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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I installed some bb7 on my bike today never installed brakes on my bike ever so please bare with me. i followed instructions on avid website and also some youtube videos. everything seems like its working good. just was wondering on the pad adjustments you want the inboard pad the one that doesnt move closest to the rotor correct? so when u hit the brakes the rotor doesnt bend? also are wheels suppose to lock when u hit the brakes hard?
 

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1. Maybe.
2. Rotor is intended to flex, it's fine doing so. Moving the stationary pad closer to, or further away from the rotor is a way to adjust modulation.
3. To an extent, but I don't try to lock my wheels either, no reason to, usually makes for poor braking performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Bikinfoolferlife said:
1. Maybe.
2. Rotor is intended to flex, it's fine doing so. Moving the stationary pad closer to, or further away from the rotor is a way to adjust modulation.
3. To an extent, but I don't try to lock my wheels either, no reason to, usually makes for poor braking performance.
what do you mean by modulation? and also is it better to have a tight cable were u dont really have to move the lever to mucn to brake or is it better to have it a little loose i have it to the point were if i press really hard it hits my shiter but not hard enough to change gears on me.
 

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"what do you mean by modulation?"

Modulation is the way the brakes come on as you squeeze the lever. BB7s are adjustable to the point where you can have a "light switch" type feel to them, i.e. there is very little lever movement required for full power. Or you can have them set up so that you don't get full power until the lever almost hits the bar. Or anywhere in between. Usually most people prefer them somewhere in between. This allows you to finesse the brakes while riding, you can apply anything from light braking to scrub a bit of speed, to full on over the bars hard braking if needed. Just depends on how hard you pull the lever. In the same vien, it's perfectly alright to have a bit of a bend in the rotor when the brakes are applied. They're designed to operate that way. As noted adjusting the inner pad controls modulation, how the brakes come on, either all at once or a little at a time. Just don't get carried away! :D

"and also is it better to have a tight cable were u dont really have to move the lever to mucn to brake or is it better to have it a little loose i have it to the point were if i press really hard it hits my shiter but not hard enough to change gears on me."

Your preference on this one, but it is usually better to have things a bit tighter than that. The brake lever really shouldn't make contact with anything at full pull. The way most folks prefer their brakes set up is to have the pads make contact with the rotors when their fingers (as they are pulling the lever) just start to make a 90 degree bend. This is where your fingers are able to apply the most force to the lever. The "contact point" is adjusted by moving the outboard pad closer or further away from the rotor. Closer gives a shorter pull to contact, further out gives more lever pull to contact. If you can't get the lever pull the way you like it without making contact with the shifter you may need to rotate the shifters slightly to give you the clearance you need. It probably won't be a problem, but you'd be surprised at how hard you can pull, and how far a brake lever will move during a panic stop.

So experiment with the adjustments a little to find the set up you like. That's the beauty of BB7s. As long as they are properly set up and working properly, you can adjust them (with in limits of course) to feel and perform the way you want them too. My personal preference is for just a touch on the "on/off" side. I like my BBs to firm up just a bit faster than most riders. So I adjust my inside pad a click or too closer to the rotor than most. My outside pad is adjusted so that my fingers just barely (not quite though) make a 90 degree bend when the pad makes contact with the rotor. Like I said, it's all in what you like. :thumbsup:

Good Dirt
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Squash said:
"what do you mean by modulation?"

Modulation is the way the brakes come on as you squeeze the lever. BB7s are adjustable to the point where you can have a "light switch" type feel to them, i.e. there is very little lever movement required for full power. Or you can have them set up so that you don't get full power until the lever almost hits the bar. Or anywhere in between. Usually most people prefer them somewhere in between. This allows you to finesse the brakes while riding, you can apply anything from light braking to scrub a bit of speed, to full on over the bars hard braking if needed. Just depends on how hard you pull the lever. In the same vien, it's perfectly alright to have a bit of a bend in the rotor when the brakes are applied. They're designed to operate that way. As noted adjusting the inner pad controls modulation, how the brakes come on, either all at once or a little at a time. Just don't get carried away! :D

"and also is it better to have a tight cable were u dont really have to move the lever to mucn to brake or is it better to have it a little loose i have it to the point were if i press really hard it hits my shiter but not hard enough to change gears on me."

