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Jacob 34:19
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There's been a lot of talk lately about touring and adventure riding. I was in REI today to pick up a hitch rack and saw this...



Link: https://www.rei.com/product/775749

29" wheels - check
racks and disk brakes - check
funky bars - check

And that's what actually caught my eye. Very interesting set-up with the twist shifters on the ends of the bars. Looks like a pretty nice set-up for longer, less technical riding. I've seen tons of pics with flat bars, risers, drops, dirt drops, H-bars, etc... But I don't think I've ever seen this set-up before. Anyone tried it? Seems like it could be a great option on something like a Fargo.

If I win the Fargo from Dirt Rag this month, I'll try it and let you know;)
 

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Harmonius Wrench
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JAKEtheDOG said:
There's been a lot of talk lately about touring and adventure riding. I was in REI today to pick up a hitch rack and saw this...

Link: http://www.rei.com/product/775749

29" wheels - check
racks and disk brakes - check
funky bars - check

And that's what actually caught my eye. Very interesting set-up with the twist shifters on the ends of the bars. Looks like a pretty nice set-up for longer, less technical riding. I've seen tons of pics with flat bars, risers, drops, dirt drops, H-bars, etc... But I don't think I've ever seen this set-up before. Anyone tried it? Seems like it could be a great option on something like a Fargo.

If I win the Fargo from Dirt Rag this month, I'll try it and let you know;)
That's a typical trekking bar set up. Lots of European type bikes are set up this way. Schwinn tried that bar set up on a CrissCross back in the 90's. It didn't really catch on. In fact, I still see those rigs come in for tune ups all the time.

Nashbar used to have an aluminum bar like it, and I have a steel bar from the aforementioned Schwinn laying around. I just don't see that it would be that practical for my uses.

Interesting find though. A great commuter choice if nothing else.
 

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Recovering couch patato
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Gas is still almost for free in the US, compared to Europe. We never seem to stop driving our cars, though.

Top tubes are indeed 2" longer than one would expect for such a bike. Cruiser bars might work out better?
 

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I went and tried it out. I like the handlebar a lot, it has positions for relaxed downhill, stretched out climbing, and a side position when you really mash on the pedals and need a lot of arm leverage. I'm surprised they aren't more popular. I guess they look sorta dorky but I think they'd be more comfortable than drop bars.

The frame is longer to compensate for the two reaches with the stem in the middle of them both. I tried a frame one size smaller than what I'd ordinary use and now I wish I had tried the bigger one since the relaxed position would have been about normal.

The bike seems heavy for aluminum. The tires are cool, not too skinny with a wormy-style tread. Maybe a do-it-all bike with a reba on front.
 

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Harmonius Wrench
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esXso said:
I went and tried it out. I like the handlebar a lot, it has positions for relaxed downhill, stretched out climbing, and a side position when you really mash on the pedals and need a lot of arm leverage. I'm surprised they aren't more popular. I guess they look sorta dorky but I think they'd be more comfortable than drop bars.

The frame is longer to compensate for the two reaches with the stem in the middle of them both. I tried a frame one size smaller than what I'd ordinary use and now I wish I had tried the bigger one since the relaxed position would have been about normal.

The bike seems heavy for aluminum. The tires are cool, not too skinny with a wormy-style tread. Maybe a do-it-all bike with a reba on front.
1: Handle bar- This looks suspiciously like the steel Nashbar trekking bar I am familiar with. If indeed it is steel, it is a tank of a bar. The adjustable stem is also a boat anchor. Note that due to the position of the shifters and brake levers, you are at a great disadvantage off road since your hands are effectively at a point which would yeild little leverage over the bars in comparison to much wider stanced drop bars or traditional mtb bars. This is probably the biggest reason they will never catch on as a good off road alternative.

2. Weight- I looked over the specs, and besides the bars and stem you have several components that are heavy here. Deore hubs are heavy. Shimano mech disc brake calipers are bricks. The wheels on this bike must weigh a ton. (Just kidding, but I'm betting the rear wheel alone is 7-8lbs total with tire, cassette, and wheel assembly)

3. Sizing- The two largest sizes are the 29"er wheels. The others are 26"ers, so smaller than 6ft customers don't have a big wheeled option with this model. It seems awfully stretched out for a touring/adventure rig too. Just my opinion there.

Great commuter choice, but for off roading the Fargo, and the VooDoo Nakisi are better adventure/touring 29"er rigs.
 

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a.k.a. MTBMaven
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I don't think this bike is oriented at this audience, hence why some are down on it here.

Here is are some threads on BikeForums.net's Touring board:
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=472912

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=198871

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=351025

Also the trekking bar is a big hit with the touring crowd.

I understand this is a mountain biking site. I just wanted to point out that this bike does have an audience, it's just not the hardcore MTBer.
 

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Recovering couch patato
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the idea of the butterfly bars is cool, but based off the idea that a flat straight handlebar is a good thing to have. If I could bend tubes, I'd do it totally differently, but still very similarly :)
I once posted the adburd design for what I called the "rear entry" handlebar, a bit like an H-bar plus another set of hand positions. Completicated though, one might as well have 2 handlebars. Ideally a set that will take 2 sets of bars.
 

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Good eye, I think that is a dandy bike.
The tires are 700x48c so it's likely that knobbies will fit.
The Fargo IS blingier but the Safari is soooo cheap.
Another thing I like is the non-suspension corrected fork. There would be no issues with getting the handlebar low enough.
The Safari handlebar doesn't bother me because I would ditch it right away.

I bought a Jamis Exile and turned it into an "adventure bike" like the Safari.
I found a rack that works with disk brakes and 1x9ed it. (The Exile is "gear ready".)
It probably cost me $300-400 more than the Safari costs.
The Jamis is a much better looking bike and there is no doubt that it is a true mountain bike but the Safari ain't bad at all.
 

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Harmonius Wrench
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Cloxxki said:
the idea of the butterfly bars is cool, but based off the idea that a flat straight handlebar is a good thing to have. If I could bend tubes, I'd do it totally differently, but still very similarly :)
I once posted the adburd design for what I called the "rear entry" handlebar, a bit like an H-bar plus another set of hand positions. Completicated though, one might as well have 2 handlebars. Ideally a set that will take 2 sets of bars.
Cloxx, have you seen the "Fred Bar" that Siren Bikes does? Initially Brendan did this bar only for his wife Mary's Tour Divide attempt, (which she successfully completed, by the way. ) Essentially it is two bars. The upper one being the "Fred Bar" which Mary had aero bars attached to for her Tour Divide ride. (Note: The link takes you to a post on the first bar in process)

It offered her a more relaxed position for longer, boring sections of the route. When things got more "mountain bike-ish" she went down to the "regular set" of bars. Interesting set up.

So interesting that apparently the Fred Bar is now in production.

The Fargo IS blingier but the Safari is soooo cheap.
As far as the quote above goes, it has been my experience that "just getting by" isn't nearly as good or as satisfying as getting the right rig for the job. The Safari is a trekking/commuter bike. Paths and roads are it's forte'. Great bike for that.

It isn't what the Fargo is. Two different animals, really.

So, if I were seriously going to tour and ride off road, bike trails, pavement, gravel, and mountains, the Safari, as it sits, isn't even in the same conversation as a Fargo. YMMV
 

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Lot of guys on the phred list (touring specific) are pretty keen on this bike due to it's price. Most of these guys are on road tourers that occasionally see off road routes. If they do, it's small sections of gravel or fire roads. I personally don't like grip shifters, and those bars are a bit weird for my tasts. As GTed mentioned, I associate those with some older Schwinn bikes that were just plain crap.
 
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