essential to use their M prep lube for regular maintainance. any suggestion?
In one regard, the forks are no different internally than any non-Micro Lube equipped Rock Shox or Marzocchi, which don't get the benefit of regular grease injections.

But since you've got it, why not give it a squirt every now and then?
 

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A 1000 one-liners come to mind, but...

BigBull said:
I got two Manitou coil spring folks and wondering if it is essential to use their M prep lube for regular maintainance. any suggestion?
seriously it also depends (some more one-liners) on which Manitou you have. A Firefly is a coil fork but doesn't use the grease injection system. Some other forks in their lineup do/did. Which one is yours?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
TNC said:
seriously it also depends (some more one-liners) on which Manitou you have. A Firefly is a coil fork but doesn't use the grease injection system. Some other forks in their lineup do/did. Which one is yours?
Black Elite and an older model (forgot the name) both have lube injection holes, i just wondering if they're only there for marketing reason or really need to be lubed.
 

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Yeah dude

I'm running an SX-R and a Black and the microlube ports make all the difference in maintenance. All forks need to be regularly cleaned and re-lubed if you ride a lot, esp. in a lot of dust or wet conditions. I've helped several riders clean and re-lube their forks and they usually can't believe how much better they work afterwards. Manitou's grease fittings have made overhauls a once or twice a year chore (although they suggest more often). Use your ports!
 
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I agree completely

dusty said:
All forks need to be regularly cleaned and re-lubed if you ride a lot, esp. in a lot of dust or wet conditions. QUOTE]

I have a 2001 Mars Elite and it performs very well when properly maintained, which includes micro lube in between cleanings. Just remember that you can't continue injecting prep M indefinitely; sooner or later you'll need to open it up and clean the fork.
 

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The Manitou dude I spoke to on the phone says to use them. I've had my Mantious for 4 years. Lube em regularly and so far so good. You don't want to then don't.
 

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manitou is kind of J O 'd on this

I have Two manitou forks an Axel and a Black Elite. You have to buy a grease gun for $10 and the grease. Not so bad but then because I am 190 lbs I need a stiffer spring which nobody can get for me at a reasonable price.

Why not offer the fork for sale with a choice of springs? The axel cost 70 for the whole fork and I have to pay $25 to get a spring kit?

It is like paying $25 for 8 mb of memory from sony for ps2. Another total scam, but don't get me started on that.
 

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On the models with Microlube ports you need to squeeze in a bit of lube regularly. Unlike other forks which use semi-bath lube, the seals don't let anything in or out (well not supposed to anyway) so the oil lasts intact longer inside the fork. The Manitou seals are designed to let a bit of grease slowly slip out and lube the stanctions. It works quite well because the fork will run very smooth but if you don't regrease as recommended you will end up running the fork dry.
 

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Hecubus said:
On the models with Microlube ports you need to squeeze in a bit of lube regularly. Unlike other forks which use semi-bath lube, the seals don't let anything in or out (well not supposed to anyway) so the oil lasts intact longer inside the fork. The Manitou seals are designed to let a bit of grease slowly slip out and lube the stanctions. It works quite well because the fork will run very smooth but if you don't regrease as recommended you will end up running the fork dry.
Not to belabor my point or pick a fight or anything like that (and as I stated before, if a fork has MicroLube ports, may as well use 'em), but the MicroLube-equipped Manitous are really nothing special compared to other, non-Manitou, non-Microlube forks.

Just like Rock Shox, just like White Brothers, just like RST, MicroLube equipped Manitous are nothing more than two stanchions sliding through two bushings pressed into the lowers. The Evil Genius and Enduro seals I've run on my Manitou have the exact same function as the Triple-X and Enduro seals I've run on my Rock Shox, and the exact same function as the seals I've run on every other fork: Keep lube in and keep dirt and water out. The Manitou seals honestly, truely are not designed to leach grease over time (although they might unintentionally).

My one beef with Manitou Prep-M used to be that it was very thin and drippy (the old green stuff, made by Maxima). It would inject, and with use would pretty quickly end up at the bottom of the fork where it did no good. So if that's all the fork was lubed with (even during reassembly), regular injections were a good idea.

But the current Prep-M, which is made by Motorex, has a thicker consistancy, much like Slick Honey. It collects internally around the bushings and doesn't slag off very easily, so it does a better job of "being there" where it's needed and takes longer to collect at the bottom.

But all forks non-bath forks (again, including forks from Rock Shox, WB, etc.) have this same problem and regularly (depending on use) need to be freshened up with new grease.

So again, I'm a fan of Microlube and if you have good seals (*cough* <a href="http://www.enduroforkseals.com/">Enduro</a> *cough*) occasional injections is all that's needed over the course of a year or 18 months or whatever maintenance/disassembly cycle you strive for.

But if someone chooses not to use Microlube (and doesn't have the old drippy Prep-M inside), it really is no worse off than all those other non-bath forks from the other manufacturers that too many of us don't service often enough as it is.

But again: If you're not servicing your fork religiously, if you've got MicroLube, use it.
 

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TNC said:
seriously it also depends (some more one-liners) on which Manitou you have. A Firefly is a coil fork but doesn't use the grease injection system. Some other forks in their lineup do/did. Which one is yours?
I have a 03 Firefly. Does that mean what I see are dummy microlube ports on there? I tried to press them in and even gently tapped on it with a small hammer and screwdriver, but the port covers?? won't budge. Am I doing something wrong or are they just solid plugs?

