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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Been trying to find a set of Juicy's, but every source I have found is out of stock.

Has Avid stopped making hydraulics?

My agenda is that I want to put them on the front wheels of a recumbent trike and join the lines with a T connector into a single brake lever to give balanced one-handed control of the front while keeping the Avid mech on the rear - controlled by the other hand.

Assuming they are history, can anybody suggest alternatives besides Shimano? Amazon seems tb full of them, but I have no clue as to reliability/parts/replacement pads.
 

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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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You said that with an evil smirk.
 

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furker
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My agenda is that I want to put them on the front wheels of a recumbent trike and join the lines with a T connector into a single brake lever to give balanced one-handed control of the front
Splitting a hydraulic line with a T connector? That configuration would give a very soft brake lever, and weak braking force. The brakes might not even fully engage before the lever hits the bars. And it might be very difficult to bleed the system.

hydraulic brakes work on a ratio between how much fluid the brake lever pushes, and how much the pistons move for that volume of fluid. The Y connector will throw off that ratio. For example, normally if the brake lever pushes 2ml of brake fluid down the hose, then the caliper will move 2ml worth of displacement.

But if you split the hose, now each caliper will only get 1ml worth of displacement each. So you have half the braking force at the rotor. In order to get the same braking force at the rotor as with 1 caliper, you will need to squeeze the lever twice as far in order to move twice as much fluid. You will also need to apply twice as much force on the brake lever to get the same clamping force at the rotor, because you've lost mechanical advantage.
 

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Splitting a hydraulic line with a T connector? That configuration would give a very soft brake lever, and weak braking force. The brakes might not even fully engage before the lever hits the bars. And it might be very difficult to bleed the system.

hydraulic brakes work on a ratio between how much fluid the brake lever pushes, and how much the pistons move for that volume of fluid. The Y connector will throw off that ratio. For example, normally if the brake lever pushes 2ml of brake fluid down the hose, then the caliper will move 2ml worth of displacement.

But if you split the hose, now each caliper will only get 1ml worth of displacement each. So you have half the braking force at the rotor. In order to get the same braking force at the rotor as with 1 caliper, you will need to squeeze the lever twice as far in order to move twice as much fluid. You will also need to apply twice as much force on the brake lever to get the same clamping force at the rotor, because you've lost mechanical advantage.
There ARE manifolds that do what the OP wants, but they are expensive niche products (Hope). I am not sure that they are even in production anymore.
 

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monster member
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They changed the name to run as far away from the rep Avid had for shitty brakes.
Dating myself, but I'd say they're especially avoiding their Avid Elixir past. Gawd I hated them when an o-ring failed on a brake with only like 100 miles on it, and they didn't offer any seal kit or replacement o-rings I needed. (I mean, I would've paid for the o-ring I needed, or any kit that included the o-ring.) They were just non-repairable which was a dumbass marketing strategy for anything on a mountainbike. F' them, I replaced it with a Hope Pro X2 Race for like $300. (ha ha, yeah, I really showed them.)

Anyway, my 2019 bike came with some SRAM Guide T's which are entry level but I have no complaints after about 500 miles/2 years.
 

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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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Tough crowd.
 

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Dating myself, but I'd say they're especially avoiding their Avid Elixir past. Gawd I hated them when an o-ring failed on a brake with only like 100 miles on it, and they didn't offer any seal kit or replacement o-rings I needed. (I mean, I would've paid for the o-ring I needed, or any kit that included the o-ring.) They were just non-repairable which was a dumbass marketing strategy for anything on a mountainbike.
So the Avid elixir caliper and lever repair kits I have in my parts box don't really exist?
 

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high pivot witchcraft
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So the Avid elixir caliper and lever repair kits I have in my parts box don't really exist?
I don’t doubt it. I expect those things (among many other repair related items) were likely cash cows for SRAM. Likely out sold their brakes, by multiples. I still envision a place reserved in he11 for the creator of the Avid brake (sadistic basturd).

That said, their successor Guides have been fantastic. I am currently running 3 sets with great success.
 

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There ARE manifolds that do what the OP wants, but they are expensive niche products (Hope). I am not sure that they are even in production anymore.
I just saw that Hope has dual lever controls now for single-hand operation instead of the manifold thing. lets you adjust pressure to each brake independently

There's also this, which probably does the job better than the older manifolds by avoiding the power loss. Probably the best option for the application OP wants, since even power to each wheel is probably the best.

OutBraker | Safe Anti-Lock Braking
 

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EMBA MTB Lead Instructor
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I had a set of Juicy 3's side by side with the SRAM Guides - literally the exact same brake.
 
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