Your preference on this one, but it is usually better to have things a bit tighter than that. The brake lever really shouldn't make contact with anything at full pull. The way most folks prefer their brakes set up is to have the pads make contact with the rotors when their fingers (as they are pulling the lever) just start to make a 90 degree bend. This is where your fingers are able to apply the most force to the lever. The "contact point" is adjusted by moving the outboard pad closer or further away from the rotor. Closer gives a shorter pull to contact, further out gives more lever pull to contact. If you can't get the lever pull the way you like it without making contact with the shifter you may need to rotate the shifters slightly to give you the clearance you need. It probably won't be a problem, but you'd be surprised at how hard you can pull, and how far a brake lever will move during a panic stop.

So experiment with the adjustments a little to find the set up you like. That's the beauty of BB7s. As long as they are properly set up and working properly, you can adjust them (with in limits of course) to feel and perform the way you want them too. My personal preference is for just a touch on the "on/off" side. I like my BBs to firm up just a bit faster than most riders. So I adjust my inside pad a click or too closer to the rotor than most. My outside pad is adjusted so that my fingers just barely (not quite though) make a 90 degree bend when the pad makes contact with the rotor. Like I said, it's all in what you like. :thumbsup:

Good Dirt
hey thanks for your reply you covered alot to give me a good understanding on the topic of brakes. i am very new to biking so i feel lost on alot of things, so thanks for the information!!
 

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alphaqforever247 said:
if i press really hard it hits my shiter
Might want to edit that? :D

Squash took care of the modulation question nicely...

FWIW your cable tension isn't what makes your brake engage earlier in the lever travel, that's more about how close to the rotor you set your pads. You should adjust the cable tension just so that there's no slack, i.e. do not use the barrel adjuster after that to make it "tighter". Personally I use the lever's reach adjustment to bring the lever closer to the bar and adjust the caliper for engagement somewhere around the mid-point in the lever's travel, just what I find comfortable to use. Experiment.

What levers are you using with the brakes? Do they have adjustable leverage (like Avid's Speed Dial feature)? That's another way to fine tune your brakes...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bikinfoolferlife said:
Might want to edit that? :D

Squash took care of the modulation question nicely...

FWIW your cable tension isn't what makes your brake engage earlier in the lever travel, that's more about how close to the rotor you set your pads. You should adjust the cable tension just so that there's no slack, i.e. do not use the barrel adjuster after that to make it "tighter". Personally I use the lever's reach adjustment to bring the lever closer to the bar and adjust the caliper for engagement somewhere around the mid-point in the lever's travel, just what I find comfortable to use. Experiment.

What levers are you using with the brakes? Do they have adjustable leverage (like Avid's Speed Dial feature)? That's another way to fine tune your brakes...
i have the fr-5 i was about to buy the speed dial 7 but didnt want to since i had no idea what the difference is and how to adjust what. haha sorry im so lost very new to the biking scene
 

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alphaqforever247 said:
i have the fr-5 i was about to buy the speed dial 7 but didnt want to since i had no idea what the difference is and how to adjust what. haha sorry im so lost very new to the biking scene
That Speed Dial adjustment would be nicer to have, but you may as well use what you got...

Indeed there is quite a variety of gear available, good idea to start at the manufacturer's website and see what their hierarchy of products are before you shop so you know what features you get/not get as the retailers sometimes really slack off on that. I just googled the FR-5, for example, and found one ad that said it was the "perfect match" for a BB7 which I'd say is a stretch considering the levers Avid has further up the lineup...
 

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Squash's post was dead on. All I'll add is this...

Go find yourself a good long hill to cruise down.

Ride it, making lots of stops.

First, just mess with your inner pad. Maybe start with it really close to the rotor. Take note of how the On/Off feel Squash described becomes more of a light dimmer switch feel with each click of the pad AWAY from the rotor.

Once you dial that in, do the same with your outer pad.

Notice how that instant engagement when the pad is close to the rotor adjusts to a more comfortable finger position with each click away.

The goal of the exercise is to recognize the BB7 range of operation, and to discover what setup you prefer. But probably most importantly, it'll help you recognize when to adjust your pads for wear.
 
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