Duc
 

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Speedüb Nate said:
Not to belabor my point or pick a fight or anything like that (and as I stated before, if a fork has MicroLube ports, may as well use 'em), but the MicroLube-equipped Manitous are really nothing special compared to other, non-Manitou, non-Microlube forks.

Just like Rock Shox, just like White Brothers, just like RST, MicroLube equipped Manitous are nothing more than two stanchions sliding through two bushings pressed into the lowers. The Evil Genius and Enduro seals I've run on my Manitou have the exact same function as the Triple-X and Enduro seals I've run on my Rock Shox, and the exact same function as the seals I've run on every other fork: Keep lube in and keep dirt and water out. The Manitou seals honestly, truely are not designed to leach grease over time (although they might unintentionally).

My one beef with Manitou Prep-M used to be that it was very thin and drippy (the old green stuff, made by Maxima). It would inject, and with use would pretty quickly end up at the bottom of the fork where it did no good. So if that's all the fork was lubed with (even during reassembly), regular injections were a good idea.

But the current Prep-M, which is made by Motorex, has a thicker consistancy, much like Slick Honey. It collects internally around the bushings and doesn't slag off very easily, so it does a better job of "being there" where it's needed and takes longer to collect at the bottom.

But all forks non-bath forks (again, including forks from Rock Shox, WB, etc.) have this same problem and regularly (depending on use) need to be freshened up with new grease.

So again, I'm a fan of Microlube and if you have good seals (*cough* <a href="http://www.enduroforkseals.com/">Enduro</a> *cough*) occasional injections is all that's needed over the course of a year or 18 months or whatever maintenance/disassembly cycle you strive for.

But if someone chooses not to use Microlube (and doesn't have the old drippy Prep-M inside), it really is no worse off than all those other non-bath forks from the other manufacturers that too many of us don't service often enough as it is.

But again: If you're not servicing your fork religiously, if you've got MicroLube, use it.
You're right, they really aint nothing special. I'm just commenting on what I've heard about the system. Frankly I'm glad they eliminated them in favor of the new evil genius seal system which is more like what just about everyone uses. Nevertheless in the microlube models you'll notice the seal around the stanction (at least on all the ML blacks I've seen) isn't so tight. There is a very small gap on purpose. From what I've heard they are even designed to be unidirectional and let some oil/grease escape but not let much in. Hence the point of the microlube and the frequent re-squirting service schedule recommended for them. Eventually the grease will be dried out. I've noticed in an 03 black comp I have that there is always a noticeable film of prep m coating the stanctions lengs that runs through the seals. All of the ones I've seen do this until they dry out.
 

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They are microlube ports

duc135 said:
I have a 03 Firefly. Does that mean what I see are dummy microlube ports on there? I tried to press them in and even gently tapped on it with a small hammer and screwdriver, but the port covers?? won't budge. Am I doing something wrong or are they just solid plugs?

Duc
Not to be contrary to those who believe the microlube system is bunk, but they ain't right. Every Manitou I've had gets stiction when it dries up in there.
 

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The microlube port is ideally located.

DaveX said:
I don't think the folks over at Manitou would appreciate you trying to squirt lube all over them. However, you will find that their forks work a whole lot better if properly lubed.

-Dave
That grease port is perfectly located between the upper and lower bushing which is where it's obviously needed most. What this offers over the myriad of other past "grease" forks is the fact that the grease goes in the ideal space where the lube is most effective while the fork stanchion is inserted in the leg--look at it as a kind of sandwich. When servicing other non-oil bath grease forks, you can only get so much grease in that space in the leg and then you have to insert the stanchion into the leg, which obviously pushes some of the grease into the bottom of the leg. This port system allows you to get maximum grease in that spot between the bushings, and then to keep some grease in there during service intervals. It's the best idea for a grease fork and gave new life to the design for Manitou.
 

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The Axel fork is a very entry level fork. Why would they make an entry level spring for it? The cost of the spring is the same for most forks of the same travel.
 

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debaucherous said:
Not to be contrary to those who believe the microlube system is bunk, but they ain't right. Every Manitou I've had gets stiction when it dries up in there.
How do I open the ports? Big hammer and countersink? The ports on my Firefly don't seem to move with light tapping with a small hammer and screwdriver. This is a new 03 Firefly with less than 30 dry miles on it.

Duc
 

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duc135 said:
How do I open the ports? Big hammer and countersink? The ports on my Firefly don't seem to move with light tapping with a small hammer and screwdriver. This is a new 03 Firefly with less than 30 dry miles on it.

Duc
No need. Just get a grease gun with a standard needle type injector (it's doesn't have to be the Manitou model, it's a standardized part). The grease will inject past a little ball that normally sits behind the port to keep grease from squirting back out and water and grime from getting in.
 

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I don't know what you are talking about

fred? said:
The Axel fork is a very entry level fork. Why would they make an entry level spring for it? The cost of the spring is the same for most forks of the same travel.
what does my size have to do with to do with entry level? I weigh 195 and should be able to get my fork with the stiffer springs that manitou recommends for my weight. There are three springs for Manitou and the one you should use is determined by your weight.
 

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Word...

Speedüb Nate said:
No need. Just get a grease gun with a standard needle type injector (it's doesn't have to be the Manitou model, it's a standardized part). The grease will inject past a little ball that normally sits behind the port to keep grease from squirting back out and water and grime from getting in.
Word.
And stop hitting the grease ports with a hammer. :)
 
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