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Got in the Fargo Ti last week (medium frame) and brought it to the LBS for a weigh in. 3.5lb frame weight. It really feels like nothing when balanced on your finger. The steel fork weighs 2.5lb. The frame looks pretty substantial but come on. Three and one half pounds??? Will this really handle heavy loads on trails? I don't have any experience with Titanium (other than chemical plant operations (don't mix it with dry chlorine or you got a FIRE)) other than I've kinda lusted after it. Have a carbon frame too and gonna try to break it but it seems like plastic tubes.
I plan on someday in the next few years doing a year tour/mtb trip with this frame. Anybody got some thoughts as to longevity?
thanks
bike ON
bob
 

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pghmtnbiker said:
why are ti touring bikes used? Seems to me the less flexy a frame the better. To achieve a stiff ti frame requires larger tubing, negating the weight savings. just wondering.
The lack of corrosion and no paint to chip factor is desirable on a touring bike as well. Or at least it is imho.
 

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i heart singletrack
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red-haze.com said:
Got in the Fargo Ti last week (medium frame) and brought it to the LBS for a weigh in. 3.5lb frame weight. It really feels like nothing when balanced on your finger. The steel fork weighs 2.5lb. The frame looks pretty substantial but come on. Three and one half pounds??? Will this really handle heavy loads on trails? I don't have any experience with Titanium (other than chemical plant operations (don't mix it with dry chlorine or you got a FIRE)) other than I've kinda lusted after it. Have a carbon frame too and gonna try to break it but it seems like plastic tubes.
I plan on someday in the next few years doing a year tour/mtb trip with this frame. Anybody got some thoughts as to longevity?
thanks
bike ON
bob
I can say confidently, no... It's plenty strong and stiff. And from what I know, and have experienced in my other two titanium Salsa bikes, I believe it will be durable.

You will be more stoked than you ever thought you'd be. Mark my words...

(Edit to add content. Original post was overly brief.)
 

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i heart singletrack
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pghmtnbiker said:
why are ti touring bikes used? Seems to me the less flexy a frame the better. To achieve a stiff ti frame requires larger tubing, negating the weight savings. just wondering.
Notice the diameter of tubing being employed. There is no inefficient flex going on here...
 

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Harmonius Wrench
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seat_boy said:
Mgersib posted elsewhere--it's basically a prototype of the Ti Fargo.
It is THE prototype of the titanium Fargo and the Fargo steel V2 bikes. It is called "The Bike With No Name" which was the moniker given to it by the head honch at Salsa who had it made originally by Lynskey.

There are some minor detail differences between TBWNN and the production Fargo titaniums, but basically the foundation is the same for the proto and the production bike.
 

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i heart singletrack
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kapusta said:
The rear dropout does not look like the Fargo Ti pictures I have seen.
It's the prototype known by Salsa insiders as the "Bike With No Name," or simply the BWNN. It was one prototype built during the development of the Ti Fargo, but it has about 1/2" shorter chainstays than a Fargo (at 17.5-inches) and (as you noticed), similar dropouts to an El Mariachi Ti, though the chainstays are larger 7/8" diameter, triple-bend tubes (the El Mariachi is 1/2", double bend).

So, it's basically a custom...
 
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